Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Rancho Palos Verdes, California, USA
    Posts
    29
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Cannot boot Normal Startup in windows 7

    Today, for no apparent reason, my computer would not boot correctly. (Windows 7 64x Professional.)
    Msconfig will not accept Normal Startup or Diagnostic Startup but only Selective Startup with only grey arrows in the boxes.
    As a result there are only a few services loaded and I cannot start any more. I have no Internet connection, no Sound, etc.

    My system has 3 hard drives with a different OS on each: C: Windows 7, D: Windows XP and F: Windows Technical Preview (10). XP and 10 boot normally and all functions work correctly.

    I have a clean image file backup which I installed using my rescue disk but the reinstallation of the image did not fix the problem

    I cannot run Backup and Restore, sfc /scannow,
    Device Manager shows everything normal.
    I ran both TDDSKiller from cd and found no malware.
    I have run out of ideas other than a complete wipe and reinstall so I am hoping that someone out there in cyber space has some useful suggestions

  2. #2
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Durham UK
    Posts
    6,610
    Thanks
    147
    Thanked 870 Times in 832 Posts
    If you are able to boot to the Advanced boot page by tapping F8 as you switch on, you can try Last Known Good Configuration.

    You can also select Safe Mode with Command Prompt and see if the sfc /scannow will execute then.

    Using the Safe Mode with Networking option to see if connectivity returns can determine if it's your AV program or something that you've downloaded is causing the mayhem.

    You should also have a Repair your Computer option.

    You can use this to navigate to the Recovery Environment (RE) to select either Startup Repair and run that up to three times (although it never seems to be able to resolve anything), use the Restore Point option or select the Command Prompt where you can enter chkdsk c: /r to see what that reports.

    As you have recently restored with a system image, check to see if you have any restore points first before trying that option.

    As I assume you have an install disk for your Win 7 Pro you can also boot up with that and do something with the MBR http://www.7tutorials.com/command-pr...r-boot-records
    Last edited by Sudo15; 2015-02-01 at 06:08.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Sudo15 For This Useful Post:

    nobble (2015-02-01)

  4. #3
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Rancho Palos Verdes, California, USA
    Posts
    29
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks for your excellent and quick response.
    I have solved the problem but I don't know what caused it. After thinking about all of the different issues at fault, I wondered if somehow the BIOS got screwed up. My Gigabyte MB has a CMOS reset switch so I used it, rebooted and the problems were gone!

  5. #4
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Polk County, Florida
    Posts
    3,760
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked 424 Times in 338 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by nobble View Post
    Thanks for your excellent and quick response.
    I have solved the problem but I don't know what caused it. After thinking about all of the different issues at fault, I wondered if somehow the BIOS got screwed up. My Gigabyte MB has a CMOS reset switch so I used it, rebooted and the problems were gone!
    Thanks for posting your solution.

    Here's a tip for other dual (or triple) booters. If you suspect malware in an OS that won't boot properly, you can run your AV/AM on that OS from the one that will boot as it should. The malware's defenses are useless when the infected OS is not booted, and the malware is much more easily eradicated.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2015-02-02 at 09:52. Reason: spelling
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  6. #5
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    6,792
    Thanks
    117
    Thanked 798 Times in 719 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    Thanks for posting you solution.

    Here's a tip for other dual (or triple) booters. If you suspect malware in an OS that won't boot properly, you can run your AV/AM on that OS from the one that will boot as it should. The malware's defenses are useless when the infected OS is not booted, and the malware is much more easily eradicated.
    While that procedure will fix some issues, I don't believe the AM/AV software will scan the registry of the infected OS. I would try safe mode scanning first.

    Jerry

  7. #6
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Durham UK
    Posts
    6,610
    Thanks
    147
    Thanked 870 Times in 832 Posts
    It's difficult to know what could have screwed up the BIOS but glad you got it sorted and thanks for the update.

    You can use the Thread Tools dropdown to Mark Thread as Solved if you're happy and want to close the thread.

  8. #7
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Polk County, Florida
    Posts
    3,760
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked 424 Times in 338 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    While that procedure will fix some issues, I don't believe the AM/AV software will scan the registry of the infected OS. I would try safe mode scanning first.

    Jerry
    AV/AM software does not launch regedit to scan the registry. It scans the hive files in the Windows folder. Online, malware can put up defenses. Offline, nothing is active, no defenses are resident live anywhere, and the hive files are still the hive files.

    Whenever I've dealt with client machines that were infected and their AV/AM was ineffective, I've done an offline scan (put the drive in a dock) using my AV/AM, and I've never had a problem with producing a clean machine using that method. I hardly ever use safe mode for anything.

    Windows Defender Offline works in the same way. It boots into its own tiny version of Windows OS, goes online for definition updates, and then scans the suspect Windows installation while it's offline. All the AV/AM defenses are dead, and it has nowhere to hide.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  9. #8
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    6,792
    Thanks
    117
    Thanked 798 Times in 719 Posts
    I agree that an off line scan, either from another OS or a drive dock is the safest, but I've never run into a problem using On line or Safe Mode scanning with my AV/AM of choice. I was just never sure that the registry would be scanned off line, but what you say makes sense.

    Jerry

  10. #9
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Polk County, Florida
    Posts
    3,760
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked 424 Times in 338 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    I agree that an off line scan, either from another OS or a drive dock is the safest, but I've never run into a problem using On line or Safe Mode scanning with my AV/AM of choice. I was just never sure that the registry would be scanned off line, but what you say makes sense.

    Jerry
    I've dealt with some non-booters and partial-booters where even boot options were unavailable. There are some tenacious bits of malware out there, particularly those where the user clicks on a link in an email while running as a member of the Administrators group—those get unfettered access to everything, killing any and all AV/AM programs so that they aren't even accessible from any angle except from offline.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  11. #10
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,153
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 306 Times in 266 Posts
    Another way is to remove the HDD from the PC and connect it to another PC, then boot the other PC as normal. Once Windows is running you can run scans on the attached suspect HDD.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
    AMD FX8120 (8-core @ 3.1GHz) CPU, Gigabyte GA-990FXA-D3 motherboard, 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1866MHz RAM, ATI-AMD Radeon HD6770 PCI-E VGA, 480GB Kingston SSD, 2TB Seagate SATA3.0 HDD, ASUS DVD/RW.

  12. #11
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Polk County, Florida
    Posts
    3,760
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked 424 Times in 338 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Another way is to remove the HDD from the PC and connect it to another PC, then boot the other PC as normal. Once Windows is running you can run scans on the attached suspect HDD.
    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    Whenever I've dealt with client machines that were infected and their AV/AM was ineffective, I've done an offline scan (put the drive in a dock) using my AV/AM, and I've never had a problem with producing a clean machine using that method.
    An offline scan is an offline scan. Using a drive dock just eliminates the need to open up a PC in order to do it.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •