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  1. #1
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    More questions about upgrading from Vista to Win7

    So I have my custom built shop rig up and running nicely on Win7 x 64bit. Everything works great and I am happy with it. (Thanks to many on the forum for all the valualble information and suggestions! )

    Now I am back to wanting to upgrade my office Gateway rig from Vista 32 bit to Win7 64 bit.
    I have already upgraded the cpu and a few other tweaks to the point where it works well enough.
    It has two drives so I am thinking first do a complete backup of the C: drive to the D: drive using Macrium Reflect.
    Then I am thinking to do an upgrade install using Win7 to replace Vista on the C: drive.
    That way if something goes wrong I can always reformat C: and do a clean install, then copy over the data that I need from D; as well as reinstall the other software.
    If it goes well I am thinking that all software and data will still be intact on the C: drive after the upgrade, correct?

    I have one major concern.
    The original Vista is loaded down with Gateway OEM garbage that I dont want loaded.
    Will the Win7 upgrade bypass all this crud and give me an otherwise clean install?
    Is there any way short of wiping the drive that I can get a clean Win7 upgrade install?

    Thanks again,
    rstew

  2. #2
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    Stew (or is it R),

    You can't go from 32-bit to 64-bit by way of an upgrade install and still have your programs function.
    You'll need to do a full install, then install all your programs again. The plan to make a backup is a good one, however, just in case something goes sideways.

    Zig

  3. #3
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    Personally I wouldn't do an upgrade anyway. They frequently have problems and end up requiring a clean install to fix the mess.
    Joe

  4. #4
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    I have one major concern.
    The original Vista is loaded down with Gateway OEM garbage that I dont want loaded.
    Will the Win7 upgrade bypass all this crud and give me an otherwise clean install?
    Is there any way short of wiping the drive that I can get a clean Win7 upgrade install?
    Just do the clean install and you can start off free from any of the OEM attachments.
    Just make the install as part of a PLANNED affair and download all the drivers and
    make arrangement to have ALL of you main program exe's readily available.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CLiNT View Post
    Just do the clean install and you can start off free from any of the OEM attachments.
    Just make the install as part of a PLANNED affair and download all the drivers and
    make arrangement to have ALL of you main program exe's readily available.
    Sound advice Clint!
    I think it sounds like it would be more trouble than it's worth, so I will just leave it running Vista until I retire it completely, like Joe suggested.
    I forgot that upgrading to 64 bit would be a messy affair requiring the re-installation of all software. That is more trouble than I need!

    Thanks all
    rstew

  6. #6
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    32-bit is also an option that works just as well or better than 64-bit, especially on older systems; unless you need more than 3.5 gigs of RAM for some specific reason.

  7. #7
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    I forgot that upgrading to 64 bit would be a messy affair requiring the re-installation of all software. That is more trouble than I need!
    Not to mention all the drivers that are compatible with 64-bit [most or all of them].

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by F.U.N. downtown View Post
    32-bit is also an option that works just as well or better than 64-bit, especially on older systems; unless you need more than 3.5 gigs of RAM for some specific reason.
    The current oem install is 32 bit and it's working fine so I will just leave it alone. I don't have a 32 bit non-oem version. The idea originally was to get rid of the oem install with all its bloatware, whilst upgrading to 64 bit, but doing a clean rebuild just plain is not worth the trouble.
    "If it ain't broke don't fix it!"

    Thanks all,
    rstew
    Last edited by rstew; 2014-10-13 at 11:33.

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  10. #9
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    If the Gateway "bloatware" includes programs you have never used and never want to use then go ahead and uninstall them. Or, if bloatware is loading whenever Windows boots up, you can use msconfig to disable them from running at startup. In fact, you can use the Tools option in the free CCleaner app to disable startup items easily. As a side note, we have a 3 year-old ASUS laptop and i just discovered that one of the included ASUS apps which i assumed was bloatware has proven to be very useful!

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rstew View Post
    ... The idea originally was to get rid of the oem install with all its bloatware ...
    Uninstalling the OEM bloatware should not be that big a problem. I do it all the time when I set up brand new computers for my customers.
    Eike J Heinze
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  12. #11
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rstew View Post
    ...The idea originally was to get rid of the oem install with all its bloatware...
    You might find "PC Decrapifier" helpful to get rid of the bloatware (see http://pcdecrapifier.com/download).

