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  1. #1
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    Linux for Windows users: Installing Ubuntu




    TOP STORY

    Linux for Windows users: Installing Ubuntu


    By David Robinson

    In a February article, we gave a brief introduction to Linux and its history, showing why some Windows users might want to experiment with this open-source OS. This follow-up story will tell you how to install and run one of the more popular Linux distributions Ubuntu.

    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/top-story/linux-for-windows-users-installing-ubuntu (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.

  2. #2
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    I subscribe to Windows Secrets to get information on Microsoft Windows, not how to install and use other operating systems. I am not partisan and use other operating systems apart from Windows, but I find it objectionable that Windows Secrets is being used to proselytize other operating systems.

    If I wanted to get info on Ubuntu or Linux, then I'd subscribe to the appropriate newsletter and forums. There are plenty of them out there.

    If you continue in this vein I'll simply cancel my subscription and walk away.

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    Altos (2015-04-09)

  4. #3
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    I personally don't get the objection to one article on a "different technology"...given that 99% of the total content of Windows Secrets is Windows-based.

    The Susan Bradley Patch Watch column alone is well worth the price of subscription (which, BTW you determine what you pay), not to mention Fred Langa's column, which I have followed for many years.

    If you ever have to make, or use a Linux boot disk to fix or restore your system, it helps to know a little about Linux.

    Here's a good example of using Linux to fix Windows problems...

    http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/31804...ur-windows-pc/
    Last edited by jwoods; 2015-04-09 at 02:52.

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  6. #4
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    Nothing wrong with Ubuntu cyclops. The fun was installing the 64-bit version in a virtual machine (did so over a year ago and then had to do the same when I had to replace my system this past summer). Never bad to learn how other OSs work.

  7. #5
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    I was compelled to register just to add my objection to this article. I echo cyclops' sentiments. This is Windows Secrets, not Linux Secrets. I kindly ask that you stop publishing these articles. If you continue to do so I, like cyclops, will cancel my subscription.

  8. #6
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    Why was my initial reply not posted? It said "awaiting moderator approval" or words to that effect, and it's still not here...

    You make the weak case that Linux can be used to fix Windows problems. Sure it can. But that was not your article - you did not show how to use a bootable Linux disk to fix Windows. Rather, you simply showed how to install Linux as an alternative to Windows.

    Let me reiterate: I am not partisan. I use and have used Linux for years. I installed one of Mark Shuttleworth's first distros of Ubuntu. Canonical's main development office is just around the corner.

    What I object to you is the proselytising of Linux in a Windows newsletter. This is not the first - there was another a week or two ago. And they both make gratuitous comments from a partisan perspective. That is objectionable.

    Like Altos above, I went through the whole effort of registereing for yet another forum precisely to register my objection. I have subscribed to Fred Langa's newsletter more or less since he started, and that's how I ended up in Windows Secrets.

    But you seem determined to turn it into something else.

    There are far better newsletters and articles on how to install Linux (of whatever distro) than this one in a Windows newsletter called Windows Secrets.

    Please stick to the knitting. Or your customers will find another jersey. I'm teetering.
    Last edited by cyclops; 2015-04-09 at 07:10.

  9. #7
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    Some of us don't live in a Windows only world anymore. Love Windows, but your article helped me bring up Ubuntu on an older laptop. The scientific community at my university is Linux and I can now live comfortably in both worlds.

    Thanks

  10. #8
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    Could not agree more.

    Quote Originally Posted by cyclops View Post
    I subscribe to Windows Secrets to get information on Microsoft Windows, not how to install and use other operating systems. I am not partisan and use other operating systems apart from Windows, but I find it objectionable that Windows Secrets is being used to proselytize other operating systems.

    If I wanted to get info on Ubuntu or Linux, then I'd subscribe to the appropriate newsletter and forums. There are plenty of them out there.

    If you continue in this vein I'll simply cancel my subscription and walk away.
    It has been "The Year of Linux" for nearly two decades. Linux probably is wonderful and I agree both Android and Apple used it as the basis for parts (if not most) of their O/S. That said, the Linux community is insufferably arrogant and brutal to newbies. There are a many apps to choose from. So many, in fact, the community is guilty of a first month salesperson's mistake of overwhelming the prospect with options. Whenever that happens, the safe selection is 'none of the above'.

    Wrap Linux in a pretty package, select and perfect a series of apps that mimic the productivity of Apple, Android, and Windows. Decide which two or three Linux distros the community will support and encourage and allow the user a clean choice. Until that day, Linux is obfuscation personified.

    Yes. I know... Linux is all about choices. So many most choose not to make a mistake.

  11. #9
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    I love Ubuntu and used it exclusively for everyday stuff, it is way more secure, and since several of the programs I use are Windows only I had my computer set up for dual boot into both OS's. But Ubuntu changed their installation, if I remember correctly they quit using grub during installation, making dual boot installation confusing, for me, on my new laptop. So now, I would love to put Ubuntu on my laptop but want to keep Windows 7, but I'm not sure how to do it. I've tried before and ended up installing over Windows 7 and had to reinstall 7.

  12. #10
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    IMO....well written article that avoids the typical fanboy bias.

    However, having installed Ubuntu in the past and not liked it, it's not a viable option for me at this time.
    I do like the idea of Linux Live CDs to a great degree as alternatives to installed Linux distros.
    This post was written on an old home built computer situated in my living room ,with Puppy Linux as it's OS and Firefox 37.0.1 as it's browser.
    I didn't feel like spending hard earned money on a new device in order to maintain reasonable security and the age and specs of this computer just aren't up to functioning well with a current MS Windows operating system.

