Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17
  1. #1
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Littleton, Colorado
    Posts
    492
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts

    Internet speed through router Ethernet connection

    I'm running Win 7 Pro SP1 on my computer. I run my internet cable (from Comcast) directly into my modem (which Comcast provides). From the modem, I connect to my router (an older Belkin N150 router) via an ethernet cable. I connect the router to my desktop computer via an ethernet cable from one of the 4 available ethernet ports on the router. So my desktop computer is basically hardwired to the modem via the router.

    I have an excellent internet connection (nominally, according to Comcast, the latest 100 Mbps speed that they offer). When I actually test my speed (using Speedtest.net), I'm consistently showing downlink speeds of around 68 Mbps and upload speeds of around 12.2 Mbps (not bad by any measure).

    As an experiment, I removed my router from the loop (i.e., I connected my modem directly to my computer via an ethernet cable), and my speeds increased significantly (at least my downlinklink speed did) to about 104 Mbps downlink and 12.3 uplink.

    Let me be clear: I'm not writing to complain about any of these speeds. But I'm curious. Why would putting the router in the loop (remember, I'm only talking about the hardwire connection, not wi-fi) cause such a large speed drop? Is this typical, or would it possibly improve with a newer router?

    Thanks for any info you can provide.

  2. #2
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,203
    Thanks
    49
    Thanked 989 Times in 919 Posts
    The router is only as fast as the internal processor / design allows. Cheaper routers are also cheaper in design and components, so seeing lower throughput is not surprising. I'd check out some reviews that did throughput tests.

    cheers, Paul

  3. #3
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    301
    Thanks
    65
    Thanked 39 Times in 30 Posts
    Router is like a tiny computer but is running only one program: routing. There will be overhead, maybe 10%-20%. On top of that, the internet side (WAN) speed is shared by all the local networks, be it wired or non-wired. These PCs share the total WAN speed. If only 1 local PC, it has all the WAN speed minus the router overhead.

  4. #4
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Posts
    42
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by LesF View Post
    Belkin N150 router
    I'm not familiar with that unit, so I just Googled it. From what I can see, it doesn't have Gigabit Ethernet ports. That strongly suggests that the unit is simply too slow to handle the full speed that is available to you from your ISP.

    Methinks that a faster router will help. Asus has some really decent units for not that much money.

    dwayne

  5. #5
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Littleton, Colorado
    Posts
    492
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Thank you all for your replies.
    As I mentioned, I'm not complaining about the speed I'm getting (even through the router), but I'm intrigued about what speeds might be possible with a more modern router. There's nothing I do on my desktop that would require anything faster, but perhaps my laptops or my wife's iPads could benefit from increased speed (my fairly new Sony Vaio shows a speed of around 12 Mbps when it's used across the house from where the router is located).
    I'll look into this. Thanks.

  6. #6
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,155
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 307 Times in 267 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by LesF View Post
    ...As an experiment, I removed my router from the loop (i.e., I connected my modem directly to my computer via an ethernet cable), and my speeds increased significantly (at least my downlinklink speed did) to about 104 Mbps downlink and 12.3 uplink...
    You could probably bypass the router for the Ethernet connection to your PC by adding a switch between the modem and the router.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
    AMD FX8120 (8-core @ 3.1GHz) CPU, Gigabyte GA-990FXA-D3 motherboard, 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1866MHz RAM, ATI-AMD Radeon HD6770 PCI-E VGA, 480GB Kingston SSD, 2TB Seagate SATA3.0 HDD, ASUS DVD/RW.

  7. #7
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Forever West
    Posts
    2,078
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 259 Times in 248 Posts
    adding a switch between the modem and the router
    I think the Switch goes between the Router and the computers. The Router has an Uplink port for connecting to the Modem, the Switch doesn't. At least that's the way my Network is set up with 2 printers and up to 6 Wired computers plus a few Wireless computers. As of now Internet download speeds [up to 30Mbps] in my area aren't as fast as the Network speed [100Mbps or 1000Mbps]. Like many things in computing the fastest system is slowed to the speed of the slowest part in the system, i.e. to get Gigabit speed the NIC and Router and/or Switch must be rated as the same, the Ethernet cable should be good quality CAT5 or newer CAT5e or CAT6.
    Last edited by Berton; 2015-01-10 at 10:30.

  8. #8
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,155
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 307 Times in 267 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Berton View Post
    I think the Switch goes between the Router and the computers. The Router has an Uplink port for connecting to the Modem, the Switch doesn't. At least that's the way my Network is set up with 2 printers and up to 6 Wired computers plus a few Wireless computers. As of now Internet download speeds [up to 30Mbps] in my area aren't as fast as the Network speed [100Mbps or 1000Mbps]. Like many things in computing the fastest system is slowed to the speed of the slowest part in the system, i.e. to get Gigabit speed the NIC and Router and/or Switch must be rated as the same, the Ethernet cable should be good quality CAT5 or newer CAT5e or CAT6.
    A network switch will normally just connect anything plugged into it together. So if the modem and the router are both connected to the switch they will operate normally. By connecting the PC to the switch the PC should have the faster 104 Mbps Internet speed as in the OP's #1 post, since the router is bypassed.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
    AMD FX8120 (8-core @ 3.1GHz) CPU, Gigabyte GA-990FXA-D3 motherboard, 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1866MHz RAM, ATI-AMD Radeon HD6770 PCI-E VGA, 480GB Kingston SSD, 2TB Seagate SATA3.0 HDD, ASUS DVD/RW.

