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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger Lou Sander's Avatar
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    Eliminate Page Number on Cover Page - Word 2010

    I have a document with a Cover, preliminary pages numbered i-iv, and main pages numbered 1-101. To make the page numbering work out, I've used sections and the Page Number control on the Header & Footer section of the Insert tab.

    Everything is exactly as I want it, except that the Cover still has a page number at the bottom. When I click Remove Page Numbers, ALL the page numbers are removed.

    How do I get rid of the page number on the Cover Page? (In previous versons of Word I've covered it with a small white graphic, which works fine. But it seems there should be a more direct way to do it.

    Who can help?
    Lou Sander
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    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Lou,

    Click Insert -> Cover Page
    Select a format (you can edit the format latter to make it look like you want)
    You'll notice that the 2nd physical page now has a page number of 1 or i depending on your formatting.

    HTH
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    Lou Sander (2014-09-12)

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    5 Star Lounger Lou Sander's Avatar
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    Most excellent. Thanks!
    Lou Sander
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    5 Star Lounger Lou Sander's Avatar
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    I just inserted my cover page. It isn't easy to get rid of all the formatted junk that Microsoft designers think I want on my cover pages.

    How do I create a plain, blank cover page that I can select when I insert a cover page? Also, how can I get rid of all the unwanted pages in the Gallery? Help doesn't help.
    Lou Sander
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    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Lou,

    To make you own:
    1. Create a new Blank Document
    2. Add some text, e.g. My Blank Cover Page
    3. Highlight that text
    4. Click the Cover Page dropdown arrow
    5. Click: Save Selection to Cover Page Gallery... (which is no longer grayed out)
      coverpg.JPG
    6. Done...well almost!
      Coverpg2.JPG
    7. When you Exit Word make sure you Save your changes!
      Coverpg4.JPG


    To manage what shows up in the gallery:
    1. Click the Cover Page dropdown arrow
    2. Right-Click any cover page
    3. Click: Organize and Delete...
      Coverpg3.JPG
    4. Select and delete from the list
    5. Note: I'm not sure but this is most likely a permanent deletion of that cover page.

    HTH
    Last edited by RetiredGeek; 2014-09-12 at 13:59.
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  8. #6
    5 Star Lounger Lou Sander's Avatar
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    I figured out most of that stuff on my own, mostly after blundering into the "Organize and Delete" menu selection. Your screen shots will be very helpful to others with the same problem.

    I ended up deleting all but three of the built-in cover pages. That gives me one row of Built-Ins in the Gallery, followed by one row of "General" cover pages, currently consisting of the single simple page that I saved.
    Lou Sander
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    This is a common section-related issue. RetiredGeek's method will work, but as you've seen it requires you to edit out what you don't want.

    This method gives you all the control, and should give you insight into how sections work with header/footers.

    1. Position the cursor at the beginning of your document (i.e. at the start of your page i).

    2. Page Layout > Breaks > Section Breaks, Next page (or odd page if you want the next section to start on a facing page in a 2-sided job). You'll now have an empty new section 1, and you'll see it starts with page i. If the starting number of your original page i is now page ii, use the Insert > Page Number > Format Page Numbers... dialog to change the radio button from "Continue from previous section" to "Start at: 1". (If the page number was already "i", it means you already did this earlier.)

    3. Double-click within your page header/footer to bring up the Header & Footer Tools. Click the "Link to Previous" button to disconnect this section's header (or footer) definition from the previous one. The "Same as Previous" indicator will disappear.

    4. Now click the "Previous" button to display the header (or footer) for the new section you inserted. Select it and delete it, then click the red X to close the header/footer.

    You can now create your cover page in the new section 1.

    The key here is to remember that header/footers are connected to the previous section by default and that inserting a new section will inherit the header/footers from the existing section. You already managed the page numbering to go from i, ii, iii... to 1, 2, 3... by using the Format Page Numbers dialog. However, unless you disconnect section 2's header/footer from that of the new section 1 you inserted, deleting it from the new section will also remove it from what was originally your first section.

    As is often the case with Word, it takes more to explain it than to do it!

  10. #8
    Silver Lounger Charles Kenyon's Avatar
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    I agree with Eric that long term you are better off learning to manipulate sections, page numbers, and headers and footers, than playing with Word's Cover Page feature.

    Sections, Headers and Footers and Page Numbers
    Working With Sections (or why does Word do that?)

    On the other hand, creating your own cover page could be a time saver.
    Automated Boilerplate Using Microsoft Word
    Last edited by Charles Kenyon; 2014-09-13 at 08:56.
    Charles Kyle Kenyon
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  12. #9
    5 Star Lounger Lou Sander's Avatar
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    All good points. If you know how to work with Sections, you have a powerful tool at your disposal. Unfortunately, it involves a long and winding learning curve.

    BTW, Word 2003's Status Bar included a display of page numbers within the sections. That made it easy to print, for example, pages 2 and 3 of section 18. I don't see a way to get that in Word 2010.

    Finagling sections to remove the page number from the cover page takes several not-too-intuitive steps. Now that I've made and saved my own "plain" cover page, I think I'll mostly be using it, instead of twiddling with sections.

    With the hindsight provided by this journey, I'm thinking that Word's cover page feature is mostly for people who WANT to use fancy cover pages. You get a bunch of pre-designed ones, and they are easy to insert and modify. It would be good if Microsoft had included one or two "plain" cover pages at the start of their gallery.

    And actually, my former method of covering the page number with an opaque white graphic was a pretty good, though inelegant, solution.
    Last edited by Lou Sander; 2014-09-13 at 12:30.
    Lou Sander
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    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Lou,

    Just right-click on the status bar and make your selections.
    louS.JPG
    HTH
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  14. #11
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    Learning how to use sections effectively does have a steep learning curve Lou, but the benefits are worth it if you use Word to prepare books. The setup each time is tedious though, so I start with a 19-section boilerplate document that I’ve already set up for each of the possible book structures I may need. I can use the Page Setup dialog to adjust the dimensions and choose “Whole document” in the Apply to setting to have them apply to all sections at once.

    Following are the sections in my boilerplate document (copied from the documentation I maintain within it):

    1. Half title page: empty header/footers
    2. Title page: starts odd page; empty header/footers disconnected from previous; pg# continue from previous section
    3. Copyright page: starts next page; empty header/footers disconnected from previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page contents
    4. Dedication & epigraph pages: starts odd page; empty header/footers disconnected from previous; pg# continue from previous section
    5. Table of Contents: starts odd page; header/footers disconnected from previous; pg# format=i, ii, iii…; pg# continue from previous section; 1st pg footer with ctrd page #, even pg header with left page #, odd pg header with right pg#; boilerplate Contents heading + TOC field code with my preferred switch settings
    6. List of Figures: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading + TOC field code with my preferred switch settings to collect figure titles
    7. List of Tables: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading + TOC field code with my preferred switch settings to collect table titles
    8. Foreword: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
    9. Preface: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
    10. Acknowledgments: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
    11. First section of main body: starts odd page; header/footers disconnected from previous; pg# format=1, 2, 3…; pg# start at 1; 1st pg footer with ctrd page #, even pg header with left page #, odd pg header with right pg#
    12. Second section of main body: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section
    13. Afterword: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
    14. Appendix title page: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading + TOC field code with my preferred switch settings
    15. Notes: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
    16. Bibliography: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
    17. Contributors: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
    18. Index: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; Index heading and INDEX field code with my preferred switch settings
    19. Colophon: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading

    This setup allows me to delete any sections I don’t need for a particular project. The sections are set up for my preferred style for numbering and having new elements begin on a right-facing page. I typically include field codes to insert the chapter title automatically in even page headers and the book title in odd page headers adjacent to the page number. My typical 1st page header is a fixed space with extra space after to push the chapter start down on the page, and the 1st page footer contains just a centered page number.

    Notes:
    • By default, the first section in the front matter will be page i, so if I eliminate the half-title page, the title page will become i. However, the page number will only appear when a header or footer includes it; in my case, at the start of the table of contents.
    • Including the two main body sections ensures that the page numbering will continue after the first one. I can start additional chapters by inserting a new odd page section—and it will inherit all of the attributes of the previous section.
    • Be sure to use Page Setup’s Layout tab to turn on the “Different odd and even” and Different first page” checkboxes to be able to use all three types of page header/footers for double-sided printing.
    • You need to have a minimum of 3 empty pages to define the 1st, odd, and even page header/footers (you can delete the page breaks after defining the header/footers).
    • The various style definitions used for my boilerplate headings (Foreword, Preface, chapter starts, etc.) all include a “Style for following paragraph” to ensure that the correct style is used for the 1st ¶ after the included boilerplate wording. (In fact, mine typically uses the Body Text First Indent style—and since its definition uses Body Text as the “Style for following paragraph”, I won't have to specifically apply styles until I need quite a different style.)
    • My boilerplate document includes a bookmark named “IncludeInTOC” spans from the Foreword through to the end of the Colophon section so it can be used with the TOC field code’s \b switch to include only pages within the named bookmark's range.
    • My boilerplate Appendices section includes a TOC field code set up to collect page numbers from headings specific to the appendices. This allows me to generate a separate table of contents for the appendices if applicable.
    • If you use Word Options > Advanced > Show document content to turn on "Show bookmarks" and set Field shading= Always (to show the content of field codes with a grey highlight), these automation entities will be easier to notice. (The above includes 4 tables of contents + and index field code, as well as additional field codes within the page headers and footers. Having them show as obvious field codes reduces the risk of accidentally deleting them or overlooking the need to alter them.)


    I realize this post is a bit long, but hopefully it can be a useful guideline for how to use Word sections.

  15. #12
    5 Star Lounger Lou Sander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetiredGeek View Post
    Lou,

    Just right-click on the status bar and make your selections.
    louS.JPG
    HTH
    Yeah, but there isn't any selection to display the page number within the section (s7p5, etc.). I couldn't check it thoroughly, but I think the Print dialog may have changed so one doesn't need that. It looks like you select a page range to print, and it uses the actual page numbers when deciding what to print. I think it used to count the page numbers from the first page, even if your document changed page numbers within itself. (Like switching from i, ii, iii to 1, 2, 3).
    Lou Sander
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  16. #13
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Lou,

    When specifying print ranges you use the section number and the actual page numbers displayed.
    louS.JPG

    For Example: To print this one VBA routine which spans 2 pages (contained in a single section) I would enter the page range as p60s57-p61s57
    pagerange.JPG

    HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

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  17. #14
    5 Star Lounger Lou Sander's Avatar
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    EricFletcher: You've sure put together a stellar foundation for doing books. Most of my projects are under a hundred pages or so, and no two are (usually) alike. So I end up working with the sections on an ad hoc basis. It IS frustrating sometimes.
    Lou Sander
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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