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  1. #1
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    Arrow Determining Ethernet connection speed

    Does anyone know how to determine the actual speed of the ethernet connection to my PC (Win8.1/64)? The PC network adapter (and the Cisco router) supports up to Gigabit speeds, but I believe the network is actually running at Megabit (100Mbps) speed. Nothing I can find in Windows tells me the actual speed of the connection.

    David

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    When you open Network and Sharing Center, click on Local Area Connection and that will show the speed.

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    What speed issues do you think you have? 100Mbps is fast enough for anything internet related.

    cheers, Paul

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    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    If you really, really, mean "actual speed" you would have to time the transfer of a large file, and do the maths.

    Paul T: Virgin Media in the UK are trialling fibre connections with 'up to' 300 Mbps download data rate. Already you can get 'up to' 152 Mbps almost anywhere in those areas where the VM fibre cables have been installed (most major towns).

    (I always argue that you need these fast download speeds to be able to get Windows Updates faster...)
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

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    The "other end" of the internet is unlikely to run your connection at 100Mbps, so there isn't much point in fibre at that speed, unless you are a marketing type of course.

    cheers, Paul

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    I think the OP could be confusing data transfer speeds with broadband throughput speeds.

    My previous post will show how to see the data transfer speed and http://www.speedtest.net/ will provide an Internet speed test.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    The "other end" of the internet is unlikely to run your connection at 100Mbps, so there isn't much point in fibre at that speed, unless you are a marketing type of course.

    cheers, Paul
    Unless you are transferring large amounts of data between locally networked PCs...

    Jerry

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    Thanks. Clicking on the "ethernet" text shows the speed as 1.0Gbps, which is what I was curious about. For the other posters, I was not asking about throughput - I just wanted to know if the ethernet connection was running at 100Mbps or 1000Mbps. I have described the issues I have been having in another post in the Networking area. (I had an ethernet connection to a Sun Power data logger drop out because a new Cox Cisco Router had configured it as a Gigabit connection when one of the wire pairs was defective. After that was fixed, I was curious about whether my PC - connected to another ethernet port on the Cisco box was also running at Gigabit speed. It appears it is. I had been told that my house was wired for Megabit ethernet.)

    David

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    Depending upon the quality of the router, some of the cheaper models just have one Gigabit port while others can have all four for Gigabit.

    Older wiring installations were wired with CAT5 which is 10/100 (Megabit) whereas CAT5e and greater are for 10/100/1000 (Gigabit).

    Who told you the house had been wired for Megabit ?

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    As you know, gigabit requires all 4 pairs and will work happily in short runs of older cables (20 - 30m).

    cheers, Paul

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