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Thread: Backups

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    Backups

    Quick question please.Is it possible to do Macrium backups and say EaseUs backups on the same
    external harddrive?

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    Of course, as long as the backups are stored in separate folders (partitions).

    Zig

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    As you are creating backups / images and storing them in files you can put the files anywhere. If you have a look in the destination folder you will see the files created by your backup program.

    cheers, Paul

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    Thanks Zig and Paul.

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    Probably not essential, but it would be a good idea to partition your external hard drive into separate logical drives, one for each type of backup, e.g Drive X for Macrium backups and drive Y for EASUS ones. If you are ever forced to recover from a backup by booting from a recovery disk, this may help the relevant software to find its own backups.

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    Or just use appropriately named directories.

    cheers, Paul

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    Separate directories are USELESS if they are in the same partition and that single partition suffers disaster.
    Use different backup partitions so that if one fails you still have the other one available.

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    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    No more so than if you use separate partitions and the disk suffers disaster. The likelihood of a partition failure is low. If you are really concerned, your are better off using different directories and backing up to two different disks, alternating between them.

    Jerry

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    The last few posts (#5 - #8) raise possible confusion between what is meant by "partition", "drive", "directory" and "folder". From a hardware POV (Point Of View) a "drive" means the entire data-storage available on a physical drive, but from a software POV a "drive" can (and usually does) mean much the same as "partition", i.e.: a specified area of data-storage on a physical drive. Within "drive" or "partition" we can have "directories" or "folders", which are special "container" files; these "container" files serve little real purpose other than to address the location of "files" which contain the actual data stored on the disk.
    In his #8 post Jerry points out the real issue - little use whether you store your backups in "directories" ("folders") or on different "partitions" on the same physical drive, if that drive fails then it doesn't matter what method you used; the actual data is likely to be practicably inaccessible.
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    All the above is true, but what are the chances that both the drive in question and the disk containing its backups fail at the same time???

    Zig

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    Pretty good if you have a fire or flood.

    cheers, Paul

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    Two different drives the safer way to go?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zig View Post
    All the above is true, but what are the chances that both the drive in question and the disk containing its backups fail at the same time???

    Zig
    You have a better chance of winning the lottery than having two drives fail at once. You can dream up all kinds of failure cases. Personally, i use one external backup disk and I don't lose any sleep over the remote possibility that my system disks and backup disk fail at the same time or being subject to fire loss or any other forms of pestulance... YMMV Use the backup strategy you are comfortable with.

    Jerry

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    Pretty good if you have a fire or flood.

    cheers, Paul
    Off Site storage of a second or third drive, or for data, Cloud Backup, should relieve this issue.

    As mentioned in this thread, backup archives, no matter what program made them, are just very big files or groups of files. They can be treated as such and copied, moved or deleted.
    -- Bob Primak --

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