Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    2,373
    Thanks
    235
    Thanked 147 Times in 136 Posts

    HHD Too many failures in reviews

    I have been looking for an internal HHD drive in the 2+GB range and I am not finding drives I feel confidence in. Too many failures in reviews. 5 star reviews are hard to find. Yes I know folk w/ bad experiences are more likely to write reviews than ones w/ good experience but I have always looked for 5 star reviews in a time frame of the last year
    or so. Some of the Seagates seem to be a possibility or maybe a mirror raid but I thought I would ask some pros here what they look for themselves.



    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    California & Arizona
    Posts
    6,121
    Thanks
    160
    Thanked 609 Times in 557 Posts
    Stop looking at non professional reviews wavy, they'll rot your brain.

    I've been using 2 and 3 TB drives for years now with minimal problems.
    Sure every now and then you get issues, but that goes for EVERYTHING ever made.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Manning, South Carolina
    Posts
    9,434
    Thanks
    372
    Thanked 1,457 Times in 1,326 Posts
    Wavy,

    +1 what CLiNT said. I've been using WD as my preferred brand w/nary a blip and I keep my machines for 5 years minimum and rarely switch drives unless it it to put a SSD in for the OS then I move the HDD over as a secondary drive for my Data and other uses. HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

    PowerShell & VBA Rule!

    My Systems: Desktop Specs
    Laptop Specs

  4. #4
    WS Lounge VIP Calimanco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    718
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 144 Times in 130 Posts

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Calimanco For This Useful Post:

    Mountain Aerie (2014-10-27)

  6. #5
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,396
    Thanks
    445
    Thanked 404 Times in 376 Posts
    I prefer Seagate or Maxtor internal drives, because if you have either, you can use the free Seagate DiscWizard backup software.

    http://www.seagate.com/support/downloads/

  7. #6
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    2,373
    Thanks
    235
    Thanked 147 Times in 136 Posts
    I think that you will find this enlightening.
    Thanks Calimanco, I actually had read those two articles.... and completely forgotten. I do remember not being absolutely certain they were really comparing apples to apples, but having reread the article I am a bit more comfortable w/ the general gist of it. Ironically IIRC, the only drive I ever had fail was a Hitachi except for that it has been WD black. I had a Seagate drive yeas ago and always had trouble with the Seagate software in windows. The failure rates seem high, 20 % dieing in 4 years does kinda say "It IS gonna happen to YOU"


    mrjphelps
    I had a Seagate drive yeas ago and always had trouble with the Seagate software in windows. The article CERTAINLY did not favor them for reliability. The reviews did look better but Clint does have a point. A 5 star review with lots of reviewers is an indicator when there just aren't any well ...
    All of which says Redundancy Rules! maybe its Raid time.

    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  8. #7
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    California & Arizona
    Posts
    6,121
    Thanks
    160
    Thanked 609 Times in 557 Posts
    The best you can do is:
    1. Choose a drive from a well known company that has a decent warranty
    and a good RMA process.
    2. Monitor the drives SMART values frequently.
    3. Fine tune your backup regimen, even if that means backing up your backups.
    4. RAID (backup type array) is not a bad idea too.

    I have backups, both image based and hardcopies, that are also mirrored to a 3rd drive, a 4th in some instances.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2014-10-28 at 17:44.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

  9. #8
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    2,373
    Thanks
    235
    Thanked 147 Times in 136 Posts

    updated data

    https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-...eptember-2014/

    data newish from Sept. reading now.

    One thing I will be looking for : how well can disk monitoring type programs predict failing drives.

    Note that HDDSentinal program is sounding better...
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  10. #9
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,154
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 306 Times in 266 Posts
    Re: the "BackBlaze" webpages linked from this thread.

    Can this company's experience of HDD failures in their data centre really be taken as relevant to HDDs in our PCs? They have many thousands of HDDs in their arrays, which is quite different to having one, two, or even a few more, in a PC.

    I have replaced hundreds of failed (or failing) HDDs in customers' computers over the years. About half of these have been 2.5inch Hitachi HDDs in laptops. Toshiba and Samsung 2.5inch HDDs seem next most prone to fail, while Seagate and WD laptop drives seem least likely to fail.

    Desktop (3.5inch) HDDs seem considerably less prone to failure. I rarely see a desktop with an Hitachi HDD, most of the desktops I have worked on have had Seagate or WD HDDs, and some Samsung drives. From what I have experienced it is fair to say that if a desktop HDD is going to fail it is most likely to do so within the first eighteen months (or so).

    I have a 2TB Seagate in my "Internet/production" PC, a 1.5TB Seagate in a "workbench" PC, and a 1.5GB WD in a 2nd "workbench" PC. Both 1.5TB HDDs are about 4 years old now without any problems so far. I also have four 3.5inch USB enclosures with 2TB Seagate HDDs. One is for storing backup images, another two are for backing up userdata from customers' HDDs, and the other is for general storage.

    The only significant problems I have had with any of my HDDs has been a 40GB WD that failed suddenly (total failure) about 2001, and the 2TB Seagate in my "Internet/production" PC. I fitted this 2TB Seagate about two years ago; about six weeks later I noticed a large number (240+) of "a controller error has been detected on HD1" (event 11) errors in the "Event Logs/System" log. I downloaded and applied a firmware upgrade from Seagate, the errors went away, and I have had no problem with that HDD since.

    When I checked out my other HDDs I found that one of the 2TB Seagates in a USB enclosure also needed a firmware upgrade.
    Last edited by Coochin; 2014-10-29 at 01:58.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
    AMD FX8120 (8-core @ 3.1GHz) CPU, Gigabyte GA-990FXA-D3 motherboard, 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1866MHz RAM, ATI-AMD Radeon HD6770 PCI-E VGA, 480GB Kingston SSD, 2TB Seagate SATA3.0 HDD, ASUS DVD/RW.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •