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  1. #1
    2 Star Lounger Calimanco's Avatar
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    PayPal phishing e-mail

    Just received an e-mail, allegedly from PayPal wanting my account details (I don't have an account ). On checking, it originates in the Far East. Its quite convincing, so stay alert people.

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  3. #2
    4 Star Lounger
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    Calimanco,

    ??Was it addressed to you by name, or just "Dear PayPal Customer," etc.???

    Zig

  4. #3
    Lounger
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    I get these 2-3 times a month and have never had a PP account. It's addressed to my email.

  5. #4
    Super Moderator
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    If you check the email's origin, you might be able to see where it's coming from. Quite possibly from an infected PC belonging to someone you know.
    Cheers,

    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

  6. #5
    3 Star Lounger KritzX's Avatar
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    I've got around 10-15 messages each from Wells Fargo, Paypal, Citi Bank and Amazon. One from Amazon came around 10 minutes after I had placed an order, claiming that there was a problem with my bank account, and asked to verify my credit card number. It looked so damn convincing and the timing was right too. I clicked on the link. Thankfully, Chrome reported it as a phishing site, before any damage was done. Since then, I've been very, very careful.
    Fact of Life:

    “Real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time.”
    Terry Pratchett

  7. #6
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    In the future, if an email looks good, open a browser and type the company's web address manually to verify. Never click on a link in an email.

    I also find that if you hover the mouse pointer over an email link, you can see the real URL at the bottom of the screen and you can often tell its bad.

    Jerry

  8. #7
    3 Star Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Or even better cut and paste into google. Fly by night scam sites are unlikely to come to the top of a search.

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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