    I'm a member here to learn how to use my computer advantageously. When a distro of Linux can run concurrently on a MS Windows machine, as a virtual OS......I have an advantage of running the 'best of both worlds' together at the same time on my office computer.


    Hopefully, there will be an article on Linux Live CDs in the near future for those that want to revive old hardware.

  13. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by daenas View Post
    I love Ubuntu and used it exclusively for everyday stuff, it is way more secure, and since several of the programs I use are Windows only I had my computer set up for dual boot into both OS's. But Ubuntu changed their installation, if I remember correctly they quit using grub during installation, making dual boot installation confusing, for me, on my new laptop. So now, I would love to put Ubuntu on my laptop but want to keep Windows 7, but I'm not sure how to do it. I've tried before and ended up installing over Windows 7 and had to reinstall 7.
    I would instal Ubuntu as a virtual OS and keep Win 7 as the boot OS.
    I've done this in the past with Ubuntu and Mint. I preferred Mint and deleted Ubuntu.
    Advantages to virtual......Both OSs can work concurrently. no conflict with boot loaders, backing up the virtual install is as simple as copying the folder the virtual OS resides in.

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  15. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclops View Post
    I subscribe to Windows Secrets to get information on Microsoft Windows, not how to install and use other operating systems. I am not partisan and use other operating systems apart from Windows, but I find it objectionable that Windows Secrets is being used to proselytize other operating systems.

    If I wanted to get info on Ubuntu or Linux, then I'd subscribe to the appropriate newsletter and forums. There are plenty of them out there.

    If you continue in this vein I'll simply cancel my subscription and walk away.

    Just pointing out that the article did mention installing a Linux distro as a virtual OS that can be used along side a running MS Windows installation.
    As such, Linux becomes essentially likened to an application that could be useful to some members.

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    As a long time dabbler in Linux (~1996), I found your article on the Ubuntu installation both interesting and well done. Thanks.

    As you noted, Ubuntu, which was a favorite for many years, now has the Unity interface, which is, indeed, similar in many ways to the often bashed Windows 8 metro stuff.

    It's the reason I looked for an alternative and found Linux Mint, which defaults to a much more familiar desktop, very much like Windows 7, in fact. So if anyone's interested in trying Linux and would prefer not to try to learn the odd Unity desktop, try Linux Mint. Of course, one of the features of Linux is you can load any of the very many desktop managers, including Mint's "Cinnamon" right on Ubuntu, but why go through that when they're both based on the debian distributions anyway? Enjoy!

    I am shocked, however, at the narrow mindedness of a couple of folks who threaten to abandon an excellent source of computer information over ONE article describing something other than Windows. While I enjoy several computer related email list mailings, I don't complain if one isn't perfect for my interests, I just don't read it! Frankly, if they were my employee and had this frame of mind, I'd NOT want them to remain as an employee. I'd have to say most larger companies already have a mix of OS in their environment and even if not supporting non-Windows systems, it's a good idea to know what else is going on in the world (meaning the business). Even though, before retirement, I was in a shop that was mainly Windows and I made my living supporting it, I often used Linux to solve a problem whether related to Windows or some other system/network problem, and our shop had all sorts of OSs there, from VAXs to Suns and some Linux boxes as well.

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  19. #14
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    Glad to get info on using Linux too as a secondary OS on my system. It is beneficial for those using older versions of WINDOWS (ie. XP) yet still want to use the internet safely. Additionally, we need to prepare Windows users (and keep them appraised to new technology) as "time may come when Windows is no longer a good OS"; competition vs. MS is good too.

    My main concern, however, is that any articles on Linux should also explain and/or give links as how to install/use the Linux Mint version (as this is also very popular); the various approaches could use guidance. Other versions also exist and guidance as where to go for good install info/intro use would be helpful.

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  21. #15
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    Linux (Ubuntu): Timely and good advice - Please Continue with More Articles

    Don't listen to the nonsense about not doing articles on Linux/Ubuntu! Microsoft created a very poor product called Surface RT, which I own and hate. It is not useable for many reasons and their $900 million write-off supports my conclusions. Next, Windows 8 was a complete debacle. It's obvious that Mr. Gates was the whole company, but he went off the deep end with draconian business practices which resulted in anti-trust lawsuits by the government. OK, so nothing is perfect, but the continued lack of security, even the government can't keep the White House computer from being hacked, is a concern to me because it's just a matter of time till the exponentially growing ID theft and hacking catches up with the general public. More than likely your personal data including SSN are in files on the black market right now and will be abused in the future.

    I have 11 computers ranging from old to the newest and fastest. I hate the Microsoft Account because it is only a matter of time until Microsoft gets hacked. I set up my computers to do different tasks, financial, email, RC simulaltion, video editing, Internet. Windows provides lots of tools and functionality thru RDC, Home Group, etc, but security and reliability have made it more important to keep systems isolated on the LAN and from the Internet. If security does not improve, I will not trust Microsoft to keep Microsoft Account safe and my current option is to switch to Linux, specifically Ubuntu or another distribution if it is more secure. Security is far more important than anyone thinks and if not addressed you will see total chaos in our future infrastructure. Imagine if TV, power grid, public transportation, medical records, financial companies, and energy systems all get compromised or destroyed. If politics, greed, and stupidity continue to dominate rational thinking, the future will be painful. If big corporations continue to elect our representatives and their only priority is rules to benefit the rich and powerful, then we are destined to a rude awakening.
    Last edited by steve1916; 2015-04-09 at 12:44. Reason: typo

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