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  1. #1
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    Post Installing Office 2010 on second laptop: with or without Outlook?

    My main Win 7 Pro/Office 2010 desktop has Outlook 2010 setup as POP/SMTP (with 2 gmail accounts) and all components are working fine. I now want to add Office 2010 to my HP/Win7 laptop and considering the following options

    a: Change desktop Outlook to IMAP (to supposedly allow syncing Outlook with laptop OL) and do full Office install on laptop setting up laptop OL as Imap;
    b: No changes to current POP setup and do normal install of Office 2010 on laptop and
    b1 -just not setup laptop Outlook (and just use gmail on for emails)
    b2 - Use addin I read about called Easy2Sync - http://www.easy2sync.com/en/produkte/e2s4o.php
    b3 - Find other addin ?
    c: Or, if possible install all Office 2010 components on laptop without Outlook

    It would seem using the Easy2Sync ($79) or similar addin would be the easiest though I had bad experiences trying this in the past with Office 2003.

    Any and all thoughts will be appreciated ... TGH

  2. #2
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    It is easy to do a custom install and not install Outlook. BUT, what is your objective? Do you want to be able to access your email on both devices? Changing to IMAP is not difficult if you need email on both PCs.

    Joe

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeP517 View Post
    It is easy to do a custom install and not install Outlook. BUT, what is your objective? Do you want to be able to access your email on both devices? Changing to IMAP is not difficult if you need email on both PCs.

    Joe
    Thanks for the quick response, Joe ... If changing from POP to IMAP is easier to do in Office 2010+ than it was in Office 2003, that is obviously the way to go as I would love to have Outlook functioning on both machines. I am showing my age by just remembering the 'bad experiences' in earlier versions, and a quick review of articles on POP vs IMAP that I will have to re-visit.

    And probably another basic question -- Am I correct I could go ahead and do a full install of Office 2010 on my laptop now, and just not setup the OL accounts until I make a decision on which way to go? Thanks again ... TGH

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    Yep, you can do the install. The first time your start Outlook on the notebook you will configure the email accounts. Just don't start Outlook on the notebook until you everything changed to your satisfaction on the desktop.

    On the desktop, I'd export your current POP account to an Outlook data file (another PST). Then delete the current email account. Recreate the email account as an IMAP account. Once all is working the way correctly in Outlook, open the exported Outlook data file. Drag and drop the items you need to the appropriate folders in your new account setup.

    NOTE: you may want to backup your desktop system before you start all the account manipulation. That way you have a known point to which you can return.

    Joe
    Last edited by jwitalka; 2015-05-26 at 15:28.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to JoeP517 For This Useful Post:

    TerryGH (2015-05-26)

  6. #5
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    Big time thanks, Joe -- I'll get back to you if I have any other questions.

    TGH

  7. #6
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    I have exactly the same situation as you. During the day I operate off my desktop and nights and weekends off my laptop. If you aren't switching back and forth multiple times a day my solution works very neatly. At the end of the day, just copy off your PST file and put it on the laptop. The following morning, if you have done any Outlook work during the previous evening, just move the pst file back to the desktop. Everything stays right up to date.

    I do even more than that. I also carry a set of my files around on the laptop so that I can operate on anything just as if I am in the office. I use a product called Laplink every morning and every night and it synchs all the files on both machines to the latest copy. No muss no fuss, 2 minutes and its done. Like walking around with the same computer.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by pomeranced View Post
    I have exactly the same situation as you. During the day I operate off my desktop and nights and weekends off my laptop. If you aren't switching back and forth multiple times a day my solution works very neatly. At the end of the day, just copy off your PST file and put it on the laptop. The following morning, if you have done any Outlook work during the previous evening, just move the pst file back to the desktop. Everything stays right up to date.

    I do even more than that. I also carry a set of my files around on the laptop so that I can operate on anything just as if I am in the office. I use a product called Laplink every morning and every night and it synchs all the files on both machines to the latest copy. No muss no fuss, 2 minutes and its done. Like walking around with the same computer.

    I'd be concerned about valuable pst files getting corrupted with a set up like that then having to revert to backups and hoping that re-synching emails would not lose any emails in the process. To avoid issues like that is why IMAP should be the best solution since it keeps everything in sync automatically. However, Outlook 2010 and IMAP don't work too well together in that there are lengthy pases for syncing and actions such as deleting emails which should be instantaneous can pause for 5-10 seconds as the syncing with server occurs. Windows Live Mail 2012 does it properly, apparently so does Outlook 2013. Another alternative would be using an email provider with MAPI which is native to Outlook, such as Office 365 and Outlook.com

  9. #8
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    Cavehomme: I can't argue with your commentary, but I will tell you that I have been operating this way since WinXP and now 8.1, through multiple versions of Laplink for probably close to 15 years, and I have never had a corruption problem with the PST file or any of the other files I move back and forth every day. If you basically want to have a heavy duty desktop system and a lightweight laptop and be able to seamlessly swap between the two, this is the way to go.

