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  1. #1
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    percent formula question

    IF

    a money transaction web page was literally showing

    1.75 to 1.55 = 27%
    How or what formula did they use to arrive to 27%

    The closest I can come to is (Cell A1) 1/75 to (Cell B1)1/55

    using formula in Cell D1 =(B1-A1)/ABS(A1)

    When I type in 1/75 and 1/55, I get 27395 and 20090 and arrive to -26.67%
    Which obviously rounds up to 27% as it appears.

    So what's happening when the web page is showing 1.75 to 1.55 = 27%

    How do they do this calculation and in what format in Excel ?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    WS Lounge VIP rory's Avatar
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    What's the page? My best guess would be that the first part is a range, not a subtraction.
    Regards,
    Rory

    Microsoft MVP - Excel

  3. #3
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    Link
    http://www.propun.com.au/racing_foru...achmentid=3606

    Thanks rory,
    it's actually an attachment of someone else's post, (unrelated topic).

    What I noticed on the near top left corner, or just below top left is

    "market mover 1.75 to 1.55 = 27%"

    How can I do this exact same calculation in Excel ?

    Thanks

  4. #4
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    To answer your question we need to know what the $1.75 and $1.55 represent.

  5. #5
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    MartinM
    To answer your question we need to know what the $1.75 and $1.55 represent.

    It represents a change or fluctuation in the price of xyz stock, buy/sell, in this case Odds

    Hope this is correct

    Thank you.

  6. #6
    WS Lounge VIP rory's Avatar
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    Those are the returns for a $1 stake (i.e. they include the original stake), so in terms of profit (or odds) change, it's actually (0.75-0.55)/0.75
    Last edited by rory; 2015-01-20 at 11:51.
    Regards,
    Rory

    Microsoft MVP - Excel

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  8. #7
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    Looks to me more like the return for a given stake (maybe $1 ?) in a horse race. Any taxes or other deductions could cause a complex relationship between the percentage shown and the two $ amounts.

    Or the two $ amounts might be illustrating the best and worst returns across the range of betting companies and the percentage figure a representation of the size of that range.

    You can see that I'm just guessing . . . that's all I can do.

    UPDATE: You can see that my post crossed with Rory's. He and I are headed in the same general direction though.

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  10. #8
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    Thanks,

    Are they correct when posting 1.75 to 1.55 = 27%


    So if I may reiterate my original question

    When I type in 1/75 and 1/55, I get 27395 and 20090 and arrive to -26.67%
    Which obviously rounds up to 27% as it appears.
    The workbook shows what I have tried so far.
    had to play around with formatting the cells to get it to work.

    Are these the correct formula ?
    Attached Files Attached Files

  11. #9
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    Rory's explanation is the correct one.

    In one case you bet $1.00 and win 75c and get your stake back: a total of $1.75
    In the other case you bet $1.00 and win 55c and get your stake back: a total of $1.55

    So your winnings have gone from 75c to 55c which is a reduction of 27% (strictly 26.666... %)

    So the formula for the percentage shown on the webpage is ((1.75-1)-(1.55 - 1))/(1.75 -1).
    I have put this formula into the yellow cell in your example Workbook v2, attached.

    Of course you can simplify the formula to (1.75 - 1.55)/(1.75 - 1) if you like - I was just showing the full calculation for clarity.
    Attached Files Attached Files

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  13. #10
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    ah ha ! the penny drops yet again, forgot about the -1 within the formula, it makes sense now

    Thanks

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