Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 79
  1. #1
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    White Plains, NY, USA
    Posts
    45
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Moving To New CPU, Need To Keep Old Windows Install

    I am a techie, supporting several hundred Win7 PCs.

    Have a couple of questions regarding my personal Dell Studio PC. It crashed fatally a few months back. For various reasons, I am just replacing it now with another Dell model.

    My original hard drives are OK, the old PC blew a motherboard and it made more sense to get a new CPU. This new CPU has a large SSD hard drive and a 2nd conventional drive.

    I had no warning about the crash, so I have no idea what all my apps are, let alone where the CDs/DVDs and installation files are. I would like to first start out with my old hard drive in there, get the PC up and running, then transfer the C drive to the solid-state drive via Acronis.

    I am going to take the video card and sound card from my old PC to my new PC. That should ease many driver issues. I will have access to the Internet from another PC and I also will have a DVD that comes with the new PC.

    I wanted to run this past the great people in this forum. I know it will be a lot of work, that is part of the deal.

    Will I have any issues with Windows 7 rejecting the new CPU with the old hard drive. Will Win7 reject the new hard drive after I clone the drive and migrate it to the solid state drive? I also have Windows 360 which can be a pain. Should I expect any license problems there.

    Anything else I should do? Luckily I am backed up twice, moving data files is not an issue.

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,407
    Thanks
    447
    Thanked 405 Times in 377 Posts
    Seems to me that you should be able to do this. What will happen is, after installing your hard drive into the new computer, you will have to update most or all of the drivers in Windows -- ethernet, chipset, audio, etc.

    The easiest way to do it is to install an ethernet card which you have the driver for, so that you can quickly get on the internet. You can then easily surf the web for all of the drivers that you need.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to mrjimphelps For This Useful Post:

    wexmary (2014-11-13)

  4. #3
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    White Plains, NY, USA
    Posts
    45
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Both my old PC and my new PC have built-in Ethernet. I have two bays so after I boot up with the old drive (C) I can find drivers and any files in the new hard drive (D). I will go into the BIOS and have it automatically start from the old hard drive.

    Thank you for the encouragement!!!!

  5. #4
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Austin metro area TX USA
    Posts
    1,733
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 128 Times in 125 Posts
    Your Windows will probably require a ReActivation. That should go smoothly.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  6. #5
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California, USA
    Posts
    735
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 80 Times in 78 Posts
    Your Windows will probably require a ReActivation.
    Not necessarily, if the prior cofiguration was more than 6 months old.

    Zig

  7. #6
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,154
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 307 Times in 267 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by wexmary View Post
    ...Will I have any issues with Windows 7 rejecting the new CPU with the old hard drive...
    I have several times fitted new motherboards (which often were from different manufacturers, and had different chipsets and other components) to customers' computers after their original motherboard failed (usually after a mains power "spike"). Usually Windows will boot, but will discard any incompatible drivers.

    Edit 22 November 2014: Rather than "I have several times fitted new motherboards..." I should have written "I have many times fitted new motherboards..." (I haven't kept count, but it would be at least 100 times).

    However, it would be safest if you disconnected the SSD and any other HDD before trying to get Windows to run on the new Dell. Once you have your Windows running you can then re-connect any other drives.

    Quote Originally Posted by wexmary View Post
    ...I also have Windows 360 which can be a pain...
    By "Windows 360" I think you must mean "Norton 360"? If so, and provided Windows sorts itself out and runs on the new Dell, then you should uninstall Norton 360 before trying to install the new chipset drivers and other needed drivers.

    Quote Originally Posted by wexmary View Post
    ...Should I expect any license problems there...
    In most cases when I have replaced motherboards Windows has required re-activation. The activation process can easily be upset by security programs like Norton 360.

    Quote Originally Posted by wexmary View Post
    ...Anything else I should do?...
    Once you have your old Windows working with the new Dell, look up the new Dell's model number (or "Service Tag") on Dell's support site and download the necessary drivers onto a USB drive so you can transfer/install them in your old Windows.
    Last edited by Coochin; 2014-11-21 at 21:38. Reason: correction
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
    AMD FX8120 (8-core @ 3.1GHz) CPU, Gigabyte GA-990FXA-D3 motherboard, 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1866MHz RAM, ATI-AMD Radeon HD6770 PCI-E VGA, 480GB Kingston SSD, 2TB Seagate SATA3.0 HDD, ASUS DVD/RW.

  8. #7
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,191
    Thanks
    48
    Thanked 985 Times in 915 Posts
    Take an image of the old hard drive before doing anything. You should be able to restore this image to new hardware using the backup program you used for the image, although this usually requires the paid version of the backup program.

    Alternatively you can probably convert the old disk to a virtual image and fire it up in a VM, then work from there.

    cheers, Paul

  9. #8
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    White Plains, NY, USA
    Posts
    45
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thank you everyone. I have used your great advice to write some notes. Installation will occur in 2-3 weeks (fingers crossed).

  10. #9
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    23,592
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 1,059 Times in 928 Posts
    I'm reading this as you saying you have a new PC and are moving the disk drives from your old PC to the new PC. If Windows 7 on the old PC is an OEM version it is tied to the old PC and can't be used on the new PC. BTW, generally a new motherboard = new PC.

    Joe

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to JoeP517 For This Useful Post:

    grichardt01 (2015-01-08)

  12. #10
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,154
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 307 Times in 267 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeP517 View Post
    ...If Windows 7 on the old PC is an OEM version it is tied to the old PC and can't be used on the new PC....
    Whether Win7 is OEM or retail/upgrade makes no difference. Whenever I have fitted new motherboards to customers PCs Windows (whether XP, Vista, or Win7) has re-activated successfully.