    I am running both 32bit and 64bit versions of Win7 (also 2 PCs with Vista 32bit). I have not seen any significant difference in performance w/ 64bit on two-to-four year-old PCs. The only real advantage w/ 64bit on such older PCs is the ability to run more than 4GB RAM, but the chances are that the PC's other hardware can't take advantage of 64bit in any case.

    You have the option to simply give your Vista 32bit install a good clean-up then upgrade it to Win7 (32bit), which should allow you to keep your files/programs. You would need a Win7 32bit installation DVD (entering a product key during the upgrade is not mandatory, setup allows you to skip entering a product key; you can enter the product key once you are happy the upgrade is successful).

    I have upgraded Vista to Win7 on several customer's PCs, but have always created a backup image of their Vista before running the upgrade. In one case the upgrade succeeded but there were no Win7-compatible video or network drivers available for that laptop (Acer). All the other upgrades were successful.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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  13. #12
    jwoods
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    You might also consider using Laplink's PC Mover software...

    http://www.laplink.com/index.php/ind...ature-overview

    Instead of backing up the C: drive to the D: drive, install Win 7 on the D: and use PC Mover to selectively load the programs, files, and settings, from the Vista drive to the Win 7 drive.

    It worked pretty well for me when I went from a Win XP desktop to a Win 7 Pro laptop recently.

    I won't say you won't have to re-install anything, but I think I had only one or two programs that needed to be.

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwoods View Post
    You might also consider using Laplink's PC Mover software...

    http://www.laplink.com/index.php/ind...ature-overview

    Instead of backing up the C: drive to the D: drive, install Win 7 on the D: and use PC Mover to selectively load the programs, files, and settings, from the Vista drive to the Win 7 drive.

    It worked pretty well for me when I went from a Win XP desktop to a Win 7 Pro laptop recently.

    I won't say you won't have to re-install anything, but I think I had only one or two programs that needed to be.
    This sounds like it might work nicely!
    Thanks for the link.

    rstew

  15. #14
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    Drivers (Vista to Win 7)

    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    You might find "PC Decrapifier" helpful to get rid of the bloatware (see http://pcdecrapifier.com/download).

    I am running both 32bit and 64bit versions of Win7 (also 2 PCs with Vista 32bit). I have not seen any significant difference in performance w/ 64bit on two-to-four year-old PCs. The only real advantage w/ 64bit on such older PCs is the ability to run more than 4GB RAM, but the chances are that the PC's other hardware can't take advantage of 64bit in any case.

    You have the option to simply give your Vista 32bit install a good clean-up then upgrade it to Win7 (32bit), which should allow you to keep your files/programs. You would need a Win7 32bit installation DVD (entering a product key during the upgrade is not mandatory, setup allows you to skip entering a product key; you can enter the product key once you are happy the upgrade is successful).

    I have upgraded Vista to Win7 on several customer's PCs, but have always created a backup image of their Vista before running the upgrade. In one case the upgrade succeeded but there were no Win7-compatible video or network drivers available for that laptop (Acer). All the other upgrades were successful.
    First, agreed on your recommendation for PC Decrapifier and your observation that 32-bit is fine unless it wastes installed memory above 4 GB. In fact, I make it my standard policy to install a 32-bit version of Windows on anything having less than 3.5 GB, as it is also likely that all data structures in the OS software components will use less memory (than their 64-bit equivalents), and thus leave more for applications.

    Finally, please check out "Double Driver" at http://www.boozet.org/ (or many download sites such as Softpedia, Snapfiles, PC World, Cnet, etc.). It can save drivers from an active Windows installation, then restore them on a new installation (or on new but identical hardware). It can save only non-MS drivers, only MS drivers, or all of them, and you can restore selectively only one or more drivers, as you wish.

    When no Windows 7 drivers exist for some hardware components, but Vista drivers are installed and functional on the machine you wish to upgrade, and considering the likely compatibility of those Vista drivers on Win 7, you may find "Double Driver" a very handy tool! It has served me well on many occasions.

  16. #15
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rhl2000 View Post
    ...Finally, please check out "Double Driver" at http://www.boozet.org/ (or many download sites such as Softpedia, Snapfiles, PC World, Cnet, etc.). It can save drivers from an active Windows installation...
    Problem is that when I look at the "Double Driver" website I see that the latest release dates to August 2010.

    I tend to be careful about running programs that old.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
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