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  1. #1
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    Question Replacing old issues in Win7 with upgrade to Win10?

    I’m running 64-bit Windows 7 Home Premium, and over time have developed the following issues that I either cannot or have not fixed:
    1.System Restore has not worked for at least a year or two now.I have no idea why, but nothing I find online gives me enough confidence to attempt to repair it myself.
    2.A few weeks ago, I had an issue while using a particular installed non-MS program, and had to shut down the computer itself in an attempt to clear the issue.I apparently corrupted a specific file in the software but managed to recreate it and now that software now functions perfectly again.However, I subsequently noticed that if shut down, Windows 7 does not always want to start up again without using the installation DVD and that makes me very nervous.
    My question is this.I’m not “a techie” at this, so don’t always know what I am doing when it comes to repairing a computer, but fortunately I have a good friend who is very good at it.However, before I “call in the cavalry” (at $50 an hour), and with Windows 10 Upgrade scheduled to be released soon (next month?), am I safe in assuming that both issues at least SHOULD be eliminated and properly functioning with an upgrade to Windows 10?
    I have pretty much decided some time ago to accept MS’s offer of a free upgrade whenever it comes out, but if both issues above are functions of Windows, am I correct in thinking it would be better(and safer for an amateur) to just wait a month or two and fix both issues as part of what ought to be a routine upgrade to Windows 10?Please let me know if I am wrong (again) in my thought process here. I welcome your thoughts and/or advice.
    Last edited by decann; 2015-05-12 at 15:13.

    David E. Cann

  2. #2
    jwoods
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    There are several troubleshooting procedures and potential solutions that you could do, but if you're not comfortable doing any of them, the best solution is to hire professional help.

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    My overall question though was will the Windows 10 upgrade replace both problems, if all goes as it should? I would really prefer not trying to fix either issue if the upgrade will leave them as past history.
    Quote Originally Posted by jwoods View Post
    There are several troubleshooting procedures and potential solutions that you could do, but if you're not comfortable doing any of them, the best solution is to hire professional help.

    David E. Cann

  4. #4
    jwoods
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    There is no guarantee that an upgrade will "fix" anything.

    A clean install of Windows (which includes wiping everything off the hard drive and re-installing all your programs and files) would solve all software and Windows-related issues.

    Again, it depends on what is causing the issues...that was my point.

    I prefer to have a system in good working order before upgrading.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Start with these two Windows maintenance utilities to see if you can narrow down your issues. An upgrade works best when your foundation is solid.

    Open an elevated Command Prompt (Right-click and select Run as administrator) and type (without the quotes) "chkdsk /r" and hit Enter.

    Notice the space before the "/". You will see a notice that it can't be run, and asking if you would like to run it at the next restart. Type (without the quotes) "y" and hit Enter. Restart your PC. If chkdsk finds errors, it might take a good while to run. Don't stop it; let it run to completion. It has been known to take hours in some cases, so don't begin this until you're pretty much finished with your PC for the day.

    After you have run chkdsk /r and the PC has booted, again open an elevated Command Prompt and type (without the quotes) "sfc /scannow" and hit Enter.
    Again, notice the space before the "/". This one won't take as long to run. If it reports finding errors that it couldn't fix, run it again. It can be run several times if necessary.

    Let us know the results.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

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    bbearren, let me contact my friend here locally and see what he suggests. You are talking about an area that I am not comfortable tampering with, and I'm just afraid that I will make it worse rather than better. Thank you for the reply.
    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    Start with these two Windows maintenance utilities to see if you can narrow down your issues. An upgrade works best when your foundation is solid.

    Open an elevated Command Prompt (Right-click and select Run as administrator) and type (without the quotes) "chkdsk /r" and hit Enter.

    Notice the space before the "/". You will see a notice that it can't be run, and asking if you would like to run it at the next restart. Type (without the quotes) "y" and hit Enter. Restart your PC. If chkdsk finds errors, it might take a good while to run. Don't stop it; let it run to completion. It has been known to take hours in some cases, so don't begin this until you're pretty much finished with your PC for the day.

    After you have run chkdsk /r and the PC has booted, again open an elevated Command Prompt and type (without the quotes) "sfc /scannow" and hit Enter.
    Again, notice the space before the "/". This one won't take as long to run. If it reports finding errors that it couldn't fix, run it again. It can be run several times if necessary.

    Let us know the results.

    David E. Cann

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    It will likely fix these issues. But Win10 is not yet available.

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    decann (2015-05-12)

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    Now I have conflicting answers, and no clue which is right. I am not much of a techie, and the thought of tampering with this stuff REALLY worries me, so that is the reason I wanted to consider the upgrade to Windows 10 thinking that should resolve both issues by default. I realize Win10 is not due out until "maybe in June" (quote from MS) and should be a simpler solution but several others who replied seem disagree with you.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fascist Nation View Post
    It will likely fix these issues. But Win10 is not yet available.

    David E. Cann

  10. #9
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    We really don't know which is right - yet.

    We do know that should the upgrade process import any 'bad' settings or Registry entries, your new W10 might end up almost as bugged as your current W7 installation.

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    decann (2015-05-13)

  12. #10
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by decann View Post
    Now I have conflicting answers, and no clue which is right. I am not much of a techie, and the thought of tampering with this stuff REALLY worries me, so that is the reason I wanted to consider the upgrade to Windows 10 thinking that should resolve both issues by default.
    Upgrading over a flaky installation of Windows 7 carries different risks than fixing the flaky installation of Windows 7, but risks all the same. The two Windows tools I recommended in post #5 are arguably the safest and most reliable repair tools to use on Windows.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

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    You have already said you are unwilling to make changes or even test your current installation. Not a problem. But you either pay someone to fix it or take the chance Win10 will fix it. The rest is a waste of time. There is no debate here. Just a decision of whether you want to pay someone to fix your current install or if the OS survives let Win10 have a automated hack at it? Either way the ball is in your court.

  14. #12
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by decann View Post
    ...Now I have conflicting answers, and no clue which is right. I am not much of a techie, and the thought of tampering with this stuff REALLY worries me, so that is the reason I wanted to consider the upgrade to Windows 10 thinking that should resolve both issues by default. I realize Win10 is not due out until "maybe in June" (quote from MS) and should be a simpler solution but several others who replied seem disagree with you.
    In my view what you call "conflicting answers" should more accurately be considered alternatives rather than conflicts.

    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    ...The two Windows tools I recommended in post #5 are arguably the safest and most reliable repair tools to use on Windows.
    I have run chkdsk and sfc scans on at least hundreds (if not thousands) of customers' computers without any problem; I wholly agree with bbearren "...the safest and most reliable repair tools to use on Windows."

    It is simply good practise to at least run chkdsk and sfc scans before attempting to make such a radical change as upgrading to a new version of Windows.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
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    I'm a little late to this party, but I got to agree with the guy who recommended chkdsk /r and sfc /scannow before doing ANYTHING.

    When I was desperate....when I was barefoot and had nothing.... these guys took me in and told me, "Now, now, laddie...chkdsk /r and sfc /scannow will tell ya wot's wot." 'n rite they were!

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