    So far I haven't had to fit a new motherboard to a Win8 PC, but do not expect activation to be a problem provided the Windows licence key is known.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
    AMD FX8120 (8-core @ 3.1GHz) CPU, Gigabyte GA-990FXA-D3 motherboard, 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1866MHz RAM, ATI-AMD Radeon HD6770 PCI-E VGA, 480GB Kingston SSD, 2TB Seagate SATA3.0 HDD, ASUS DVD/RW.

  13. #11
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Durham UK
    Posts
    6,631
    Thanks
    147
    Thanked 882 Times in 844 Posts
    Booting up with the old Win 7 HDD in a Win 8 machine will probably result in a BSOD because that install is registered to the older machine's hardware and won't be transferable as Joe has said.

    It's one thing putting a new mobo into an existing Win 7 machine which will still need reactivation and you could persuade MS that is all you are doing - but you may have to purchase a new product key for the Win 7.
    Last edited by Sudo15; 2014-11-21 at 06:59.

  14. #12
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    23,592
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 1,059 Times in 928 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Whether Win7 is OEM or retail/upgrade makes no difference. Whenever I have fitted new motherboards to customers PCs Windows (whether XP, Vista, or Win7) has re-activated successfully.

    So far I haven't had to fit a new motherboard to a Win8 PC, but do not expect activation to be a problem provided the Windows licence key is known.
    I should've said a different model motherboard = new PC in Microsoft terms. If you are using the same model motherboard you can sometimes get away with saying it is a repair and get Windows activated. A new PC means that if you had an OEM version of Windows from one of the big OEMs it is not transferable to a new PC. I'd be surprised if you can activate an OEM version of Windows on a new PC especially when Windows is tied to the BIOS.

    Joe

  15. #13
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Durham UK
    Posts
    6,631
    Thanks
    147
    Thanked 882 Times in 844 Posts
    I think the whole idea is a non-starter as Win 7 would need to be booted to be reactivated and that's not going to happen when it's plugged into a Win 8 machine.

    Even a Repair Install is done from within Windows, although it may work by booting up with a Win 7 install disk and going the Install/Upgrade route ?

  16. #14
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,154
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 307 Times in 267 Posts
    I have edited my #6 post above to more accurately reflect my experience with replacing motherboards and subsequently re-activating Windows.

    Edit 22 November 2014: Rather than "I have several times fitted new motherboards..." I should have written "I have many times fitted new motherboards..." (I haven't kept count, but it would be at least 100 times).
    In none of these cases (since 2002 after XP was released) did re-activation of Windows (XP, Vista, or Win7) fail (more on this below).

    Re Sudo15's #11 and $13 posts:
    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo15 View Post
    Booting up with the old Win 7 HDD in a Win 8 machine will probably result in a BSOD because that install is registered to the older machine's hardware and won't be transferable as Joe has said. It's one thing putting a new mobo into an existing Win 7 machine which will still need reactivation and you could persuade MS that is all you are doing - but you may have to purchase a new product key for the Win 7.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo15 View Post
    I think the whole idea is a non-starter as Win 7 would need to be booted to be reactivated and that's not going to happen when it's plugged into a Win 8 machine. Even a Repair Install is done from within Windows, although it may work by booting up with a Win 7 install disk and going the Install/Upgrade route ?
    And JoeP517's #12 post:
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeP517 View Post
    I should've said a different model motherboard = new PC in Microsoft terms. If you are using the same model motherboard you can sometimes get away with saying it is a repair and get Windows activated. A new PC means that if you had an OEM version of Windows from one of the big OEMs it is not transferable to a new PC. I'd be surprised if you can activate an OEM version of Windows on a new PC especially when Windows is tied to the BIOS. Joe
    Microsoft's EULA for Windows does not and cannot prevent fitting replacement parts, or moving a Windows installation to a different PC provided that Windows installation is used on only one PC.

    In all cases when I have had to re-activate Windows after a hardware change automatic activation has failed with a message (from memory) "Due to a recent change to this computer's hardware Windows must be re-activated...". This requires activating by phone to one of the numbers listed in the message, entering a 48-digit code by pressing keys on the phone's keypad, then entering a 48-digit "confirmation code" into the activation dialog.

    Also, Microsoft's requirement for OEMs to hide the Win8 licence key by coding it into the UEFI applies to laptops and touchpads, not desktop PCs.

    Since Win8 was released I have supplied several new laptops to customers, which came with both Win8 and Win7 "recovery" disks. This alone shows that Windows activation will not prevent running Win7 (or earlier) on a computer that originally had Win8.

    There is at least one other thread in this forum in which a poster relates how his Win8 computer was downgraded to Win7, although he had a computer shop do the downgrade.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
    AMD FX8120 (8-core @ 3.1GHz) CPU, Gigabyte GA-990FXA-D3 motherboard, 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1866MHz RAM, ATI-AMD Radeon HD6770 PCI-E VGA, 480GB Kingston SSD, 2TB Seagate SATA3.0 HDD, ASUS DVD/RW.

  17. #15
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Durham UK
    Posts
    6,631
    Thanks
    147
    Thanked 882 Times in 844 Posts
    I take your point about changing MBs and even downgrading a Win 8 machine to Win 7 but the OP is attempting to install a HDD from another machine with what is probably an OEM install.

    How do you suggest this Win 7 HDD can be booted up in a Win 8 machine so that it can be reactivated - it would have to be a clean install.

Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •