Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16
  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,070
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 132 Times in 86 Posts

    Ending UAC headaches, once and for all




    TOP STORY

    Ending UAC headaches, once and for all


    By Fred Langa

    Windows' User Account Control (UAC) helps keep us safe from unwanted system changes but it can also get in the way of routine operations. With the right tools and techniques, you can fine-tune UAC so that commonly used programs don't trigger UAC prompts.

    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/top-story/ending-uac-headaches-once-and-for-all (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Stockholm
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Ever since MS introduced UAC I have routinely switched it off. Just a bloody nuisance. Proper firewall and antivirus keeps me and my co-workers safe. And, of course, some common sense as to where we surf.

    /Thomas

  3. #3
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    yes, the uac is a royal pain. i use two small programs and really like both. the first is win patrol plus and the newest one is voodoo shield. with the last, there is a few minute training period and then it stops you from running anything unless you ok it and it learns. both have worked perfectly and i rarely get any notification or prompt.

  4. #4
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    2,335
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 267 Times in 260 Posts
    Three strikes for UAC; the day I take the time to accommodate UAC by doing everything mentioned in the article; well, I'll just get a Chromebook instead!

  5. #5
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    25
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by tgabriel View Post
    Ever since MS introduced UAC I have routinely switched it off. Just a bloody nuisance. Proper firewall and antivirus keeps me and my co-workers safe. And, of course, some common sense as to where we surf.

    /Thomas
    Absolutely right!

    I've gone one step further: stayed with XP. Yay!

  6. #6
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    My experience. UAC is for protecting dummies from hurting themselves. I have had UAC turned completely off since Windows XP and on my current Windows 7 x64. I have not had ANY ill effects whatsoever and I use my computer every day. Simply put I know what I'm doing on my computer, no one touches my computer but me on penalty of dealth, and I have both antivirus, Malwarebytes, and Spywareblaster installed. I'm know what I'm downloading and I'm good to go. My computer stays robust and safe just by me paying attention to it and doing the right things (UAC not being one of them). Nuff said. UAC can go straight to .....................
    I7 3770K @ 4.4 GHz (Noctua NH-U14S Heatsink), ASRock Z77 Extreme6, 16 Gigs Corsair DDR3 1600, EVGA GTX 770, Acer P236H 23" (1920x1080), Soundbaster Z, , WD 2 TB Black HDD, WD 1 TB Black HDD, WD 2 TB Black HDD (eSata), 2 DVD Burners, Logitech Z-5500 5.1 Speaker System, Rosewill Photon 750w PSU, HSPC Top Deck Tech Station, Windows 10 Pro x64

  7. #7
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ithaca, New York, USA
    Posts
    65
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 11 Times in 8 Posts
    NOTE: I have now decided that, even though what I've done below works for protecting you while on the Internet, the free (for non-commercial use) software called VoodooShield [http://voodooshield.com/] suggested by Clas above is a MUCH better and easier way to do the same thing, and more. Clearly it is effectively a completely usable replacement for the UAC.

    I also run with UAC turned off in Windows 7. I figured that the times I need UAC most is when I'm on the Internet. Therefore, I launch my browsers with a simple BAT file that turns on UAC before it launches the browser and turns off UAC after closing the browser. I do that by creating a bat file, for example, called Firefox_UAC.bat that looks like this (please change for your own folder that you will be using):

    :
    : Set User Account Control to default before running Firefox
    : and set it back to off after running Firefox.
    :
    @echo off
    CD "C:\Users\Stu\Documents\Bat"
    Start regedit.exe /s UAC_Level-2_Default.reg
    CD "C:\Program Files (x86)\Mozilla Firefox"
    Start "" /Wait firefox.exe %1
    CD "C:\Users\Stu\Documents\Bat"
    Start regedit.exe /s UAC_Level-4_Disable.reg
    Exit

    Where UAC_Level-2_Default.reg is this file:
    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\Curr entVersion\Policies\System]
    "ConsentPromptBehaviorAdmin"=dword:00000005
    "EnableLUA"=dword:00000001
    "PromptOnSecureDesktop"=dword:00000001

    and UAC_Level-4_Disable.reg is this file:
    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\Curr entVersion\Policies\System]
    "ConsentPromptBehaviorAdmin"=dword:00000000
    "EnableLUA"=dword:00000000
    "PromptOnSecureDesktop"=dword:00000000

    One more step: I convert the Firefox_UAC.bat file to a program called Firefox_UAC.exe by using a free program called "Bat to Exe Converter" [http://www.battoexeconverter.com/]. I do that to make it run faster and also so that I can do this final step: To make sure that all URL links launch the BAT file (now converted to an ".exe" file), I go to "Start - Control Panel - Default Programs - Set Associations" and change the association for ".url" to launch with program "Firefox_UAC.exe" instead of "Firefox.exe".

    Now, I use Firefox_UAC.exe to launch my browser and any URL links will also use it. It may sound complicated, but you just do it once and you're protected while on the Internet forever.
    Stu
    Last edited by sb06794; 2014-11-15 at 16:36.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to sb06794 For This Useful Post:

    RolandJS (2014-11-25)

  9. #8
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Courtenay, BC
    Posts
    244
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Khun Roger View Post
    I've gone one step further: stayed with XP. Yay!
    Sorry, but that's not a step further. In fact its now a dinosaur and makes you progressively more likely to be an infection vector.

