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    Desktop Problem

    Having problems with my desktop view, keeps changing from one view to another, and then back to
    the normal one I use. See attachments.
    There is a message on the event viewer "Microsoft Security Client OOBE" stopped. Is this the cause
    and how do I solve the problem?
    Have not had this happen before. I run MSE, and Malwarebytes Premium.
    Please help.

    Desktop February 2015.pngDesktop incorrect.pngMicrosoft Security Client OOBE error.png

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    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    Dave, that looks like the resolution is switching from the native 16:9 to 4:3, probably down to an issue with (something interfering with?) graphics drivers.

    I doubt if it's down to the MSE error, you'll need to look deeper into the Applications and System logs, maybe the WER log from the (bottom of) output from MSInfo32.

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    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Looks to me like your screen resolution in your first pic is what I would expect, but it is a lower resolution in the second pic.

    You should probably check for an update for your display drivers.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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    Thank you guys. I will try both.

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    3 Star Lounger Not Brightest Bulb's Avatar
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    Just curious, believe I counted 58 shortcuts. I have always tried to keep desktop shortcuts down. Somewhere I heard that the more shortcuts the longer the boot up time.

    Is that a fairy tale?

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    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    It might slow the preemptive caching down a little, use a few more resource % points; hardly likely to be significant on any decent, modern computer.

    If the shortcuts or other data on the Desktop are frequently accessed, load times for them may be reduced enough to negate or overturn the extra second or so at boot.

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    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not Brightest Bulb View Post
    ...Somewhere I heard that the more shortcuts the longer the boot up time.

    Is that a fairy tale?
    Yes.

    But I have had a number of customers who had folders, containing 100MB or more, on their desktop. That can, and often does, slow computers down.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not Brightest Bulb View Post
    Just curious, believe I counted 58 shortcuts. I have always tried to keep desktop shortcuts down. Somewhere I heard that the more shortcuts the longer the boot up time.

    Is that a fairy tale?
    It's more about what the icons represent - if those items inserted themselves into the Startup menu then that would slow things down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo15 View Post
    It's more about what the icons represent - if those items inserted themselves into the Startup menu then that would slow things down.
    That's interesting because If there is something on start menu then why would shortcut be needed or vice versa. Think I will check my start menu in case.

    It might slow the preemptive caching down a little, use a few more resource % points; hardly likely to be significant on any decent, modern computer.

    If the shortcuts or other data on the Desktop are frequently accessed, load times for them may be reduced enough to negate or overturn the extra second or so at boot.
    Well wherever I got my info from it said more than seconds would be added to it. It was before I jumped on this forum. I'm gonna stick with this forums info.

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    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not Brightest Bulb View Post
    Just curious, believe I counted 58 shortcuts. I have always tried to keep desktop shortcuts down. Somewhere I heard that the more shortcuts the longer the boot up time.

    Is that a fairy tale?
    Quote Originally Posted by satrow View Post
    It might slow the preemptive caching down a little, use a few more resource % points; hardly likely to be significant on any decent, modern computer.

    If the shortcuts or other data on the Desktop are frequently accessed, load times for them may be reduced enough to negate or overturn the extra second or so at boot.
    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Not Brightest Bulb View Post
    ...Somewhere I heard that the more shortcuts the longer the boot up time.

    Is that a fairy tale?
    Yes.

    But I have had a number of customers who had folders, containing 100MB or more, on their desktop. That can, and often does, slow computers down.
    There is a bit of misunderstanding here in how the desktop works and what it is.

    On the Windows 7 side of my dual boot, one of my accounts has 139 icons and 3 folders on the desktop. Another has 60 icons, no folders. Going from the all users logon screen to logon either account takes under 2 seconds; the times seem identical.

    So I decided to be even more definitive in this logon time vs total desktop icons/folders. I copied a folder of pictures which contains 92 subfolders along with 104 individual .jpg's not in folders, 17.8GB total size. It took well over 5 minutes just for the copy. I then went back to the all users logon screen. I first logged on the account with only 60 desktop icons, under 2 seconds again. I then logged off, back to the all users logon screen. Next I logged on the account that had 139 icons, now 4 folders, one of which was 17.8GB in size. Under 2 seconds again. Still no noticeable difference in logon times between the two accounts.

