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  1. #1
    Star Lounger
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    Running CHKDSK on a NAS

    Given that I can connect a WD NAS disc drive directly to a RJ45 port of an independent laptop, does anyone know how to proceed from there to get Win 7 to recognize the NAS device. My daily Acronis backups are encountering I/O errors every 4 or 5 days and I suspect Chkdsk /f could resolve such problems.

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger
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    My question: does the NAS allow that type connection? I have a WDC NAS connected to my Router by a straight-through CAT5 ethernet cable. I just checked and the Tools function in the Properties of the drive does not appear on the menu bar while it does appear in Properties of a USB-connected HDD. Based on that the answer to your question is No.

    Being there is a type of computer in the NAS it could be connecting directly to a computer will require a cross-over cable, just as if connecting 2 computers together without a Router or Switch between them.

  3. #3
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    What is a WD NAS disc drive? What format is used? I never had such a device
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  4. #4
    Star Lounger
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    I have a cross-over cable somewhere, so I'll hook that up later today (PDT) to see if the NAS will "shake hands".

  5. #5
    Star Lounger
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    NAS is Network Attached Storage. It's a disk drive designed to be attached to a router, home or office, and intended to be used by any of the computers also attached to the same router. WD is Western Digital, maker of such drives. WD sometimes refers to the NAS as one's personal "Cloud". In my case, the home computers are running their backups to my NAS.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    G.B.

    WD NAS drives use the Ext4 (Linux type) file system. Chkdsk is not designed to run against this file system. Your NAS actually runs a version of Linux which does all the heavy lifting of getting & storing the files on your NAS. HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

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  7. #7
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    My WDC 1TB NAS shows as being formatted as NTFS.
    NAS.png

  8. #8
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    Windows may show it as NTFS, but that is just how the NAS software presents the disk to network devices, not the internal format used.

    cheers, Paul

  9. #9
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    Hummm. Kaspersky "Rescue" is a Lenix based app. I wonder if it has an equivalent to Chkdsk? Can't pursue the answer to that until Sunday afternoon, CA USA.

  10. #10
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    You cannot run any sort of chkdsk on the NAS because the disk(s) are controlled by the NAS software, not by the external machine connecting to the NAS.

    You can usually connect to the NAS via your browser and look at any error logs etc.
    To do this you need to know either the network name or IP of the NAS. In Berton's post (#7) you can see that his NAS is called "MYBOOKLIVE".
    Enter that name in your browser address bar.

    cheers, Paul
    Last edited by Paul T; 2015-05-09 at 07:01.

  11. #11
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Look up the model of your NAS on the WD support website. There should be software available for download that you can use to fix the problem you are having.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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  12. #12
    5 Star Lounger
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    Just in passing, many wireless routers have a USB port into which you can plug a regular USB external HDD which then functions exactly as NAS.
    In this case, though, the HDD can be unplugged and connected directly to a PC's USB port.
    If your router has such a port why not experiment with a USB HDD - if you have one - then, if that works, re-format your WD drive to NTFS ?
    I find this type of configuration far simpler and more flexible to run, manage and trouble shoot and I'm getting a transfer rate of about 140 Mbps.
    I've also experimented with a USB hub and find that I can attach several HDDs to the router's port with no difficulty.
    Last edited by MartinM; 2015-05-09 at 10:29.

  13. #13
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    I have a Seagate GoFlex Home NAS, consisting of a base with gigabit Ethernet port and a USB extension port (it can read/write a connected USB drive) and a drive cartridge. The NAS base uses Linux server software to communicate via Ethernet, and the drive cartridge contains a 3TB Seagate SATA III HDD formatted GPT/NTFS as a single partition.

    The SATA and power connectors are exposed on the bottom of the cartridge, so the drive can be connected directly to the motherboard to bypass the NAS. About a year ago I bought a second empty cartridge via Amazon and a 3TB Seagate SATA III drive on sale via another online vendor, and made myself a second cartridge. I formatted the new drive GPT/NTFS as a single partition. The NAS base "sees" them in the same way, and this allows me to swap out my drive images easily.

    Any NAS will contain standard HDD(s) within an enclosure. To gain direct access to the drive, it might be necessary to carefully open the enclosure to remove the drive and connect it directly to one's motherboard in order to perform drive maintenance.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
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