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  1. #1
    New Lounger hudson2001's Avatar
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    Question Moved user folder shortcut not showing actual folder contents (missing non-default folders)

    I just got a new computer with a 250GB SSD and we put in a 2TB internal drive. I did the official Windows right-click and move the default folders via the Location tab. I verified everything was where it should be. Then I transferred all my data via our network and this is where it gets interesting.

    I have a few "extra" (non-default) folders in my top-level User (Jen) folder (for example, Dropbox, Laptop Backup, and My Projects) just because I didn't want them buried inside other default folders. But these folders seem to disappear when navigating to Jen via a shortcut.

    The 12 folders I see when clicking the Jen shortcut (on desktop or via Start|Jen)--which I thought would take me to the correct place since I officially moved it via Windows:



    The two folders I see when clicking on C:/Users/Jen (the downloads is just temporary storage--that's not an issue)--this is what I expect to see:



    But when I navigate directly to D:/Jen, ALL the correct 18 folders are there--including my critical ALL BACKUP FILES and Dropbox:



    So there are six complete folders missing when I use the Windows-created Jen shortcut!!!

    I am assuming the "move" command doesn't affect the shortcut somehow? If that's the case, I'm fine with creating my own damn shortcut...but in the meantime I am completely lost.

    A friend said

    Yeah, the shortcut is wrong. I think this is Microsoft's way of encouraging you to use libraries though.
    Okay, if it's wrong I can deal with that...but I'm not understanding how can it be wrong?

    The actual (moved) Jen user folder has folders 1-18.
    The shortcut to the Jen folder shows 12 folders.

    How can a shortcut only show random folders? What is it about those non-default folders that doesn't let them show up? I'm guessing it's obviously related to them being non-default folders.

    Can I change the shortcut to Jen that appears on the Start menu? I guess I don't really need it because I'll just create a basic shortcut on the desktop...but I do find myself using it now and again. But...if it doesn't happen automatically like it should then I guess it would require a registry hack...? And worst case, I guess I can move those problem folders elsewhere...

    Thanks for any input.

  2. #2
    New Lounger hudson2001's Avatar
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    Well, I just put the correct Jen shortcut in the Start Menu and customized the right side to NOT show the user folder. I had completely forgot about all the customization I could do with that stuff--but I found it when I was trying to figure out how to get my flyout Control Panel again.

    But, that said, I'd still like to know WHY it wasn't shortcutting to the entire folder contents. Any ideas?

  3. #3
    New Lounger hudson2001's Avatar
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    Apparently the windows-provided "shortcuts" in the Start Menu are not really shortcuts per se but are rather shortcuts to Libraries---which is ASININE.

    I'll just say that having an SSD is awesome, but having my data elsewhere is proving to be a bit bigger pain than I'd remembered. (I must have last done it before Libraries were a thing.)

  4. #4
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Yes, it is a libraries thing and one of the many reasons I don't use libraries, and have disabled them. Of course, lots of folks use libraries and like them.

    I use a physical move of the Users folders and the Program Files folders to separate partitions on a second drive, but it's not for the faint of heart (lots of registry editing and such).
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  5. #5
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    I don't recommend moving any Windows default folders. Copy them elsewhere, and direct all programs to send their output to your chosen destination. Moving Windows default folders possibly can lead to big problems if a reInstall of the OS or a System Repair is made.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  6. #6
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RolandJS View Post
    I don't recommend moving any Windows default folders.
    Too late; I've been doing it since the late '90's. By all means, it is for experienced uses only, but it does work quite well. My split-up Windows 7 (two separate drives) boots faster than my non-split Windows 8.1 on the same PC (dual boot setup). Upgrading to SSHD's narrowed the gap, but Windows 7 in my setup is still faster. It is not only boot times that improve, overall system performance is also improved.

    Here are the differences in boot times.

    Copy them elsewhere, and direct all programs to send their output to your chosen destination. Moving Windows default folders possibly can lead to big problems if a reInstall of the OS or a System Repair is made.
    Using drive imaging exclusively for backup makes those two scenarios non-issues.

    But again, it is for experienced users only. I don't recommend it for casual users. More details . . .
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

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