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    New Lounger websquad's Avatar
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    Updating to larger SSD - Steps?

    I have a new SSD that is almost twice the capacity of my old SSD that I'm using for the sys drive. I have no special migration tools (such as Norton Ghost). What steps should I take after doing an image backup of C: to my USB-connected hard drive, and after making a recovery disk?

    Windows 7 Pro 64-bit, 8 GB RAM.
    Last edited by websquad; 2014-10-23 at 12:18. Reason: Config.

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    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Websquad,

    I just went through this about a week ago.
    1. Make an Image Backup with Macrium Reflect Free (Be sure to create the Windows PE Recovery Media you'll need it).
    2. Go through the separate Verification step required in the Free version ( If you purchase the Premium version, well worth the price IMHO, there is an option to have this done automatically)
    3. Shutdown your machine and install the new SSD.
    4. Boot from the Windows PE Recovery Media.
    5. Restore each partition separately in order.
    6. When you get to the C: partition use the options to increase the size to use up your new space.
    7. Done.

    HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

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    I suppose you are using Windows native imaging. You could image the SSD, disconnect it, connect the new one, boot from the recovery disk and restore the image to the drive. You may need to change the partition size, afterwards, though, but it should be relatively straightforward.

    Of course, you can also use of the free imaging tools, such as Macrium Reflect Free or EaseUS Todo Backup to create the image, boot using their own recovery disks and then restore the images done with either of them, but it will probably not be necessary.
    Rui
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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Yeah, that's what I would do; Create a new image to the external drive, disconnect the old SSD drive, connect the
    new one, then restore the image to the new drive.
    You'll need to boot to a bootable disk (USB stick or DVD disk) with the imaging app included, be it MS default or any third party app.

    Third party imaging apps are better imo, but the default W7 MS imaging should work too.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CLiNT View Post
    ...but the default W7 MS imaging should work too.
    I have used the "W7 MS imaging" (restore disk) a couple of times to restore a W7 image to a different drive, but found it tricky and it had some limitations.

    The suggested "create image to external drive/restore image to new drive" method seems like going from London, UK, to Paris, France, via New York, USA!

    Using BootIt Bare Metal I can copy partitions from one drive to another then resize to suit (or "slide" if necessary). Full control; create/delete/image/change MBR & BCD settings, apart from being a bullet-proof boot manager (when installed to a partition on the drive - best to use a separate 8MB FAT partition).
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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    WS Lounge VIP Calimanco's Avatar
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    Why do we always over complicate things. Clone the old drive to the new (remembering to select the option to clone to a larger drive). Swap the drives. Job done and you still have a useable back up.

    http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.aspx

    http://www.farstone.com/software/drive-clone.php

    I prefer the Farstone V10 free for cloning from disc drives to SSDs. Its slower, but more reliable. Just click through the two bug reports when it starts. Hopefully V11 will solve that when the free version is released.

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    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calimanco View Post
    Why do we always over complicate things...I prefer the Farstone V10 free for cloning from disc drives to SSDs. Its slower, but more reliable. Just click through the two bug reports when it starts. Hopefully V11 will solve that when the free version is released.
    I am astounded!

    "...Just click through the two bug reports..."?

    Exactly why should I risk using software that you have explicitly admitted is "buggy"?

    I would much rather use software I have tried and proven to be reliable (and far more powerful than any so-called "free" solution) for about eight years now, thank you very much (see BootIt Bare Metal).
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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    WS Lounge VIP Calimanco's Avatar
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    Exactly why should I risk using software that you have explicitly admitted is "buggy"?

    Its a free version of a paid for program. The minor bugs don't affect its performance. Its as effective and reliable as any of the paid for programs and better than most. Free doesn't necessarily mean worse and you don't have to pay for upgrades either. Bootit has a few extra bells and whistles that most people will never need and which can be replicated with other free software if required, EasyBCD and EaseUS Partition Manager for instance.

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    Ya, the backup and restore method doesn't seem over-complicated but I've always found the better tool in this case to be cloning; unless of course no image existed in the first place!
    Cloning also requires some bridge dongle (USB-powered USB3 to SATA for instance) to make it ultra simple so if this is a once in a blue moon event, the slow road is a bit more economical; though with the possibility of a smaller SSD floating around without a good home, portable VMs on SSDs work great and justifies the bridge cable.

