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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger petesmst's Avatar
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    Looking After Your SSD: Sound Advice?

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  2. #2
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Not sure that turning off the indexing service is such a good idea. AFAIK from Vista on the indexing service is used by Explorer; turning it off is likely to cause your system to slow down.

    Take note that SSDs work very differently to "conventional" HDDs. SSDs do not need to be defragmented, in fact according to the SSD manufacturers defragmenting an SSD will shorten its life and might even kill it outright.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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  3. #3
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Not sure that turning off the indexing service is such a good idea
    I agree. I have an SSD on my laptop and keep indexing enabled. I makes finding programs much quicker than sorting through the Start Menu or Start Screen. The impact on the SSD lifespan is minimal. You'll be ready for a new one by the time it wears out.

    Jerry

  4. #4
    5 Star Lounger
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    are you sure

    i was led to believe that it would wear out the indexing 'tracks' faster

    side note
    back in dos
    one bbs wore off the magnetic material from the first track of a floppy drive
    because the heads always started there to find anything

    wouldnt something similar happen to ssds ?

    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    I agree. I have an SSD on my laptop and keep indexing enabled. I makes finding programs much quicker than sorting through the Start Menu or Start Screen. The impact on the SSD lifespan is minimal. You'll be ready for a new one by the time it wears out.

    Jerry

  5. #5
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Reading from and SSD has no effect on wear, only writes. If you disable all writes, your SSD will last forever. In my opinion, search indexing will not put an exceptional load on the SSD any more than booting or normal operation. .

    Jerry

  6. #6
    3 Star Lounger
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    In theory, reading does not alter life of SSD. Only write cycles do.

    In reading, it senses the voltage of the memory cell only. In writing, it alters the states as well as physical properties of the memory cell. This affects life of the cell.

    In rotating memory devices (hard drive, floppy), wear and tear start as soon as powering up. Also the head of the hard drive or floppy could accidentally hit a spot, or land on it (head crash). It may cause damage to that spot, thus losing the 'memory cells' there. Embedded firmware of the hard drive repairs this by moving data to other places. When too many damaged spots, there is only so much it can repair.

    So in reading, hard drive and floppy still has a chance to do damage, but not SSD.

    Though the head of hard drive is very good quality, the ever small stray of magnetism is still left. When moving over the same spot over and over again, it might demagnetizes the spot, slowly damaging data integrity, over many many cycles. No so in SSD.
    (Note: This demagnetizing effect is minimal compared to total life of a hard drive. It is here to compare in theory. SSD does not even have this.)

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