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    Does processing speed really matter?

    Assuming that all other things are pretty much equal (OS, Graphics Card, RAM, etc.), will I really see a performance difference between my old computer (2.93 GHz processing speed) and a new one I am thinking of buying (3.7 GHz)?

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    MDR,

    You'll have to provide more information about the processors the clock speed is only one factor to consider.
    How many cores in each processor?
    How many threads per core?
    32 or 64 bit processors?
    L1/L2/L3 cache sizes?
    Processor chip transistor size, e.g. 20, 18, 16, 14, 12 Nano Meter (the closer the transistors the quicker the processor).
    I'm probably missing something but you get the idea.

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    Do you have programs that can use the power of multi-core CPUs or Dual CPUs [2 physical CPUs]?

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    More recent CPUs process commands quicker for a given clock speed.
    If all you are doing is replacing a CPU then I can think of better ways to spend your money - SSD, backup, beer, not necessarily in that order!

    cheers, Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by MDRapp View Post
    Assuming that all other things are pretty much equal (OS, Graphics Card, RAM, etc.), will I really see a performance difference between my old computer (2.93 GHz processing speed) and a new one I am thinking of buying (3.7 GHz)?
    Short answer is YES. Certainly, other things factor into the equation but, as you put the question, YES. For the average Usrs an Intel i3 (Dual-core) is usually fine. If the demands are a bit higher then, an Intel i5 (Quad-core). Things are getting fairly extreme when an i7 seems wanted or fitting.

    But, aside from all that, YES, you should see a performance improvement.

    You can do heaps of things to speed up or keep a machine @ a good pace. But, cannot make a silk purse of a sow's ear... if not, very, robust will not be made into a screamer. But, the 3.7 will be noticeably faster than the old one. And the newer CPUs are better @ what they do than older ones; the technology has improved.

    Would, also, recommend making sure the new CPU supports 'V'; most decent modern ones do... nice to be able to use Hyper-V. Certainly, @ least, most i3s & i5s are Vs.

    Cheers,
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    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDRapp View Post
    Assuming that all other things are pretty much equal (OS, Graphics Card, RAM, etc.), will I really see a performance difference between my old computer (2.93 GHz processing speed) and a new one I am thinking of buying (3.7 GHz)?
    Whether or not there will be a noticeable performance difference depends very much on how you use your computer.

    If you are primarily browsing the internet, watching Youtube video clips, using email, using facebook or other social media, the speed of your internet connection has very much more influence on performance than any difference in processing speed.

    There may be a difference in the speed of starting up the computer and shutting it down, but that is the tiniest percentage of most users' computer time. I have a laptop that is nearly 12 years old, has a 1.4GHz Pentium M single core processor, and it's just as fast on the internet as my desktop, which has a 3.4GHz i5 4-core CPU.

    Without a lot more information, your question is not an easy one to answer.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDRapp View Post
    Assuming that all other things are pretty much equal (OS, Graphics Card, RAM, etc.), will I really see a performance difference between my old computer (2.93 GHz processing speed) and a new one I am thinking of buying (3.7 GHz)?
    Provided you choose a processor with more than one core, yes, your multitasking abilities & performance will be quite nicely improved over a single core weaker processor.
    I've got an 8 core, 3GHz processor, but for many a dual or quad core is more than sufficient.

    I don't care how you use your computer, it doesn't matter if all you do is internet surfing, you'll always benefit with a more powerful
    multi-core processor as opposed to just a weaker single core.

    I've worked on too many sh*t boxes with weak single core 2.something GHz processors, and they just suck. [period]
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    Why Hyper-V? (Utterly ignorant here.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Auggie View Post
    Why Hyper-V? (Utterly ignorant here.)
    It's Microsoft's Virtual Machine platform that requires hardware support in the CPU.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

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    Quote Originally Posted by MDRapp View Post
    Assuming that all other things are pretty much equal (OS, Graphics Card, RAM, etc.), will I really see a performance difference between my old computer (2.93 GHz processing speed) and a new one I am thinking of buying (3.7 GHz)?
    Keeping everything else the same I think it will come down to how many cores your new processor has. If it is the same number of cores, you may notice an improvement but I don't think you will be impressed. I have 8 cores and the performance monitor shows most of them idle most of the time so increasing from 4 cores will probably not be impressive. Increasing from 2 cores might be a better situation. Your running programs will not improve much but your background programs will get a chance to get off the core that your foreground program is using. (having 2GB of RAM per core could help - assuming you are running 64 bit OS)

    Take a look at your Windows Experience score. It might be more worthwhile to go SSD if you are not already there.

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    Generally speaking, speed only helps in three situations if you are not using the computer for heavy processing.
    1 Down/up loading large files or graphics.
    2 Virus scanning.
    3 Backing up your system.
    In most of these cases the speed of the HDD/SSD is more limiting than the speed of the processor.
    If you are gaming then processor speed is important.

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    I keep getting the [Not responding] temporary hang. Resource Monitor shows that my RAM is maxing out so I suspect upping it to 8GB may have more effect than anything else. But 2x 4GB of RAM is pricey!

    Component Details Performance Subscore
    Processor Pentium(R) Dual-Core CPU T4300 @ 2.10GHz ... 5.4
    Memory (RAM) 4.00 GB ... 5.4
    Graphics Mobile Intel(R) 4 Series Express Chipset Family ... 3.5
    Gaming graphics 1695 MB Total available graphics memory ... 3.3
    Primary hard disk 151GB Free (400GB Total) ... 5.6

    I found turning Aero off and clearing the desktop of widgets significantly improved speed.

  14. #13
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    Assuming you already have an SSD, plenty of RAM and no malware slowing down the system then upgrading to a faster processor will mainly benefit you in tasks that require more than several seconds to complete.
    As an example, our 4 year-old basic laptop with Windows 7, an Intel Pentium P6100 dual-core 2.0GHz processor, Kingston 96GB SSD and 6GB of DDR3 RAM boots and runs almost the same as our Windows 7 PC with an Intel Core i7 (quad-core) at 3.2GHz, Sandisk 240GB SSD and 12GB of DDR3 RAM. However, when i run several tasks at the same time, or edit/transcode video, or play 3D games then it's a very different story. The quad-core 3.2GHz machine is much, much faster.
    Long story short, light use equals small-ish benefit with faster processor. Heavier use equals greater benefit with faster processor.

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    It sounds like you have some unwanted apps running on your machine all the time.
    Most software sets itself up to load on startup, then it sits there running, using processor time unnecessarily.
    Start> type in [ MsConfig.exe ] enter.
    look in the startup menu and stop all unnecessary processes. You can still rum them with the desktop icon, they just take longer to start.
    shutdown/restart.
    This will stop many leaches.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dsf View Post
    my RAM is maxing out
    When this happens Windows will swap memory to disk and you will have very high disk use. I would do is find out what programs have consumed all your RAM. If you need to use them all then you must add more memory. Adding memory is best done by replacing the existing to guarantee there are no timing problems with mismatched memory.

    cheers, Paul

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