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  1. #1
    2 Star Lounger
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    Partition Removal?

    I'm not sure if the G drive below is a partition or not. I don't do partitions.

    This problem is a result of my failed installation of DeepFreeze, which is
    a system restore program. I made a post here:
    http://windowssecrets.com/forums/sho...d-of-this-Help
    This program partially installed but then failed. I couldn't get rid of it but
    thanks to a few members here I was able to remove it with IOBit unlocker. It is
    now removed with one exception. It has left a small (0.99GB) Thawed space on the
    harddrive labeled G drive.

    Attachment 40565

    I want to delete this. I orginally thought it would show in Disk Management but
    there isn't anything there.
    ScreenShot002.jpg

    How do I remove this ThawedSpace(G) from Start/Computer? If I run RevoUninstallerPro
    will that do it or should I just leave it alone?

    Thanks in advanced.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    4 Star Lounger
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    Since Disk Management can't see the "G" partition, you need to use something else like gparted to either delete it, or get it into such a condition that Disk Management can see it.

  3. #3
    3 Star Lounger
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    The Disk Management screenshot shows Disk 0 is 596.17GB in size. The 3 partitions shown all add up to 596.17GB, so there is no missing or unallocated space in the user accessible area of the disk. 596.17 binary GB is 640 decimal GB (596.17*1024^3), so if the disk drive in question is labeled as a 640 GB drive then the user accessible area and physical disk space are one and the same--and thus there is also no "Host Protected Area" in which a partition could hide from Windows Disk Manager.

    If that's the case, there is no actual partition that needs to be removed, so you can ignore any recommendations to try this or that partition management utility.

    If you're still seeing some indication you have a G partition, that leaves only three possible scenarios:

    1. Windows is loading a device driver designed to make it appear there is a virtual partition; or
    2. the MBR boot code has been altered to load, before Windows even begins to load, a device driver for a virtual partition; or
    3. the disk drive's partition table contains an entry pointing to a fictitious, virtual partition.

    In all three scenarios, "virtual" means there is no actual partition, it's a fictitious area of sectors that a software driver has been made to read/write to as though it were a real partition.

    I'm not familiar with DeepFreeze so have no idea which method it may employ to make it appear there is a G partition. In the other thread it sounded like Rick Corbett might be familiar with the program, so perhaps he has some idea. The link Rick pointed to, though, doesn't clarify which method the program may be using.

    In the other thread you indicated you were going to wipe and reinstall Windows. Did you do that? If so, then you can rule out scenario 1. If not, then scenario 1 is still a possibility, so I would follow through with your plan to do a clean install.

    If you've done a clean install and still see a drive G, then consider scenario 2.

    If scenario 2 the typical Win7 MBR boot code would have been replaced with proprietary boot code that first loads the DeepFreeze driver, then lets Windows begin booting. The device driver and sometimes even the sectors comprising the virtual "partition" (if small enough) may be written to the normally unused sectors behind the MBR on the first track of the hard disk. Note that replacing the MBR code is how rootkits operate, so if this method is being employed that would explain the rootkit warning you mentioned in the other thread.

    Methods to repair the MBR boot code will depend on whether or not the DeepFreeze code actually messed with the partition table. If not, repair may be as simple as booting to a command prompt in the Windows recovery console and issuing the command "bootrec /fixmbr".

    If you've done a clean install of Windows and made certain the MBR boot code is the standard Microsoft version but still see a drive G, then consider scenario 3.

    If scenario 3 the partition table would have been altered to add an extra entry for another partition, but the partition parameters would point to a group of sectors that may actually be a file in some other partition (such as the regular Windows partition). FTR, this is the technique used a decade ago by the old Norton Ghost program, which created a temporary virtual partition to "run" from while restoring Windows.

    Removing the virtual partition from a scenario-3 partition table involves merely overwriting the corresponding entry in the partition table with zeroes.

    As I said, I'm not familiar with DeepFreeze at all, but hopefully this may give you some direction for investigating.

  4. #4
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    I use Acronis Disk Director 12 for partition work, after using Windows Disk Management to confirm what I do not desire to change. If DD12 & WDM agree on the untouchables, then I attack the touchable via DD12.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  5. #5
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    Thanks everyone. Lot of good info here. I'll look into all of these suggestions and in the end if I'm not comfortable I'll just leave G alone.

    This thread is closed for me.

  6. #6
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    I'd leave that G drive alone. I doubt that it will cause you any performance issues in the future.

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