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  1. #1
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    Why 32 Bit and 64 Bit in Windows ?

    Actually I want to know about these application. It is essential for windows that 64 Bit is better then 32? Please give me a good knowledge about them.

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    32 and 64 bit describes the CPU architecture. Running native 64 bit applications, including the OS, on a 64 bit CPU should be faster and more efficient than running 32 bit software. See this Wikipedia article.

    cheers, Paul

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Basically it comes down to advancements made in hardware.
    If you research this you will find there once existed 8 and 16 bit architectures as well, but they are now largely obsolete.

    64 bit computing allows one to take advantage of a greater degrees of hardware resources, like
    more memory for instance, than a 32 bit architecture.
    Software will always be secondary as it will always follow advancements in hardware.

    64 bit computing will eventually dominate as 32 bit fades into obsolescence and 128 bit computing
    begins to make an appearance from over the horizon.
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    Why 64bit windows is better?

    A computer with a 64-bit version of Windows can use more memory. With more memory, you can keep more files and programs open at once without slowing down your computer. Its efficiency is faster than 32-bit and have more advanced security features.

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    If your system has 4 GB or less memory there is no real advantage to 64-bit Windows.

    A 32-bit system can only address 4GB of memory so if you have more than that, the additional memory will not be used.

    In order to work with the widest variety of systems, M$ offers both 32 and 64-bit versions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nate01pa View Post
    If your system has 4 GB or less memory there is no real advantage to 64-bit Windows.

    A 32-bit system can only address 4GB of memory so if you have more than that, the additional memory will not be used.

    In order to work with the widest variety of systems, M$ offers both 32 and 64-bit versions.
    Actually, with 4GB it may still make sense to use Windows x64. I have found Windows 64 bits allows more usable memory with 4 GB than Windows x86, on the very same hardware.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CLiNT View Post
    ...

    64 bit computing will eventually dominate as 32 bit fades into obsolescence and 128 bit computing
    begins to make an appearance from over the horizon...

    It might help to understand what is meant by "64bit", "32bit", etc.

    A "bit" is the basic data-unit in computing. In practise a "bit" can be a 0 (zero) or a 1.

    A 0 (zero) bit can be thought of as: negative (electromagnetic), false (boolean), etc.

    A 1 bit can be thought of as: positive, true, etc.

    If you saw a print-out of some binary code you would see just a very long sequence of 0 and 1 arranged in an incomprehensible (to us) fashion. E.g.: "11001110" might be binary code for the letter "a" (it probably isn't, I'm just using this as an example).

    "64bit", "32bit", etc., refers to "data-width", i.e.: the number of "bits" the computer's CPU/motherboard/RAM can process at one instant of time.

    So a computer which has "64bit architechture" can handle twice as many (64) bits in each "instruction" as a computer with "32bit architechture" (just as an 8-lane highway can handle twice as much traffic as a 4-lane highway).

    Of course, to take full advantage of the extra capacity of 64bit vs. 32bit, etc., the software must be capable of communicating with the hardware using the same "bitness".

    As Sir Harry Secombe (Neddy Seagoon in the BBC's "Goonshow") once said, "this is all very confusing really".
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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