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  1. #1
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    Updated motherboard in older Gateway failed

    So I decided it was time to replace the mobo in my old Gateway backup rig.
    Its a 2008 GM5410E with a clunky old OEM Intel DG965OT motherboard, running a quad core Q6600.
    I swapped in a Gigabyte G31M-ES2L with a Q6600 in it (o/c'd to 3.00 GHz) and 2 x 2 GB DDR2 800 ram.
    All the other hardware in the Gateway is the same, including the DVD drive, the HDD with Vista HP 32 bit installed, and was running just fine.
    I figured this would be PnP. Wrong!

    It posted fine, then Windows went to repair mode, and said it was attempting repairs.
    After several minutes it said it could not make repairs.
    I looked at the repair log and it completed several system checks successfully; but the last one said the registry was corrupt.
    Huh? How did that happen?

    I figure I have a few options:
    1. Swap the original doggy mobo back in. (Not a desirable option)
    2. Try to upgrade to Vista Enterprise 64 bit from the DVD drive; I have the DVD.
    3. Upgrade to Win 7 HP x 64 bit from the DVD drive; again I have the DVD.

    Anyone got any other ideas or suggestions?
    I hoped to have it running happily with Vista 32 bit, then upgrade later.
    I am completely stumped.

    Thanks,
    rstew

  2. #2
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Are we talking about a motherboard failure, or a failure to perform a clean install with a new motherboard?
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2014-09-29 at 06:19.
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  3. #3
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    If you took an existing, working machine and just replaced the motherboard, Windows will not work and you may have corrupted your Windows installation. This is caused by having a different disk controller and Windows no longer knows where the files are located.
    I suggest you backup the hard disk via another machine before going any further.
    Then re-install the old mobo and confirm that it boots and runs. If so, take an image backup that can be restored to "bare metal" using one of the many backup products - you will probably have to buy one to get the "restore to bare metal" option.
    Now you can put the new mobo in and restore to bare metal.

    cheers, Paul

  4. #4
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    Clint
    Both mobo's worked fine beforehand.
    The problem must be different disk controllers as Paul says.
    Paul;
    I had no idea disk controllers were different
    Another example of how what you don't know can bite you hard!
    I think I will try connecting the drive to the original mobo on the bench and hope it will boot up ok. If so then I will make a copy of it using Macrium.
    Guess I should have done that in the first place!

    Thanks,
    rstew

  5. #5
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    In addition to the disk controller there's a different CPU, different brand motherboard, different video, etc., and it's enough to make Windows think it's a new computer and require activation all over again. And it's possible the Product Key for a Gateway will not work on what is now a Custom computer. I've tried it and Microsoft Activation site would only say to contact the OEM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berton View Post
    In addition to the disk controller there's a different CPU, different brand motherboard, different video, etc., and it's enough to make Windows think it's a new computer and require activation all over again. And it's possible the Product Key for a Gateway will not work on what is now a Custom computer. I've tried it and Microsoft Activation site would only say to contact the OEM.
    If I was to boot up with Vista Enterprise 64 bit (non-OEM) from the DVD drive, and upgrade to this (registered etc.), would I still be able to access all my old data files on the old drive? Or would they be scrambled in the process?
    I would wind up with all the original hardware, except the mobo which is the Gigabyte G31M-ES2L, and the Q6600, which is the same except o/c'd to 3.0 GHz.
    The HDD would be the same original one, as would the card reader, DVD-RW drive, and the case of course.

    Sorry if my questions seem elementary, but I just don't want to mess up anything more than I already have.

    rstew

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    Just unplug the old drive until after getting Windows installed and running then plug it back in to retrieve your data. Programs will have to be reinstalled so as to create the icons/shortcuts, copy files to the proper place such as in Program Files or Program Files (x86) [if installing the 64-bit OS], support files in the Windows Folder/subFolders and Registry items created so Windows knows how to run the programs. Before installing those programs do all the updates and Service Packs 1 and 2.

