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  1. #1
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    How to tell if all hardware will work properly with Win7 64-bit mode?

    Everything works well now with Windows 7 32 bit. I'll be upgrading to 64 bit in a few days, but first I have to know that all my hardware fully supports and will work properly with the new OS. How can I confirm that?

    TIA
    Last edited by rfe777; 2015-04-19 at 16:31.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    RFE,

    Run the Win 7 Upgrade Adviser. HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

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  3. #3
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    It's my experience running 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8/8.1 and Windows 10TP that devices require 64-bit drivers. You might be able to get Microsoft's Compatibility check to work but it basically for checking older versions of Windows. I've found it more reliable to just go to the device manufacturer's site for each device and get the 64-bit drivers. The compatibility check may require doing the same thing to get the drivers. Sometimes the Windows Update drivers will work but sometimes they can be problematic.

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    no no,

    What I meant is how can I know BEFORE I update that my hardware is compatible at all with Windows 7 64 bit? that it's not an older model or something which is not compatible?

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    The Compatibility check IS for testing before doing the upgrade, you'll need to be connected to the Internet when running it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Berton View Post
    The Compatibility check IS for testing before doing the upgrade, you'll need to be connected to the Internet when running it.
    It appears like it doesn't have a few of the hardware that I have on my PC.

    I want to know if my motherboard, processor, graphics card and sound card (external) are compatible with Windows 7 64 bit.

  7. #7
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    For the External/Add-in cards check with the manufacturer if the Compatibility check doesn't work. The motherboard and CPU nearly always work if you have at least 2GB RAM [more is better] and the CPU is at least 1GHz speed. Again Faster is better. Check what the board supports for RAM, I use www.crucial.com.

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    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfe777 View Post
    ...I want to know if my motherboard, processor, graphics card and sound card (external) are compatible with Windows 7 64 bit.
    Look up your motherboard's model number on the manufacturer's support website. You should have to choose 64bit or 32bit before accessing the lists of available drivers.

    You say you are running Win7 32bit; the same hardware should work as well, or better, with 64bit.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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  9. #9
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    Sources told me: No single consultation or a single test of a desktop or of a laptop generates a message of "sure thing" going from 32bit to 64bit for all pieces of hardware, internal and external. Make sure you have a resstorable image of your OS partition or hard-drive before beginning to commence getting started on making the conversion from 32bit to 64bit.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Look up your motherboard's model number on the manufacturer's support website. You should have to choose 64bit or 32bit before accessing the lists of available drivers. You say you are running Win7 32bit; the same hardware should work as well, or better, with 64bit.
    It looks like there are a lot of drivers for my motherboard for Windows 7 64 bit: http://www.gigabyte.com/products/pro...id=3771#driver Do I need to update them ALL? And, would you recommend to flash the BIOS? I've heard it's not healthy...

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    If you load 64 bit Windows you need 64 bit drivers, that's the way it works. Download all the drivers to your hard disk and to an external store, USB stick etc. Then they are available for the upgrade.
    Note: the hard disk controller drivers need to be unpacked to an external source so Windows can pick them up during installation.
    Note 2: IMO you should re-load from scratch if going from 32 bit to 64 bit.

    Flash the BIOS is you have a problem that needs fixing, otherwise leave it alone.

    cheers, Paul

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    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    We can only guess because you've only listed 1 item of your hardware

    If you are using an Ivybridge CPU in that 'board, I suggest you update the BIOS to F6, the last 3 updates were specific to that CPU family, F7 being for Gigabyte's 'utility' software on that CPU family. (Frankly, I'd advise steering clear of any utility software, especially those that load drivers on boot).

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    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfe777 View Post
    ...would you recommend to flash the BIOS? I've heard it's not healthy...
    Flashing the BIOS is generally not recommended unless there is a particular reason for doing so, e.g.: BIOS seriously out-of-date, upgrade needed to support later developments, etc. I have upgraded the BIOS on many (hundreds) of customers' computers without any failures. BUT be very sure to follow the upgrade instructions provided on the motherboard manufacturer's website exactly (no shortcuts).

    From the link in your #10 post http://www.gigabyte.com/products/pro...id=3771#driver
    GA-H67M-D2-B3 (rev. 1.1)
    Intel H67 Chipset

    Drivers for Win7 64bit

    Audio
    Realtek Function driver for Realtek Azalia audio chip (Including Microsoft UAA Driver in English edition) - too old, get the latest Realtek HD Audio driver (R2.75) from http://www.realtek.com.tw/downloads/...&GetDown=false

    Chipset
    Intel INF installation - download the latest Intel chipset driver installer from https://downloadcenter.intel.com/dow...pdate-Utility- (File name: SetupChipset.exe) - install this before any other drivers.
    Intel Management Engine Interface - the version on the Gigabyte website should be OK for your system.