  9. #9
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    2,383
    Thanks
    235
    Thanked 147 Times in 136 Posts
    You could probably bypass the router for the Ethernet connection to your PC by adding a switch between the modem and the router.
    But then of course he will be leaving his system unprotected by the router for a fewMB/s he doesn't miss at the moment...
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  10. #10
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,155
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 307 Times in 267 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by wavy View Post
    But then of course he will be leaving his system unprotected by the router for a fewMB/s he doesn't miss at the moment...
    In his #1 post the OP says he has a cable modem, which should have a NAT (Network Address Translation) firewall.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
    AMD FX8120 (8-core @ 3.1GHz) CPU, Gigabyte GA-990FXA-D3 motherboard, 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1866MHz RAM, ATI-AMD Radeon HD6770 PCI-E VGA, 480GB Kingston SSD, 2TB Seagate SATA3.0 HDD, ASUS DVD/RW.

  11. #11
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Los Gatos, CA
    Posts
    64
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    LesF, you should by your own modem. I believe Comcast raised their lease price to $10. You can pick up a Motorola Surfboard modem like the SB6122 for about $80. I bought mine over 2 years ago and that's a bit of money saved. You can check the Comcast site for compatible modems.

  12. #12
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    2,383
    Thanks
    235
    Thanked 147 Times in 136 Posts
    In his #1 post the OP says he has a cable modem, which should have a NAT (Network Address Translation) firewall.

    Not necessarily. I'm not double NATed on optimum. That tend to break a lot of thing with out tweaking, or so I have heard.

    Question for dmspen: Does having your own cable modem open more options ??

    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  13. #13
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    496
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 49 Times in 46 Posts
    Your Belkin router only has 2 shortcomings from what you've told us. It limits your ethernet-wired computer(s) to the old standard 10/100 speed, and it broadcasts a wireless signal whose range and power are not providing strong reception at the other end of your house.

    You have several options to improve things:

    1. Buy a second inexpensive router in the $15 - $20 range and use it as a wireless access point about halfway between your router and the distant room(s) of the house.

    or

    2. Buy a Powerline Adapter kit which includes one regular Powerline adapter to connect via ethernet cable to your Belkin router (or any new router) and one "wi-fi extender" adapter to plug into a power outlet in the area where you need stronger wi-fi reception. This adapter will re-broadcast the original signal from the router using the same SSID so moving your laptop nearer the main router will not require a different sign-in/password. We've successfully used a Netgear 500Mbps kit as well as a 300Mbps kit from TP-Link.

    or

    3. Buy a new router that is "dual-band". Make sure it's rated as N600 or higher and that the ethernet ports are rated as Gigabit (that's 10/100/1000). We've had good results with a TP-Link TL-WDR3600 model which costs around $50 - $55.

    You could, of course, combine option 3 with one of the other two options if desired.

    One other tip: If convenient, move your existing Belkin router nearer the open doorway of the room it's in. That might just improve wi-fi reception a little bit when you're 2 rooms away.

  14. #14
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,155
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 307 Times in 267 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by starvinmarvin View Post
    Your Belkin router only has 2 shortcomings from what you've told us. It limits your ethernet-wired computer(s) to the old standard 10/100 speed, and it broadcasts a wireless signal whose range and power are not providing strong reception at the other end of your house.

    You have several options to improve things:

    1. Buy a second inexpensive router in the $15 - $20 range and use it as a wireless access point about halfway between your router and the distant room(s) of the house.

    or

    2. Buy a Powerline Adapter kit which includes one regular Powerline adapter to connect via ethernet cable to your Belkin router (or any new router) and one "wi-fi extender" adapter to plug into a power outlet in the area where you need stronger wi-fi reception. This adapter will re-broadcast the original signal from the router using the same SSID so moving your laptop nearer the main router will not require a different sign-in/password. We've successfully used a Netgear 500Mbps kit as well as a 300Mbps kit from TP-Link.

    or

    3. Buy a new router that is "dual-band". Make sure it's rated as N600 or higher and that the ethernet ports are rated as Gigabit (that's 10/100/1000). We've had good results with a TP-Link TL-WDR3600 model which costs around $50 - $55.

    You could, of course, combine option 3 with one of the other two options if desired.

    One other tip: If convenient, move your existing Belkin router nearer the open doorway of the room it's in. That might just improve wi-fi reception a little bit when you're 2 rooms away.
    Your suggested 1. and 2. options are pointless since OP would still be connecting through the Belkin N150 router.

    Your 3. option makes some sense, but only if OP purchases a Comcast-compatible cable "Home Gateway" (thereby bypassing any need or a separate wireless router). The TP-Link TL-WDR3600 you have suggested does not seem to be cable-compatible so should not be considered.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
    AMD FX8120 (8-core @ 3.1GHz) CPU, Gigabyte GA-990FXA-D3 motherboard, 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1866MHz RAM, ATI-AMD Radeon HD6770 PCI-E VGA, 480GB Kingston SSD, 2TB Seagate SATA3.0 HDD, ASUS DVD/RW.

  15. #15
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    St Augustine & Thailand
    Posts
    168
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by scaisson View Post
    Router is like a tiny computer but is running only one program: routing. There will be overhead, maybe 10%-20%. On top of that, the internet side (WAN) speed is shared by all the local networks, be it wired or non-wired. These PCs share the total WAN speed. If only 1 local PC, it has all the WAN speed minus the router overhead.
    If you have other 'items' plugged into your router, but not working at the time, do they still siphon off their share of the signal, thus degrading the speed to a particular PC??

    I have a Netgear WNDR 3800 n600 dual band router that has a Roku box plugged into it, and a Philips VOIP phone plugged into it. With both of these 'not in operation' when I am using my laptop in a wireless fashion, is my wireless signal degraded, ..to an extent that I should consider up plugging them??

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •