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  1. #1
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    After a successful SSD migration - what to do with files on the old drive?

    I appreciate the experience of others regarding SSD installation/migration, which I have just successfully completed on my Win7 Pro 64-bit system. However, I haven't seen any commentary on what folks do with the old hard drive (boot) files etc. which have just been migrated to the new C-drive on the SSD. This "migration" (using Paragon software) didn't delete any files from the old hard drive but renamed the partition.

    I'm planning on leaving My Music on the old drive and deleting it from the SSD to regain space (currently My Music on the SSD occupies 19GB). I suppose the old partition could serve as a backup; however, I already have a good system using Acronis on an external USB hard drive and so this isn't really needed. I'm curious what others have done with the old drive/partition/files after migration... Many thanks.
    Last edited by StephenB; 2014-12-13 at 09:10. Reason: clarification of "migration"

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    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Stephen,

    I'm assuming that this is a desktop since most laptops don't have room for a 2nd drive.

    What I would suggest is cleaning the old drive and then set up a partition for your data and then use the MS approved method to move your data file folders to the new partition here are two articles that tell you how.

    Article 1
    Article 2

    Once you do this your backup/image routine is simplified, IMHO, as you only need to worry about the Data Partition on a regular schedule. The System partition can be Imaged less frequently, like before Patch Tuesday and/or before making major changes to the OS and/or installed programs then again after you verify that the changes were successful. This type of routine should keep you out of major trouble. It also makes it easier to install new OSes like the upcoming Win 10.

    HTH
    Last edited by RetiredGeek; 2014-12-13 at 10:45.
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  3. #3
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    I use a multi-tiered approach to backup. I run my daily backup to an internal disk, then Robocopy that disk to an external disk. If my SSD dies I just recover from the internal disk, if my system goes bang I recover from the external disk.

    cheers, Paul

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetiredGeek View Post
    What I would suggest is cleaning the old drive and then set up a partition for your data and then use the MS approved method to move your data file folders to the new partition here are two articles that tell you how. <snip>
    Thanks to you and Paul for your suggestions. I wasn't aware of the Move command nor was I aware of using it with AppData. I'm using a slightly older email program, version 5 of Forte Agent, which seems not to like AppData anywhere but on C-drive. I need to do more research on that and/or update the program. My backups are incremental which works fine for me.

    Cheers, Stephen

  5. #5
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StephenB View Post
    I appreciate the experience of others regarding SSD installation/migration, which I have just successfully completed on my Win7 Pro 64-bit system. However, I haven't seen any commentary on what folks do with the old hard drive (boot) files etc. which have just been migrated to the new C-drive on the SSD. This "migration" (using Paragon software) didn't delete any files from the old hard drive but renamed the partition.

    I'm planning on leaving My Music on the old drive and deleting it from the SSD to regain space (currently My Music on the SSD occupies 19GB). I suppose the old partition could serve as a backup; however, I already have a good system using Acronis on an external USB hard drive and so this isn't really needed. I'm curious what others have done with the old drive/partition/files after migration... Many thanks.
    My preference would be to delete all partitions and format the old drive and just use it as storage. If the old drive is anything less than 1TB I would probably not consider it worth keeping even as an extra internal drive. My storage needs are much higher.
    19GB worth of music is representative of a small portion of the 300GB that I normally have, and that's just music.
    Considering my specific usage needs/desires, I'd use at as an externally connected drive used & connected only when needed, if it's less than 1TB. (backup of a backup)
    I don't want partitions on a secondary drive either, and I certainly don't want anything less than a full 1TB as a secondary drive.
    As far as I'm concerned partitions on a desktop system's secondary drives are completely redundant and useless.

    ***
    If you are migrating from a type of system that has a hidden full factory restoration partition, then that partition
    needed to have been migrated as well, unless the SSD drive is too small to comfortably accommodate it and everything else you want on it. (you should have chosen an SSD that can easily accommodate the hidden partition)
    It's far preferable, to me at least, to make that restoration partition bootable, and preferably to DVD disk.
    You could keep it on the old drive, but to me it's just a waste of the old drive's space, especially if the drive is less than 500GB.
    It's my preference to NEVER have to deal with some stupid OEM recovery partition in the first place, instead, invest
    in a fully functional genuine OS disk.
    OEM recovery partitions always complicate things for the worst, especially when modding.

    It's all going to come down to preference and very little else.
    In the end you decide what you want to do with it.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2015-02-01 at 18:24.
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