    LAN (Local Area Network, AKA "ethernet")
    Realtek LAN Driver - the version on the Gigabyte website is up-to-date so should be OK for your system.
    Realtek Ethernet Diagnostic Utility - not necessary.

    SATA RAID/AHCI
    Intel SATA Preinstall driver - only needed if you cannot access the HDD after booting from Win7 installation DVD (unlikely).
    Intel® Rapid Storage Technology - download/install v12.8.0.1016 from the Gigabyte support website.

    VGA
    Intel VGA Driver (for Ivy Bridge CPU) v15.33.8.3345
    Intel VGA Driver (for Sandy Bridge CPU) v15.28.20.3347
    As satrow says in his #12 post if you have the "Ivy Bridge CPU" you should upgrade your BIOS to at least the F6 version; otherwise both these VGA drivers are recent enough.

    You could run "CPU-Z" to identify which CPU you have, see http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html but watch out for pre-selected unwanted "extras". Otherwise open your case, remove the cooler from your CPU, wipe off any thermal grease, and google the CPU's model number (be sure to re-apply thermal grease during re-assembly).
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    I'm going to suggest that the impulse behind "...first I have to know..." may be misplaced.

    Most professional computer techs don't really bother much with the Upgrade Advisors. RetiredGeek is correct, if you insist upon prior knowledge, then that's the gold standard. However why bother? These tools tend to produce a lot of output to look at and it's not always easy to interpret (disclaimer, I've not used the Upgrade Advisor myself. Maybe it's the greatest thing since sliced bread).

    In order to properly protect yourself, you must, repeat must, have at least one fresh, full backup prior to upgrading. And that's regardless of whether you run the Upgrade Advisor or not. Therefore this implies that running the Upgrade Advisor is optional.

    If the upgrade doesn't work, you are going to do one of 2 things:

    1). Restore from backup;
    2). Upgrade your way out of any problems (hardware, software, at this level the concept is the same).

    You see, you didn't say why you are upgrading, only that you are going to do so. That implies that, despite the comment that "Everything works well now...", for some reason you need 64-bit support. And without that requirement this upgrade is pretty minor, functionally speaking. You either must have 64-bit or why bother?

    Windows 7 is 5 years old now. It's mature. Most people would create the safety net of the backup (make 2 if you're paranoid), then give it a try. 64-bit is likewise mature, with the earliest hardware and software support going all the way back to the late 1990's (when it most definitely was not ready for consumer adoption).

    So what if we were talking about Windows 10 instead? Then most people would create a specific test system, one that they don't depend upon for day-to-day productivity. Whether that's on a dedicated PC, or a virtual machine, there are several ways to accomplish that. So while I'm loathe to actually speak against the Upgrade Advisors, most of the time it's difficult to justify spending a lot of time on them.

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by BHarder View Post
    I'm going to suggest that the impulse behind "...first I have to know..." may be misplaced.

    Most professional computer techs don't really bother much with the Upgrade Advisors. RetiredGeek is correct, if you insist upon prior knowledge, then that's the gold standard. However why bother? These tools tend to produce a lot of output to look at and it's not always easy to interpret (disclaimer, I've not used the Upgrade Advisor myself. Maybe it's the greatest thing since sliced bread).

    In order to properly protect yourself, you must, repeat must, have at least one fresh, full backup prior to upgrading. And that's regardless of whether you run the Upgrade Advisor or not. Therefore this implies that running the Upgrade Advisor is optional.

    If the upgrade doesn't work, you are going to do one of 2 things:

    1). Restore from backup;
    2). Upgrade your way out of any problems (hardware, software, at this level the concept is the same).

    You see, you didn't say why you are upgrading, only that you are going to do so. That implies that, despite the comment that "Everything works well now...", for some reason you need 64-bit support. And without that requirement this upgrade is pretty minor, functionally speaking. You either must have 64-bit or why bother?

    Windows 7 is 5 years old now. It's mature. Most people would create the safety net of the backup (make 2 if you're paranoid), then give it a try. 64-bit is likewise mature, with the earliest hardware and software support going all the way back to the late 1990's (when it most definitely was not ready for consumer adoption).

    So what if we were talking about Windows 10 instead? Then most people would create a specific test system, one that they don't depend upon for day-to-day productivity. Whether that's on a dedicated PC, or a virtual machine, there are several ways to accomplish that. So while I'm loathe to actually speak against the Upgrade Advisors, most of the time it's difficult to justify spending a lot of time on them.
    One of the reasons I'm upgrading is because I'm using Photoshop quite often, and even with 16 giga RAM it doesn't work as fast and fluid as it should (takes quite a while to even load this program...). Also, there is another photo manipulation program that I want to use, which works only on 64 bit Windows. Another thing is that I have folders with a lot of files in them, with few have jpegs of all sizes and quality, and every time I open one of these folders the PC halts for a few good seconds, something that I hope will stop happening with a 64 bit system.

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