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    How long have you had the existing SSD? If over a year, I would install Windows from scratch on the new SSD - in a years time I really collect a lot of garbage and a fresh install gets rid of a lot of that. I would then place the old SSD in external USB enclosure and keep it around in case I need to copy anything over. I would also image the old SSD to a hard drive (I have several prior OS images on my hard drive).

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    Quote Originally Posted by F.U.N. downtown View Post
    Ya, the backup and restore method doesn't seem over-complicated but I've always found the better tool in this case to be cloning; unless of course no image existed in the first place!
    Cloning also requires some bridge dongle (USB-powered USB3 to SATA for instance) to make it ultra simple so if this is a once in a blue moon event, the slow road is a bit more economical; though with the possibility of a smaller SSD floating around without a good home, portable VMs on SSDs work great and justifies the bridge cable.
    Sorry, but certain things you say don't make sense, e.g.: "cloning also requires some bridge dongle". Since when?

    "Cloning" in context of hard disk drives (HHDs) means nothing more than copying the partitions (and maybe MBR data) from one HDD to another. If you are talking about "cloning" HDD partitions from a HDD to an SSD, then the same essentially holds true.

    What is this "bridge dongle"? Or were you using a particular program to "clone" which demanded this "bridge dongle"?
    Last edited by jwitalka; 2014-10-26 at 12:02. Reason: Removed derogatory comment
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    WS Lounge VIP Calimanco's Avatar
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    He means a SATA to USB adapter, which is required if both drives are not fitted internally and they are very inexpensive. It avoids having to put the drive into a caddy to connect it to the PC and is very useful if you have several spare hard drives, whether you are using them for imaging, cloning or just general storage.
    Incidentally, when cloning to an SSD, the software has to be able to correctly "align" the partition(s) for use by the SSD. This is important for getting the best performance out of the SSD.

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    Yes, the fact that imaging to an external backup drive was mentioned led me to assume there was not a spare internal drive already installed <my fault>.

    I use EaseUS ToDo Free by the way; just two days ago to clone a system partition to a SSD (obviously a "smart" clone, not a sector to sector clone) with the optimize for SSD checked. It hasn't let me down for all sorts of similar procedures except once, on a very old system.

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    New Lounger websquad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafed00d View Post
    How long have you had the existing SSD? If over a year, I would install Windows from scratch on the new SSD - in a years time I really collect a lot of garbage and a fresh install gets rid of a lot of that. I would then place the old SSD in external USB enclosure and keep it around in case I need to copy anything over. I would also image the old SSD to a hard drive (I have several prior OS images on my hard drive).
    I've indeed had the old SSD for over a year, but I use CCleaner to keep my system drive relatively clean.

    PS: The last time I used CCleaner was out of desperation: I had so much junk on my sys drive I couldn't even use MS Outlook. Yikes! So a session with CCleaner to get off old junk, RegEdit to make a backup copy, then CCleaner to clean the registry, and I recovered over 3GB of space.

    Thanks to all for your input!
    Last edited by websquad; 2014-10-27 at 16:39.

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    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Hey Y'all,

    FWIW I just did this process in reverse, i.e. moving from a 500GB HDD to a 120GB SSD on my wife's Dell XPS14z. Here's what I did:
    1. Used Macrium Reflect Pro to make an Image of the drive.
    2. Did the hardware thing swapping the drives.
    3. Booted to my Win 7 HP 64 bit installation disk to delete all the partitions on the SSD. This drive had previously been in my Win 8.1 Update1 desktop and was GPT!
    4. Booted into my Macrium Reflect Pro Windows PE boot disk.
    5. Restored the first 2 partitions (System Reserved & Dell Recovery) one by one - drag and drop. It also automatically changed the drive from GPT to MBR!
    6. Selected the C: System Partition, dragged it to the target drive then selected the Partition Properties link and used it to reduce the size of the partition by 20GB. Initiated the copy.
    7. Repeated the procedure for the G: Data Partition sizing it to use the remainder of the drive.
    8. Rebooted to Windows 7 HP 64 Bit ... didn't even need to be re-Activated!

    I've used Macrium to go up in disk size and down in disk size only ever having a problem once where I had to do a boot repair (because I got rid of the Dell Restore partition which is the boot partition on Dells) using this procedure.

    HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

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