Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    22
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Reconfiguring Server 2008 in new location and getting Internet access

    I have a server running 2008R2, that is configured for a domain and several users. We relocated to a new office and I cannot get it connected to the internet.

    Previous installation had a network map of... Switch - Cable/DSL Router - DSL Modem. Which was a Frontier DSL modem.

    The new location has an existing TimeWarner cable modem and Cable/DSL router, and just one PC. I connected my switch to the router, then all of the new PC's and server to the switch.
    If I leave the server disconnected, the PC's will connect to the internet when they boot. If the server is connected and I log into the domain, I am unable to connect to the internet.

    The connection does not require a username/password.
    From the server... I have tried disabling the firewall, with no change. Also, I have tried to setup using the new connection wizard while leaving the name/pswd fields blank, and fail with an error of 651.

    I suspect that there are some IP addresses in the server configuration that need changed, but I don't have much experience with current server software versions.


    Thanks

  2. #2
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    22
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I figure I won't need the old router and modem, but I did try including them in the chain a couple of different ways, but was unable to improve my situation.

    Probably need reconfigure the DNS server on the server. I am not sure that I want to make my changes on the hardware that was already existing.
    Last edited by acrosteve; 2014-12-06 at 08:46.

  3. #3
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    22
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Well, I changed the adapter settings to get the ip addresses automatically and it seems to have fixed the issue.

    However, I wonder if I should have any particular concerns in resolving the problem in this way?

  4. #4
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,186
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 983 Times in 913 Posts
    If you changed the server adapter to auto-IP you will have problems. Leave it as hard coded.
    As you are running an AD you need the server to dole out IP addresses, not the router. Disable DHCP on the router and enable it on the server. Now you need to change the DNS settings on the server so requests to unknown domains (everything except the DC) is forwarded to your ISP's DNS servers, or the local router.

    The DNS lookup works like this. PC asks it's default DNS for an address, the default DNS is the AD server.
    If the DNS server does not support that domain it forwards the request to the DNS servers you have specified above, then returns the result to the PC.

    cheers, Paul

  5. #5
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    22
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks for the response. I figured as much, but I do not have the password for the router just yet. Something for me to work towards.

    There is a secondary problem that I can't help but think is related. We run Sage 50 on the server/workstations. I can ping the server from the workstations and get a very fast response. So, file access seems to not be the problem, but when we run the software, it is very slow to respond and present a login screen - over 2 minutes, I would say. Then, when we do login, many of the operations within the program are also slow.

  6. #6
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,186
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 983 Times in 913 Posts
    You are probably running Sage itself from the server. Loading executables from servers is often slow. Install Sage on each PC then access the data from a common location on the server.

    cheers, Paul

    p.s. The DNS change on the server is to set a forwarder.

  7. #7
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    22
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Well, I tried various things for several hours and the only thing that works is to have the router assign the ip addresses.

    I did set the server to a fixed address, but there is still an issue with the Sage software. Sage is installed on all of the workstations - just the data is on the server, but the startup is still extremely slow.

    I think I just have to get someone that is up to speed with the server configuration to get it set right. I don't really understand why Peachtree would be so slow, when the file access and ping speeds are so good.

  8. #8
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,186
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 983 Times in 913 Posts
    If the server is not dolling out IP addresses the PCs will not be happy AD hunters because the DNS will be wrong.

    Try copying some files between the server and PCs to check network speed.

    cheers, Paul

  9. #9
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Acrosteve,
    You have several bad things going on...
    1. You internet issues are directly related to a) DNS on the server (it's DNS settings in it's IP configuration on it's primary network interface) and b) IP addressing in general.
    2. Your server is most likely acting as a DHCP server for your PC clients so they can get IP addressing automatically sent and assigned to them when they boot up, so they don't have network problems.

    Now, if you changed the IP address settings on the server, your clients WILL have problems fully connecting, authenticating, and accessing resources on the server. A Microsoft Windows server running version 2000 or better MUST have it's time synced with an external time source that is an NTP server, and all clients on your network must sync with your server. Luckily, this happens automatically on the client side (and server side with Win2008R2 or better if it has access to the Internet). The main problem with changing server IP settings is: 1. If your server is running Active Directory, which I have to assume it is, the server should be running as a DNS Server. Also, DNS settings on the server should point to ITSELF primarily (1st DNS server in it's IP config should be itself so when it has to look up things in Active Directory, or figure out client IP addresses, it looks to it's own DNS Server database (read up on DNS Server in Windows Server 2008 R2). The secondary DNS server setting in the server's IP addressing config should point to an EXTERNAL DNS server like 208.67.220.220, which is OpenDNS.org's primary DNS Server and is useable for resolving Internet bound name queries (without this, your WILL NEVER get to anything on the Internet by name, e.g. www.yahoo.com, because the server nor the client can translate the name to IP address).
    2. If your server also has a DHCP Server installed on it, you need to ensure your DHCP Scope has scope option 16 enabled and configured so that your clients get your server as the primary DNS server. Again, without this, your clients will have MAJOR problems (as you're seeing with Sage) connecting to, authenticating with, and accessing resources on your server! Make sure your clients get your server as their primary DNS server and that the DNS Server service on your server has a FORWARD setup to 208.67.220.220 for all other domains (again, read up on DNS Server) so that if the client sends a request to the server for anything outside your Windows Active Directory domain name space, it will FORWARD that request to an external DNS server to resolve (e.g. a client opens a web browser, goes to yahoo.com, which your server's DNS is NOT responsible for, so it forwards the request to 208.67.220.220 which resolves it properly, and your server sends the proper response to your client).
    3. You could, rather than setup a forward in your server's DNS Server services, use your DSL modem/router's IP address as the DNS forward address, AS LONG AS IT is getting it's IP automatically from your ISP AND is getting an external DNS server from your ISP to use for resolving requests. Then you could set your server's DNS Server settings to forward any other DNS requests to the DSL modem/router, and it in turn will forward out to an Internet DNS server at your ISP. Again, your clients would use your server as the DNS server, it then in turn uses your ISPs DNS server and the originating DNS query gets answered and the Internet "works". Without proper name resolution, Internet access is pretty much void (unless you connect directly to an IP address, not a name like www.yahoo.com). You can test Internet access using NAMES or IP ADDRESSES. If names don't work, try an IP - like pinging 208.67.220.220 - and if that works, then DNS is your problem, as it seems to be.

    This is all Windows Server networking 101, and if you don't understand it, you will likely continue to have MANY problems on your internal network accessing resources on your server like file/print/network apps/authentication. I highly suggest you get someone who knows Windows Server networking to inspect your: 1. DNS Server configuration on your server. 2. Your Server's IP configuration to ensure it is using a STATICALLY assigned IP address, and proper DNS server settings (with itself as the primary and it is running DNS Server services, properly configured (CRITICAL for Active Directory, authentication, and access to server resources). 3. DHCP services on your server are properly configured so that client PCs get proper IP settings, including and most importantly an IP Address that no other machine is using on your internal network and the IP address of your server as their primary DNS server setting in their IP addressing settings.

    Best of luck, and happy holidays!

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to szigmund For This Useful Post:

    acrosteve (2014-12-18)

  11. #10
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    22
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Very good 1st post.
    We did get it working with the server functioning as the DHCP server also.

    The root of my initial difficulty was that when I tried to changed the fixed IP of the router, it locked up and would only respond when I reset it to it's defaults. I did not try doing it again at the time. I just I did get a local tech who is much more fluent than I and did get everything ironed out pretty much as you described.

  12. #11
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by acrosteve View Post
    Very good 1st post.
    We did get it working with the server functioning as the DHCP server also.

    The root of my initial difficulty was that when I tried to changed the fixed IP of the router, it locked up and would only respond when I reset it to it's defaults. I did not try doing it again at the time. I just I did get a local tech who is much more fluent than I and did get everything ironed out pretty much as you described.

    Thanks, and good to hear you got it straightened out. Windows networks without DNS and time is like coffee without water... be well. I do remote work, so if you're ever in need, look me up.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •