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  1. #1
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    Post Tracking Upload data

    Hi all,
    Can anybody tell me how to check the source(s) of my internet upload data: Recently the total daily amount of upload data on my usage has jumped from a small amount to a very large amount; and I don't know why. I certainly do not upload very much data myself. I suspect a program working in the background is doing so without any knowingly input from myself. I would like to find out which program, if any, is doing this uploading, however I can't find the source. How can I track my upload source in order to manage it or stop it completely.
    TX casso

  2. #2
    3 Star Lounger KritzX's Avatar
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    Perhaps you can use a program like Process Explorer to find out which program is uploading data. Also, check out THIS article.
    Fact of Life:

    “Real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time.”
    Terry Pratchett

  3. #3
    3 Star Lounger KritzX's Avatar
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    Another suggestion would be to use an outbound firewall like Comodo to detect which program is making outbound requests to upload data. Do be aware however, that such kinds of firewalls can be very intrusive to some people, depending on their computer usage, but it's one of the only reliable ways to determine which program is uploading data. Also, many programs require outbound access, so if you see any program name that you're not familiar with, then fire up Google and put in the program's name. Don't try to block programs just because you can't recognize them. Remember, use Google.
    Fact of Life:

    “Real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time.”
    Terry Pratchett

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    I prefer Nir Sofer's NetworkTrafficView as this shows both connections and traffic (including those from the router itself) instead of just processes. In addition, using CTRL+I on a remote connection will use IPNetInfo to get all available info about the remote address, e.g. the 'owner' of the remote IP address. (Download IPNetInfo and stick it in the same folder as NetworkTrafficView.)

    I used NetworkTrafficView to work out that most traffic appeared to be my Cisco router advertising itself on port 1900, part of the uPnP spec and that my PC sends data to Avast and Apple regularly.

    NetworkTrafficView only shows an icon for the originating process so I sometimes have to use CurrPorts as well. CurrPorts is excellent for showing network connections and status but, unfortunately, doesn't show the amount of traffic.

    Hope this helps...

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceR View Post
    I looked at Moo0 Connection Watcher (which your link points to) a while ago but, in my opinion, it wasn't at all accurate. I've just looked at it again and, in my opinion (on my PC at least), the results are no more accurate than the last time I looked at it.

    mooo.jpg
    Click to enlarge

    For example:
    It identifies the iTunes process as "Unknown". Really?
    It identifies "Synergy" (local server and client for keyboard/mouse sharing), "TeamViewer Host" ("always on" remote desktop sharing via internet) and "mDNSResponder" (Apple's Zero Configuration Networking for local devices) as having remote connections to a Techsmith activation domain.

    I tried Techsmith's 'SnagIt' recently but didn't bother continuing to turn the trial into a paid product. Is this the reason for my problems?

    So... is this a fault of Moo0 Connection Watcher or a fault in my PC (given that Nir Sofer's utilities - NetworkTrafficView and CurrPorts - have proven to be more accurate at identifying remote connections)?

    I note that the Moo0 Connection Watcher display appears to only show remote ports, not remote IP addresses. YMMV.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Run a thorough AV/AM scan on your system with at least two different applications, one of them being MBAM.
    Malware and other exploitative nasties can be the biggest cause of bandwidth drain and that certainly includes uploaded bandwidth.

    If your scans keep coming back clean I recommend you look into the Windows 8 start screen side of the OS, as this
    too can be a source for bandwidth sinkholes:

    To ensure that active tiles are placed on a metered type setting or disabled outright:
    How to configure metered connections in Windows 8
    How to Turn Off Live Tiles in Windows 8.1
    Windows 8.1 Tip: Disable App Auto-Update
    [Windows 8] How to decrease data or bandwidth usage (by using ‘metered connection’), and how to turn on ‘airplane mode’

    P2P (peer to peer/file sharing) applications are another potential bandwidth sinkhole. If you share your
    computer with someone else, they may have installed one. Here's a listing of names of such programs:
    Comparison of file sharing applications
    Their names, in many instances, can readily be tracked with Task Manager, or Process Explorer.

    Browsers can eat up a lot of bandwidth too, but usually more toward the download side of things:
    How to Make Your Computer’s Browser Use Less Data When Tethering

    Software applications that you install and use:
    It's a pretty sad state of affairs when you have no idea what those applications you've installed on your computer are actually doing.
    And that might mean going back over all of their documentation and advanced settings to figure out what they're actually doing, and when.
    It stands to reason that you ought to know & have some idea if the applications you've installed are using bandwidth.
    This one you're going to have to figure out yourself.

    For the super paranoid:
    Disable Error Reporting in Windows 8.1, Windows 8 or Windows 7
    Turn automatic updating on or off
    Windows itself can be a source of upload/download bandwidth usage, albeit small, but with all the NSA crap going around these days
    you can never be too careful.
    How to determine what services are running under a SVCHOST.EXE process
    What is svchost.exe And Why Is It Running?
    How to See What Web Sites Your Computer is Secretly Connecting To
    How do I see what's happening on my machine's network connection?

    Not a complete list of tools:
    The Top 20 Free Network Monitoring and Analysis Tools for Sys Admins
    NetLimiter 4
    NetBalancer - Traffic Control and Monitoring Tool
    NirSoft: CurrPorts v2.10 - Monitoring Opened TCP/IP network ports / connections

    Lastly, I use a combination of tools: TCPView, Process Explorer, or any of the other network monitoring tool mentioned.
    Be warned though, all of these tools will require you, in many instances, to do quite a bit of digging around in order to ultimately find some form of causality.
    The process of tracking would be made much easier if you were intimately familiar with many of the installed processes on your machine.
    This would obviously make spotting something amiss much easier, so there's no quick fix and in the end you're going to have do some work.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Motherboard: DX58SO2*Chipset: X58 Express/Intel ICH10*BIOS: SOX5820J.86A.0888.2012.0129.2203*Processor: Intel Core i7 CPU X 990
    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

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