    Most of the time involved in a logon (under two seconds) is in reading and applying the personalized settings for that account, hardly any of the time is involved in presenting the actual view of the desktop. The desktop is only a folder. Personalizing the desktop amounts to view settings for that folder. It actually opens in explorer. To see what I mean, open Task Manager, scroll down to Windows Explorer, right-click it and select "End task". Your desktop will disappear. Any active windows will still be there, just on a blank background. Select "File > New task", browse to "C:\Windows\explorer.exe", highlight it and click Open, click OK, and there's your desktop again, almost instantly.

    When you logon, all that is really happening is pixels being lit on the monitor in a particular view setting. There are no real background processes associated with those icons in that view setting going on; that happens when the account details are read. Once the personalized settings for the account have been read and applied, painting the desktop happens at the refresh rate of your monitor, typically 60Hz (which means the view is being "repainted" 60 times per second).

    On logon, the "Desktop" is simply a folder view being presented in explorer. That's it. So it doesn't matter if you have 3 icons or 300 icons, whether there are lots of folders packed full of files or no folders at all. It's still just a folder view being presented in explorer.

    Items in the Startup folder in the Start Menu are a different matter, as those items are actually loading in the background, which can indeed slow the logon process. Those items in the Startup folder may also have icons on the desktop, but it's the stuff in the Startup folder, not the desktop view, that can slow things down a bit.

    As for the OP, often a cold boot (complete power down, then power on) will cure glitches that are occurring on Restart (warm boot).
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
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    Have updated nVidia, so far so good. Do I need to worry about "Microsoft Security Client' stopped in the event viewer? Have Googled this
    and it seems it has been going on for a long time.

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    A certain amount of what you say is correct, but you are quite mistaken re "icons".

    What you call "icons" on your desktop are not icons, they are shortcuts.

    An "icon" is a small graphic image w/ file extension .ico, usually 16x16 pixels or 32x32 pixels. Icons are most often used by shortcuts (file extension .lnk) files to give visual indication as to what the shortcut does.

    It is mistaken, and misleading, to call shortcuts "icons".
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    All icons are not shortcuts

    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    A certain amount of what you say is correct, but you are quite mistaken re "icons".

    What you call "icons" on your desktop are not icons, they are shortcuts.

    An "icon" is a small graphic image w/ file extension .ico, usually 16x16 pixels or 32x32 pixels. Icons are most often used by shortcuts (file extension .lnk) files to give visual indication as to what the shortcut does.

    It is mistaken, and misleading, to call shortcuts "icons".
    But they are icons, and not all icons are shortcuts. It is mistaken and misleading to call icons "shortcuts". A "Shortcut" is in reality little more than a text file with a .lnk extension. The .lnk extension gives the shortcut its hook (through file association) into the API that opens whatever the text file is targeting. "Icons" can be much more, but all shortcuts on the desktop are represented by icons, small graphics files, yes. Some icons on the desktop represent actual files or folders that are in the desktop folder, but the desktop "view", what one sees after logon, is still a folder view; it's a system folder, but one sees a folder view, nonetheless, with icons.

    The desktop folder is somewhat unique in its view settings, in that it can display a background image of the users choice, but what it does display are icons representing links, files, system folders such as "My Computer" or "This PC", depending on which Windows one is operating, as well as folders one has placed in/on the desktop. The icon of a folder one has placed on/in the desktop, by the way, is not a shortcut; it's a subfolder in the desktop folder. There's no "shortcut" to it, because you're already there.

    One can easily change the icon that represents most shortcuts. System icons (default icons that are associated with file types) come from .dll files chock full of different icons. One can also use various graphics utilities to change or create personalized icons which the desktop folder view will use without protest. But icons are merely graphic representatives of shortcuts/files/folders in the desktop folder.

    To get a better understanding, open a Command Prompt (don't use Run as administrator) and the prompt will read (without the quotes) "C:\Users\<username>\>". Type (without the quotes) "dir" and hit Enter. You'll see a Command view of your User folder, with Desktop (represented by "DIR") being a subfolder in your User folder. Type (without the quotes) "cd desktop", and hit Enter; the prompt will change to "C:\Users\<username>\Desktop>".

