Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Cloud storage

  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Cloud storage

    I've looked at the various "Carbonite" type off site backups.
    I have a Windows Home Server and want to have an off site backup.

    I have about 3TB to back up - would Amazon S3 or Google backup be worth considering? I would do a full back up and then an incremental back up daily.

  2. #2
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    926
    Thanks
    554
    Thanked 137 Times in 128 Posts
    uh, that is A LOT to try and backup on the cloud, expensive too.

    http://hardwareguys2.com/cgi-bin/iko...;t=10;hl=cloud

  3. #3
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Check out https://www.amazon.com/clouddrive/unlimited

    $60.00/year for unlimited storage...

    tom

  4. #4
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,191
    Thanks
    48
    Thanked 985 Times in 915 Posts
    Moving that amount of data into the cloud will take plenty of time and may be a pain to recover. If you can create a recovery image that doesn't contain the data you will be able to get the machine going and can then let the recovery take it's time.

    cheers, Paul

  5. #5
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    57
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 12 Times in 9 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by ZipZap View Post
    I've looked at the various "Carbonite" type off site backups.
    I have a Windows Home Server and want to have an off site backup.

    I have about 3TB to back up - would Amazon S3 or Google backup be worth considering? I would do a full back up and then an incremental back up daily.
    It'll depend a lot on the available budget and network bandwidth (for the initial full backup and size of the incremental backup sets).

    For storage cost, the biggest difference between Amazon S3 and Google Drive is that Amazon charges for transfers (up/down) and directory listings so there's no fixed monthly pricing. A quick comparison:
    Google Drive
    Capacity: 10 TB
    Storage Type: n/a
    Monthly Cost: $99.99
    Notes: Next lowest tier is 1 TB.

    Amazon S3

    Capacity: 3 TB
    Storage Type: Glacier Storage
    Monthly Cost: $30.00
    Notes: "Glacier Storage" is the least expensive plan, trading slow access to files for data recovery in exchange for a flat rate storage cost. Monthly cost doesn't include access fees.

    Amazon S3
    Capacity: 3 TB
    Storage Type: Reduced Redundancy Storage (RRS)
    Monthly Cost: $71.20
    Notes: Monthly cost doesn't include access fees.


    TomJ's suggestion of Amazon's other cloud storage service called Cloud Drive (https://www.amazon.com/clouddrive/unlimited) for $59.99/year is a good one. It's much more cost effective than both S3 and Google Drive because there are no storage tiers and access fees. The downside is that the overall reviews are mediocre because the backup client is barebones, especially compared to the competition.

    Also for $59.99/year, is CrashPlan (https://crashplan.com/). It covers unlimited storage for 1 computer including external drives. The backup client is very nice and it uses deduplication (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_deduplication) and compression to reduce storage requirements and network bandwidth.

    Uploading 3 TB of data could take several months. For home Internet connections, upload speeds are often much slower than download speeds. It's also a good idea to check on any data caps from your ISP. For example, AT&T has a 250 GB/month data cap (going over it could result in a notice and account cancellation). Amazon and Google don't offer a "seeding" service, but CrashPlan does (https://support.code42.com/CrashPlan.../Seeded_Backup). For a one-time fee of $124.99, it's not cheap, but it would reduce the initial backup by at least 1 TB (due to deduplication and compression, it might actually hold more than 2 TB of data).

    Chung

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •