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  1. #1
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    Angry Compressing pictures in Word 2013

    I have a Word 2013 document with pictures which takes at least 2 minutes to fully open. I have learnt that it is possible to compress graphics to make them smaller in size. I started familiarising myself using on-line tutorials including YouTube guides. I must be doing something wrong as when I save the Word document, it is still the same size.
    I later discovered that by going to the File/Advanced options a few extra settings are in order, I checked 'discard editing data' and unchecked 'do not compress...' and set the default target to the lowest possible value.
    To cut a long story short; the Word document size had the opposite effect (it grew by 2KB).

    What am I doing wrong? Why is Word being so stubborn?
    Please bear in mind that I know nothing/zilch about picture compression.

  2. #2
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    Using Microsoft Word's image compression algorithms is not a great idea. Suffice to say, the built-in compression tools seem to have plenty of people who find they don't work as expected. My own experience is that it 'used' to work on earlier versions and you may need to temporarily convert the document to doc format to get the result you expected.

    Even if you could get it to work seamlessly, the result will likely be inferior to the result you could obtain by using software specialised for the purpose eg Photoshop or the many cheaper/free alternatives. Typically, big file sizes are driven by only a few of the images in the document and so it is likely you don't need to rightsize 'every' image file to fix your problem. If you don't know much about picture compression then you may want to do some research about image resolution and what is an acceptable resolution to use in your documents. This does depend on the type of image and the plans for outputting the image (screen only or printing). The physical size of the image in the final layout is also important because it relates to the image resolution.

    It is a lot quicker for me to fix the issues than it is to fully explain the whys and wherefores of what needs to be done. If you can make your document available to me then I can have a look and give you explicit instructions on how you can make major savings to the file size without visible reduction in graphic quality.
    Andrew Lockton, Chrysalis Design, Melbourne Australia

  3. #3
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    Thanks for your input & offer Andrew. After posting my initial message I have located freeware (balesio) which seems to suit my needs.

  4. #4
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    That looks like an interesting product and worth exploring. Let me know how you get on with it.
    Andrew Lockton, Chrysalis Design, Melbourne Australia

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Lockton View Post
    That looks like an interesting product and worth exploring. Let me know how you get on with it.
    I have used this last night and it works; the only down side is that it only works with JPEG's.
    The picture gets reduced in terms of mega/kilobytes but to the naked eye, stays the same size as the original. It can also handle multiple files too.

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