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  1. #1
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    How can I get Norton Internet Security Suite to allow ADWCleaner?

    I serviced a Vista Home Premium SP2 desktop computer today. There wasn't anything wrong with he computer but the couple asked me to do a tune-up on it and it was just a standard maintenance upkeep. I attempted to use adwcleaner but Norton Internet Security Suite blocks ADWCleaner from downloading and reports it is not safe and has been removed. I checked Norton Internet Security Suite firewall but cannot figure out how to allow ADWCleaner

    How can I get Norton Internet Security Suite to allow ADWCleaner?

  2. #2
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    Adwcleaner is a portable program, and doesn't need to be installed. Just Disable Antivirus Auto-Protect while downloading. I use both all the time. You can probably Exclude it as well, if you leave the Auto-Protect on, attempt to download the program, then review the antivirus actions in the Norton control panel.

    Zig

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  4. #3
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    Yep. What Zig said.

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    cmptrgy (2014-10-30)

  6. #4
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    I had that problem with Norton 360 and as AVAST Free was reported as doing the same at the time, I assumed the bleepingcomputer.com site had been hijacked until I found I was able to download it okay on another laptop with Norton 360.

    My workaround was to revert the computer to an earlier time and a manual check for updates to bring Norton back up to date as invariably, it's a buggy Definitions update that causes any problems.

    This may also work for you - else do a Norton Remove & Reinstall and then reload the full Definitions database.

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    cmptrgy (2014-10-30)

  8. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmptrgy View Post
    I serviced a Vista Home Premium SP2 desktop computer today. There wasn't anything wrong with he computer but the couple asked me to do a tune-up on it and it was just a standard maintenance upkeep. I attempted to use adwcleaner but Norton Internet Security Suite blocks ADWCleaner from downloading and reports it is not safe and has been removed. I checked Norton Internet Security Suite firewall but cannot figure out how to allow ADWCleaner

    How can I get Norton Internet Security Suite to allow ADWCleaner?
    Here is a thought from an IT Pro-Consultant who does not care for Norton, @ all. Remove Norton, problem(s) gone. Use MSE, Malwarebytes & CCleaner. You will have a happy computer, happy customer & happy life.

    Cheers,
    Drew

  9. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew1903 View Post

    Here is a thought from an IT Pro-Consultant who does not care for Norton, @ all. Remove Norton, problem(s) gone. Use MSE, Malwarebytes & CCleaner. You will have a happy computer, happy customer & happy life.

    Cheers,
    Drew
    Just relying on MSE, you could find yourself having to use MBAM a lot more often - even MS don't rate it.

    It's very rare that you'll see a Norton user asking for help with an infection - which is what counts.

  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo15 View Post
    Just relying on MSE, you could find yourself having to use MBAM a lot more often - even MS don't rate it.

    It's very rare that you'll see a Norton user asking for help with an infection - which is what counts.
    When I used MSE and ran MBAM occasionally (not often) it never found anything.

    Depends what kind of infection or malware. Some will blow right by it. But, there are many other negatives to or w/ Norton & McAfee that don't exist w/ MSE & WD & they have a lot of good points that don't apply to those other things. I have seen way to much trouble from or problems caused by Norton & McAfee. And many times when things in customers machines have been improved by replacing those things w/ something else. There's good reason many IT Pros don't recommend them. Anyway, each to their own. People will, still, keep spending money on those things be it necessary or not. OEMs offer them, people don't know any better take them & then end up paying to renew. Oh well, 2 bad, so sad.

    Cheers,
    Drew

  11. #8
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    I agree, I have yet to come across where MSE has caused any problems and have advised uninstalling a paid for AV and install MSE for trouble shooting purposes, where running in Safe Mode with Networking wasn't practical for troubleshooting a problem.

    As you say each to their own but both Avast Free and AVG are not without their own problems and I wouldn't give McAfee house room.

    I think IT Pros still relate to the past drag down in performance of Norton 360 but I uninstalled Norton and installed MSE with no noticeable improvement in performance.

    I'm quite happy with my Norton 360 as it has kept me safe for the last 4 years or so and in about a couple of weeks time, will be renewing my 5th subscription.

  12. #9
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    We all have a habit of not recommending software that we have experienced problems with in the past. But things do change over time. The AV that was rated the best last year may be close to the worst this year. I have had issues with Norton in the past but everything I've read this year rate it as one of the best. It comes free with some ISPs including mine (Comcast) and I no longer hesitate to recommend it to anyone that has access to it for free. I still think the freeware AVs are good enough for most people if you can stand the advertising that comes with many of them. Most of the paid AVs are a level better than the free ones though. Whether it makes a difference is largely a function of the browsing habits of the user. As Drew said, Microsoft Defender and Microsoft Security Essentials are the least intrusive free AV apps but they are currently rated significantly below most other AV apps. Next year - who knows.

    Jerry

  13. #10
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    I frankly sometimes don't know how much stock to put in the ratings that come from various sources. What I can say is OneCare, MSE & WD have served both myself & my clients w/out any negatives over a period of many years. No ads, no pesky pop-ups & no money, no renewing, no fuss, no muss. And it is handed to people as an integral part of their OS... couldn't be more convenient.

    No I'm not saying must be used, only that it seems like a no-brainer. And, yes, absolutely, safe surfing plays a major role! Any IT Pro knows, it is an inarguable truism that the biggest threat to internet security is about 30 to 45 cms in front of the screen.

    Cheers,
    Drew
    Last edited by Drew1903; 2014-11-03 at 21:12.

  14. #11
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    The How To Geek says it better than me.
    From http://www.howtogeek.com/173291/good...rty-antivirus/

    In an interview with Dennis Protection Labs, Holly Stewart, the senior program manager of the Microsoft Malware Protection Center, said that Microsoft Security Essentials was just a “baseline” that’s designed to “always be on the bottom” of antivirus tests. She said Microsoft sees MSE as a first layer of protection and advises Windows users to use a third-party antivirus instead.

    According to Holly Stewart, Microsoft “had an epiphany a few years ago, back in 2011, where we realised we had a greater calling and that was to protect all Microsoft customers.” She says that Microsoft passes its information on to other antivirus makers and helps them make their products better. “We used to have part of our time directed towards predicting test results,” but these people have now been directed to focus on emerging threats and share that information with other antivirus companies.

    She went on: “We’re providing all of that data and information to our partners so they can do at least as well as we are. The natural progression is that we will always be on the bottom of these tests. And honestly, if we are doing our job correctly, that’s what will happen.”

    Nevertheless, she argues that “baseline does not equal bad” and says they provide a high-quality antivirus. But Microsoft themselves are recommending users not use MSE, so it’s hard to take that seriously. This isn’t a product average people should use — it’s better than no antivirus, but not something we should recommend. Microsoft is doing a disservice to its users by telling antivirus testing companies that they don’t recommend MSE for average users and telling average users that MSE provides them with “comprehensive malware protection” on their website. Microsoft needs to pick one message and stick to it.
    If You’re a Geek, You Can Get By With MSE

    Now, if you’re a geek like we are, MSE and Windows Defender are very usable. If you have good security practices and know what you’re doing, you can manage just fine with this lightweight option. But average Windows users don’t always follow proper security practices and should use a strong antivirus that does well in tests — as Microsoft themselves now recommend.

    If you’re a geek, you probably shouldn’t recommend MSE to your friends or install it on your parents’ computer. Yes, it’s a shame — MSE’s lightweight and hassle-free nature make for a great interface and a faster computer. But the core of an antivirus is the detection engine, and Microsoft appears to be throwing in the towel here.
    Jerry

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