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  1. #1
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    Windows 7 taking 5 minutes to shutdown in safe mode.

    Hello,

    I've noticed Windows 7 taking longer and longer over the years to shutdown.

    I was wondering if there is some way to view the shutdown sequence, to see if it's getting hung up on a single item maybe?

    I timed my shutdown and it's at around 5 min in safe mode (minimal) with all services and startup programs disabled.

    Do I have any recourse besides "format C:"?

    Thanks for any help.

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  3. #2
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Welcome to the Lounge!

    Open Device Manager, click on View, then select "Show hidden devices". Many of these hidden devices will not be connected, but Windows has probably loaded drivers for them. Your long shutdown could be a driver issue in that Windows is waiting for a hung driver for a device that's not there.

    Go through all devices, right-click and select "Properties". The Properties will tell you whether the device is connected or not. Uninstall all unconnected devices, then try to shutdown.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2014-08-10 at 21:10. Reason: spelling
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
    Unleash Windows

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    JayHavister22 (2014-08-11)

  5. #3
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    Clicking on the Driver tab will show whether the device is started or not but it would have a yellow alert next to it if it had a problem.

    I normally create a restore point before making any changes in there should Windows have problems reinstating them after the reboot, so it would be worth going back in to see that they have been reinstalled.

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    JayHavister22 (2014-08-11)

  7. #4
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    As mentioned, look for a yellow alert on any drivers etc.

    Run a your real-time malware protection program

    Consider some maintenance items:
    >>> minimize startup items - generally all you need at startup is your real-time malware protection program;
    >>> run disk clean-up at least monthly - after the first disk cleanup search don't click on OK yet - instead click on Cleanup system files - disk cleanup will cycle again - when finished click on OK (I run mine on the weekend before Patch Tuesday),
    >>> go into Internet Options and delete the browsing history with Delete browsing history on exit checked in.
    >>> After those items I would consider running CHKDSK - click on Computer, right-click on the icon for your primary drive which is usually drive C, right-click on Properties,
    you will see a pie chart of the hard drive, notice the ration of the used & free spaces
    then click on the Tools tab, in the error-checking section, click on Check Now, you will see two check disk options show up ( I usually check in both options), click on Start - You will be notified that the computer needs to be restarted, please do so. Upon starting the computer back up, CHKDSK will run automatically; let it finish before using the compute

    Now onto Safe Mode shutdown; are you having issues with Normal Mode?
    Are all of you Windows Updates up-to-date?
    >>> The above items I mentioned are "tune up" items a computer needs but if a deeper approach needs to be considered, it would be good to find out depending on what's going on

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    JayHavister22 (2014-08-11)

  9. #5
    3 Star Lounger KritzX's Avatar
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    Having too many programs and/or too little space on the C: drive, can cause really slow shutdowns. Also, out-of date drivers can cause shutdown woes.
    Fact of Life:

    “Real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time.”
    Terry Pratchett

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    JayHavister22 (2014-08-11)

  11. #6
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    Thank you all for the help so far.

    I checked the device manager, and have no yellow warning triangles on any devices after expanding all categories and turning on hidden devices. Is there a way to print this to a report?

    The drivers to everything I have are up-to-date except for my graphics card for which the latest WHQL driver was released a couple of days ago. The slowdown began long before that, but I'll update that driver tonight just to make sure. The driver in there now is only a couple of months old.

    I like the malware idea, since I've had some pretty strange experiences with malware in the past. That's definitely worth a try. Any suggestions on which program to use?

  12. #7
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    Thanks cmptrgy.
    I think CHKDSK may be a good idea here as well. I haven't run it in quite some time, and I now have 4 HDs in my system....two of which are quite old. It might be high time to just give in and buy a large single drive and just use partitions.

    Everything else, I kind of already do on a semi-regular basis, but it couldn't hurt to do it again now while I'm on the subject.
    Last edited by JayHavister22; 2014-08-11 at 08:39. Reason: could --> couldn't

  13. #8
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    You can use the free version of MBAM for the malware scan https://www.malwarebytes.org/ but just run chkdsk in read-only mode initially without any parameters should there be bad sectors, as running chkdsk with the /r switch will move what data it can to the good areas of the HDD and data can be lost.

    It's best to back up personal stuff first should this be the case.

    You'll probably need to add the drive letter for each chkdsk such as chkdsk c: or d: or whichever.

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