    Next, type (without the quotes) "dir", and hit Enter. You will now see a Command view of your desktop folder. No icons. Just file and folder (if you have any folders on/in your desktop) names. Folder names will be preceded by <DIR>, indicating that they are folders (however, you will not see "My Computer" or "Recycle Bin"). Filenames will have various extensions, the majority of which will be .lnk, some will be .url, you may have some others, such as .pdf or .doc or .docx or .txt. The file associations of those extensions determine what happens when one double-clicks an icon on the desktop. A .txt file, for example, will typically open Notepad with the contents of that .txt file displayed. Double-click a .pdf file and it will open in the .pdf viewer associated with .pdf files.

    Bottom line, what one sees on one's desktop are icons, representing a number of types, not all of which are shortcuts. In the graphic below are two icons on my desktop with the same name with their Properties sheets opened below them. One is a shortcut to a text file in my desktop folder, next to it is the text file in my desktop folder. They can have the same apparent name because the names are actually different in extension. On the left is "New Text Document.txt.lnk", and on the right is "New Text Document.txt". I don't need the shortcut, it's just an illustration of what I'm trying to explain; not all icons are shortcuts.



    Icon example.PNG
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    ...not all icons are shortcuts...
    So why this strange insistence on calling "shortcuts" (.lnk files as indicated by the upward-pointing arrows on them) "icons" (.ico graphics files)?

    See this File shortcut Wikipedia article.
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    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    So why this strange insistence on calling "shortcuts" (.lnk files as indicated by the upward-pointing arrows on them) "icons" (.ico graphics files)?

    See this File shortcut Wikipedia article.
    It is really quite simple. If it's not a .lnk file, it's not a shortcut. Right-click and select Properties, and it's just as plain as day. (Review the graphic in my last post. The shortcut Properties sheet has a Shortcut tab; the file Properties sheet does not have a Shortcut tab, because it's not a shortcut.) On the desktop, all shortcuts are represented with icons. However, not all icons on the desktop represent shortcuts. But they are all represented by icons. Notice that a folder on the desktop is represented by a folder icon, but there is no arrow; it's not a shortcut—it's a subfolder in the desktop folder. One can place a shortcut to a folder (that's in some other location) on the desktop, and that will be a shortcut, arrow and everything.

    It's quite easy to visualize if one right-clicks an open space on the desktop and selects Sort by > Item type. All the icons that are not representing shortcuts will be grouped together, and all the icons that are representing shortcuts will be grouped together. There may be two groups of non-shortcut icons, depending on file type, probably separated by the actual shortcuts group of icons. On my Windows 8.1 desktop are 21 icons that do not represent shortcuts (they're not .lnk files). Two are system icons (called "Desktop Icons"), "Computer" (renamed from "This PC") and Recycle Bin, 5 are folder icons representing subfolders in the desktop folder, 9 represent text files that are in the desktop folder, 2 are .PNG files in the desktop folder, 1 is a .REG file in the desktop folder, and 5 are .pdf files in the desktop folder.

    There are 44 icons representing shortcuts to files in other locations. On my Windows 7 desktop, icons representing folders and files outnumber icons representing shortcuts by over two to one. From your link, "In computing, a file shortcut is a handle in a user interface that allows the user to find a file or resource located in a different directory or folder from the place where the shortcut is located." Those icons that represent files and/or folders in the desktop folder are not shortcuts; the files and/or folders are not in a different directory or folder—they are in the desktop folder.

    To make it as simple as possible, open Explorer, navigate to the C:\Users\<username>\Desktop folder, and click on Desktop in the left pane. In the right pane you'll see all the items that are visible on your Desktop, except for the system icons. In a Details view, the default columns are Name, Date modified, Type, and Size. In the Type column, folders are listed as folders, shortcuts are listed as shortcuts, files are listed as file types. If it's not listed as a shortcut, then it's not a shortcut, it's whatever it is typed as. Can't get much simpler than that.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2015-02-04 at 00:19. Reason: spelling
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

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