    As to devices, the sound, video [if using the built-in adapter], Network adapter, etc., are on the motherboard, you'll probably need to download some drivers from the board maker's site if you don't have the CD that came with the board.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berton View Post
    Just unplug the old drive until after getting Windows installed and running then plug it back in to retrieve your data. Programs will have to be reinstalled so as to create the icons/shortcuts, copy files to the proper place such as in Program Files or Program Files (x86) [if installing the 64-bit OS], support files in the Windows Folder/subFolders and Registry items created so Windows knows how to run the programs. Before installing those programs do all the updates and Service Packs 1 and 2.

    As to devices, the sound, video [if using the built-in adapter], Network adapter, etc., are on the motherboard, you'll probably need to download some drivers from the board maker's site if you don't have the CD that came with the board.
    Berton;
    So are we saying that simply upgrading to Vista 64 bit, on the same drive, may render the non-windows data unrecoverable?
    The video driver and network driver at least seem to be fine without needing patch drivers. Not sure about sound, but I am guessing its OK too.

    Thanks,
    rstew

  9. #9
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    If you have an available hard drive (we'll call it Drive B), remove the current drive (Drive A) and put in Drive B. Install Windows to Drive B. Once it is completely installed and working, power down and plug in Drive A, and power up. Drive A will become the secondary drive, and you should be able to copy all of your data from Drive A to Drive B.

  10. #10
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    As for your data, it'll depend upon the type of install, upgrading should change the data but a 'clean' install usually wipes the HDD first and the date could be lost. As mentioned, copy your data, what you created or that exists nowhere else, to another device or drive.

    If you are changing from 32-bit WinXP to 64-bit Windows it will have to be a clean install. Only the Professional version of WinXP was available as either type.

    And don't confuse drive lettering, A and B are reserved for floppy drives by the BIOS.

  11. #11
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    So as to reduce the scare factor I wound up just swapping back in the old mobo. A gigantic step backward!
    Anyway everything works as it did.
    I can now fully backup all my data files, then maybe try the swap again another day.
    Thanks all!

    rstew

  12. #12
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Either use the bare metal image, as Paul suggests, or do a full clean install.
    This is something that needs to be planned.

    Personally, I think you will need to dump that Gateway OEM install disk and perform a clean install with a
    genuine Windows install disk with it's OWN activation key.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2014-09-30 at 20:41.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rstew View Post
    ...then Windows went to repair mode, and said it was attempting repairs. After several minutes it said it could not make repairs. I looked at the repair log and it completed several system checks successfully; but the last one said the registry was corrupt...
    I have dealt with this problem many times (fit new motherboard, but Windows doesn't want to play). Each time I was able to get Windows (XP and later) running by performing a repair-reinstall (see Fred Langa's "Win7's no-reformat, non-destructive reinstall" article in Windows Secrets Newsletter, Issue 297, 2011-07-14 - although the article refers to Win7 the procedure is much the same for Vista).

    This allows you to keep all your files/programs/email etc. The most likely cause of Vista failing to work w/ the new motherboard is incompatible drivers in the Vista installation on your HDD; the repair-reinstall will, among other things, replace such incompatible drivers.

    1. Boot from your Vista installation DVD (must be same service pack, i.e.: if the Vista installed on your HDD is SP2 then the DVD needs to have SP2).

    2. In the first "Install Windows" dialog set your language etc. then click "Next".

    3. In the second "Install Windows" dialog click on "Install now".

    4. In the third "Install Windows" dialog enter your Vista product key (and optionally un-tick the "Automatically activate..." checkbox) then click "Next".

    5. In the fourth "Install Windows" dialog tick the "I accept the license terms" checkbox then click "Next".

    6. In the fifth "Install Windows" dialog hopefully the "Upgrade" choice will be available, if so then click on "Upgrade" after which respond appropriately to any further prompts.

    Note that the "Upgrade" choice will keep your files/programs/email but the "Clean Install" choice will trash everything and revert Vista to out-of-box state.
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