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  1. #1
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    Large new file in C:\Windows

    Last week I reinstalled Win7 onto a WD Black2 drive -- a combo of 120GB SSD and 1TB HD. The 120GB is a bit tight to fit everything I want there, but I can live with it. I had everything I needed on the SSD and still had 10GB free.

    And this morning I discovered a 100% full drive, and a 10GB file in my C:\Windows directory...

    The file is C:\Windows\{CD58E09A-E7CC-11E4-AEB1-AC7289C101D2}. I searched the Registry for matching filenames and didn't find anything.

    Any guesses 1) what this file is, 2) what created it and filled up my drive and why, and 3) if it's safe to delete it?

  2. #2
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    That naming convention is usually used for temporary installation directories, not files. Maybe the full disk caused bad things to happen.
    Delete it and see how it goes.

    I would shuffle some stuff off the SSD to get to 10% to 15% free. One hibernation file can consume 8GB without notice.

    cheers, Paul

  3. #3
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    I had 10GB free, which was 9% of the 111GB available on the drive.

    I already have a 6.2GB C:\hiberfil.sys and an 8.3GB C:\pagefile.sys (currently 8GB RAM), so they shouldn't suddenly get that much bigger.

    A thought: pagefile.sys should probably be on the SSD for best performance. But the hibernation file doesn't have to be fast. Is it possible to move it to the 1TB HD? I know how to turn it off but there doesn't seem to be any way to move it. From what I can tell, it must be on the C: drive and can't be relocated.

    The file in C:\Windows is definitely a file, not a directory. I will move it to the HD so I can recover it if necessary. Thanks!

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    On my Win7 with 8GB RAM I have 2GB on the C: drive and 12GB on D: drive, fixed max and min.

    If you have a lot of Documents, Music, Pictures, etc., you might be able to right-click the Folders and change their location to the larger drive. But do that in C:\Users and your login, not in Libraries. Right-click each Folder, Properties, Location tab.

    I usually turn off Sleep and Hibernation, tend to cause more problems than I need.

  5. #5
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    When I'm working at my home office, I never sleep or hibernate the system. It's always on, always plugged in. (Which is not optimal for Li-On battery life, I know.) But when I travel for business, which is often, I use sleep and hibernation fairly often. So I'd rather not turn it off.

    Splitting the pagefile is a possibility, but again I believe the SSD is the best place for the pagefile. I will probably boost the RAM on this box so paging is not an issue and then I can comfortably move the pagefile to the HD. (I have 8GB RAM and I frequently run out of memory. I run several large applications all the time. With 12 or 16 GB RAM, paging wouldn't be a big deal and then I could move the pagefile.)

    Compression is another possibility, but I believe compression is not a great idea on an SSD. The SSD is a lot faster than an HD so the compression overhead is more likely to be a problem. For a laptop the added CPU load can impact battery life.

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    With 12 or 16 GB RAM, paging wouldn't be a big deal and then I could move the pagefile
    The only reason I keep 2GB on the C: drive [where the OS is installed] is that some programs look for it there. Same for the Temp Folder.

  7. #7
    WS Lounge VIP Browni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by garyfritz View Post

    Compression is another possibility, but I believe compression is not a great idea on an SSD. The SSD is a lot faster than an HD so the compression overhead is more likely to be a problem. For a laptop the added CPU load can impact battery life.
    I was reading another forum about compression earlier. It is Windows 10 centric but you may find something of use.

    Link

  8. #8
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    IMO hibernation is better than sleep mode, especially while traveling. In sleep mode, the power is still on, even though down to a trickle. Hibernation means save everything "as is" and power down. Whatchathink?
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

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    With 8GB of RAM installed, your motherboard may already be maxed out.

    Crucial's scanner will tell you if you have any leeway on that http://www.crucial.com/usa/en/systemscanner

    ReadyBoost may or not help but you could try that to see if aids memory.

    http://www.howtogeek.com/123780/htg-...t-worth-using/

  10. #10
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    I use compression on certain folders on my SSDs, used carefully on a fast, modern SSD and a good CPU, it really doesn't have much, if any, of a noticeable effect on opening or loading them, even when it comes to some big games.

    Like too much benchmarking, it's not a good idea to be running tests and compressing/decompressing 34GB of game data on your System drive though, that's best left to those who have a less used, secondary (non-System) SSD.

    For longevity and long term speed, SSDs are best when they have ~25% free space, much like HDDs.

    ReadyBoost is disabled on an SSD-equipped computer, they wouldn't benefit from the faster access times that are the main speed boost.

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  12. #11
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    That is way overcrowded for running an SSD. There needs to be room for TRIM to work.

    And 110GB of stuff! Seriously? The only thing that should be on an SSD are temp files that change a lot and get read a lot and some apps (including the OS).

    Use the HDD for storing data (like video). And even install apps on it that don't need to snap right up or are infrequently used.
    Last edited by Fascist Nation; 2015-04-22 at 19:44.

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    TRIM works by clearing used clusters, not be moving anything, so you don't need that much spare space. If you are battling against a full disk all that will happen is the writes will slow down because TRIM hasn't had time to work.
    You also need some space for defrag (yes, SSDs still use defrag).

    cheers, Paul

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    Sorry guys, I got distracted and forgot to check this thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo15 View Post
    With 8GB of RAM installed, your motherboard may already be maxed out.
    No, HP sez it can go up to 16GB.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fascist Nation View Post
    And 110GB of stuff! Seriously? The only thing that should be on an SSD are temp files that change a lot and get read a lot and some apps (including the OS).
    I've cut it down to 91GB, leaving 18 GB (16%) free. I've got all my work files &etc on C: so they're included in the scheduled backups.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    You also need some space for defrag (yes, SSDs still use defrag).
    Great article on defragging SSDs:
    http://www.hanselman.com/blog/TheRea...ntYourSSD.aspx

  15. #14
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    TRIM works by clearing used clusters, not be moving anything, so you don't need that much spare space. If you are battling against a full disk all that will happen is the writes will slow down because TRIM hasn't had time to work.
    You also need some space for defrag (yes, SSDs still use defrag).
    SSD Controllers are constantly moving stuff around for wear leveling, so yes, spare space is absolutely necessary to keep up the SSD's performance.

    Solid-state revolution: in-depth on how SSDs really work
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

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