    UAC has been almost invisible on my Win7 system, aside from a few legacy programs and the occasional time when it has been very useful. Like when something tried to install unwanted "extras".

    The article is simply a few ways to get rid of the last few places where UAC may be popping up unnecessarily. Like with legacy software.
    Last edited by DavidFB; 2014-11-13 at 18:50.

  10. #9
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    24
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I rejoiced at being able to clear off my cluttered desktop by pinning programs to the taskbar - but every tip in this piece tells me to create a desktop icon! Is the heavyweight Application Toolkit - which you don't explain how to use other than posting links to instructions elsewhere - the only way to start a program from the taskbar without the UAC permission popup?

  11. #10
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,483
    Thanks
    176
    Thanked 152 Times in 129 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Philnick View Post
    I rejoiced at being able to clear off my cluttered desktop by pinning programs to the taskbar - but every tip in this piece tells me to create a desktop icon! Is the heavyweight Application Toolkit - which you don't explain how to use other than posting links to instructions elsewhere - the only way to start a program from the taskbar without the UAC permission popup?
    If you create desktop shortcuts with alterations or parameters to bypass UACs, these Shortcuts can be placed (moved) anywhere from which a shortcut might be launched. Then they are off the desktop. The new locations can then be pinned to the Taskbar. This will retain all the parameters of the shortcuts, uncluding no UAC prompt where specified. No special tools required for Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bits, Admin or Standard user types. (Unless the original shortcuts don't play nice, in which case the more advanced methods may be needed, as described in the article.)

    I used this technique to create restricted Chrome Taskbar Launchers with the POODLE protections appended to the Launch Commands in the original shortcuts. The original shortcuts are placed off my desktop. Be sure to unpin any unrestricted Taskbar Shortcuts to the same programs (or label them distinctly) before using this technique.
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2014-11-15 at 13:22.
    -- Bob Primak --

  12. #11
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    24
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I downloaded the ITknowledge24 program. It works fairly well. Discovered after a while that instead of starting their shortcut, right-clicking on it on the taskbar and choose pin, I could simply drag the desktop shortcut down there.

    On a 64-bit machine, you only need to install the 64-bit version: it works to start your 32-bit programs as well.

    You bring up the shortcut creator, give the new shortcut a name, and copy over the path to start the program from inside the stock shortcut.

    One inconvenience - very minor - is that its newly created shortcuts don't always automatically use the application's icon, which is easily overcome by right-clicking and opening the new shortcuts' properties, and clicking Change Icon, which usually comes up with the app's icon already displayed and selected.

    I discovered in the process of creating a bunch of these shortcuts that some programmers get cute and don't show the path to their program in their shortcuts, which means you have to go spelunking to find them.

    The main inconvenience with this solution is that you have to right-click the service this program installs in your notification area whenever you start your machine and choose "Start service" - and deal with the UAC nag prompt - it can't do that for itself because it's not running yet! (And its own shortcut-generator also invokes the prompt when first started from inside its tray icon, which is a little harder to understand.)
    Last edited by Philnick; 2014-11-15 at 17:34.

  13. #12
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    10
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Well said.

  14. #13
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    24
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    After dealing with the popup during a restart asking me to authorize the ITknowledge24 UAC service, agreeing to which never worked smoothly because it came during a lengthy startup routine, I decided to try the MS Task Scheduler approach also outlined in the article.

    It's a bother to have to create not one but two items for each program you want to exempt from UAC - both a task and a shortcut to call the task - but there's no "authorization" step during bootup and no third-party program needed.

    By the way, when it comes time to create the shortcuts, the path to the Tasks folder is via System32 even on a 64-bit system.

    Giving a shortcut the right icon requires copying into the "Choose icon" routine the same path and program file as into the task the shortcut calls, but that's not hard, just repetitive.

    Now that it's all set up, the only annoyance is that some - and I don't know why it only affects some of them - of the programs started this way are preceded by a brief flicker, rapidly folded away, of a terminal (or DOS prompt) style window starting the task.

  15. #14
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Manning, South Carolina
    Posts
    9,436
    Thanks
    372
    Thanked 1,457 Times in 1,326 Posts
    Philnick & All,

    I agree with Phil that this is a cumbersome task as I've been doing it for quite a while I know what a pain it can be. So I said to myself, "self why don't you automate it?" So I did. You 'll find the PowerShell script I wrote, if you're interested, in the Windows Programming forum. I'm not posting it here as I want to make sure those who frequent the WP forum see it and can make comments to help this newbie to PowerShell write better code. I've also written a small user manual and will post it as a pdf in the same post. Please leave all comments on the program in the WP forum. Thanks.

    Update: Here's a link to the thread with the files.
    Last edited by RetiredGeek; 2014-11-24 at 22:51.
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

    PowerShell & VBA Rule!

    My Systems: Desktop Specs
    Laptop Specs

  16. #15
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    24
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    One trap I found with the Task Scheduler approach is that the default settings on the Conditions tab on a new task tell the task not to run if the machine is running on batteries and not to run unless the machine is idle - and stop when it's not!

    While these may be reasonable settings for tasks being started on a schedule, they can be disastrous for a task being run hands on. I think the "stop when not idle" rule may have caused a bulk copy operation to stop on me today.

    I've gone into the Conditions tabs of all of my NoUAC tasks and turned off those rules!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •