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  1. #1
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    Data Recovery & solid state drive

    In the 9/4/2014 issue of WindowsSecrets newsletter, Michael Lasky wrote about data recovery. He mentioned three free portable recovery apps. I wish he had tested them---the third one on his list has received some bad evaluations.

    But his article got me to thinking about data recovery on a solid state drive. Neither Mr. Lasky nor the tutorials from the three recovery apps mention solid state.

    Does anyone know how a solid state drive fails, and if data can be recovered from one after it fails?


    Harry

  2. #2
    WS Lounge VIP Calimanco's Avatar
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    The causes opf SSD failure:-
    Electronics component failure
    Controller chip failure
    Flash cell degradation
    Data corruption due to power surges or failures
    Damage to printed circuit boards
    Damage to connectors

    If the drive fails, you can no longer access the data. You can use professional (i.e. very expensive) services to recover the data, but the same applies to IDE and SATA drives.
    Recuva works well for recovering lost data on an SSD. EaseUS has also brought out a recovery program allegedly designed for SSDs.

    https://www.piriform.com/recuva

    http://www.easeus.com/data-recovery/...e-recovery.htm

    Always check for bundled unwanted extras when downloading and installing any new software and be sure to decline them. Use custom install when it’s available.
    Last edited by Calimanco; 2014-09-06 at 06:11.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Chances are there will be no data recovery if an SSD fails.

    But this is besides the point, what you really need is a backup regimen that prevents
    any need to have to do that kind of recovery should a drive go bad.

    All the SSD drives I've had fail did so suddenly with little to no warning, with no further access being possible.
    You best outcome would be to create an image of the drive to preserve the OS and all your programs and settings, but move
    all of your valuable data off the drive to another internal drive, or in the case of a laptop, an external drive.
    This is easy and completely doable in all situations.

    Moving the generated data to another drive is the key point here, otherwise you'll be imaging far more frequently than you ever
    actually need to. Data that is moved to another drive should also be backed up to CD/DVD, or external drive as well.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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  4. #4
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    Calimanco:

    Thanks for the info. I have Recuva, but have never had to test it.

    Harry

  5. #5
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    CLiNT:

    Thanks for the info and your experience with SSD. I was afraid it was an all or nothing scenario.

    I do an image backup of my SSD, to a conventional hard drive, on a scheduled basis. I chose to leave all my data on the SSD, but back the data up much more frequently, again to the conventional hard drive.


    Harry

  6. #6
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hmw View Post
    I do an image backup of my SSD, to a conventional hard drive, on a scheduled basis. I chose to leave all my data on the SSD, but back the data up much more frequently, again to the conventional hard drive.
    The most important point to remember regardless of drive type: drive failure is a matter of when, not if. For truly critical data such as financial/investment data, etc. one needs backup in addition to another internal/external hard drive.

    My financial data gets backed up daily to DVD. My email accounts are configured to leave a copy of all email on the server, unless I delete the email. And follow my signature tagline in red; you won't regret it.

    As for Recuva, I have used it - for other folks - and it is good. Follow Clint's and my advice (and a host of other members) and you won't need to use it, either.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

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  7. #7
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    bbearren:

    Thanks for driving the point home. I understand.

    BTW, I use an old DOS program to maintain all my financial records. In addition to saving the data on both my hard drives, I also back it up on floppies---remember those?


    Harry

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