  10. #9
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    If you don't mind, I offer my experience. It was mostly with Outlook Express and not as frequently in Outlook but in copying the data files from one computer to another after deleting messages on one I would run the compaction feature first. The data files are allowed to grow as messages are added but do not automatically shrink back when messages are deleted, leaves 'holes' in the files. The process is similar to defragging of the HDD but the defragging doesn't change the data files so the separate compaction process has to be done. By compacting there is less chance of corruption. Compaction also reduces the risk of meeting/exceeding the limit of file size such as 2GB in Outlook Express, also makes the transfer time a bit shorter.

  11. #10
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    I have Outlook 365 installed on both my office and home machines, using POP on both. I have the Main PST file as well as 5 other files which have nested folders which I use for daily movement for organizing received and sent messages. I use Beyond Compare and a flash drive to shuttle the files between the two machines. Not only is this an offline alternative to Laplink, but provides a very recent backup to files on the flash drive. I do not have a laptop, so keeping both machines on and using Laplink would not work well for me.

    One of the drawbacks of staying with POP and synching the files, is that copying the files takes a while as the files grow in size, so I have resorted to archiving the messages on a monthly basis so the *.PST files after compression are smaller and copy quicker. The archival messages in non-open archive files also get copied to the flash drive once a month so I can pull up older messages for reference if necessary.

    At the beginning of this year, I attempted to copy the files to One Drive, but One Drive did not allow *.PST files to be copied there. I also tried copying the files to other cloud drives, but using them caused considerable delay in opening Outlook since loading the files took a while over the web.

    I also switched to IMAP for a while, but disliked some of the issues associated with this protocol.

    I am someone who likes to keep copies of email correspondence so want to store those in archival copies on my own machine. I also want to use Outlook on both office and home machines and want to be able to view recently received and sent messages on both machines. I don't like to have to move all the messages in open daily *.PST files every month to my archival files, so that my daily files can be reduced in size to more quickly copy them to the flash drive.

    Do you have suggestions for me on how to set up any version of Outlook so I don't have to sync to and from the flash drive? Should I use Outlook.com and move messages to folders in several local PST files periodically, or switch again to IMAP and move messages to folders in several local PST files periodically?

    Any suggestions would be helpful.

    Thanks,

    Peter

  12. #11
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    POP vs IMAP

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeP517 View Post
    On the desktop, I'd export your current POP account to an Outlook data file (another PST). Then delete the current email account. Recreate the email account as an IMAP account. Once all is working the way correctly in Outlook, open the exported Outlook data file. Drag and drop the items you need to the appropriate folders in your new account setup.
    Joe
    Just a comment - if I have understood correctly - while IMAP allows you to access your mail from any computer - this is only true whilst you are web connected. If you need to access mail whilst not web connected you are better off going the Laplink route or similar.

  13. #12
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    One of the secrets to my speedy transfers with Laplink is that I do not allow my PST files to grow to unmanageable size. I try to stay under 2G and my transfers are barely more than a minute each way. After an email goes from active to reference status, in my methodology, I move it out to a regular set of folders within Documents either leaving it as an email or converting it to an PDF. This is helpful because then I don't need hundreds of folders within Outlook which is unmanageable but instead have all the flexibility of organizing unlimited folders within Documents.

  14. #13
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    Outlook 2010 and your PST files:
    There is usually more than one way to get something done.
    Here is something I have been doing for quite some time.
    First, the PST files do not have to be buried somewhere in the user folder.
    I created a separated folder and named it PST, I like short names.
    I have a Windows 7 system that is my main production system.
    It has Outlook 2010 installed and set up as follows.
    Five different pop3 email accounts and in the "more options" section where you set your POP3 and SMTP ports, there are some options, there is a check box to leave a copy on the server and another to remove emails after they are so many days old. Because my main desktop is always on and I will always receive all my emails on that system, it is the only one that I set to remove old emails. I backup the PST folder daily or more often if needed, to a NAS box.
    So now when I set up Outlook on my laptop and/or a Windows 10 system I do the following.
    First copy the PST folder to the new system then open Outlook and set up my POP3 accounts.
    During the set up I select use an existing PST and not a new one.
    Set it to leave a copy on the server and don't remove after so many days.
    When I have not used a system for a period of time and want my email PST file synced I just copy the latest backup over the current ones on that system.
    We are talking about one desktop one laptop, two Windows 10 systems one MAC and an iPhone, so this works OK for me.
    If you are using iMAP keeping you emails in sync is done for you.
    However as I understand how iMAP works; the email file on the server is only removed from the server if it is deleted from both/all your systems. When you throw in more than two systems and they are not all used all the time, iMAP becomes a little questionable.

  15. #14
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    I've just gone through this and it took days to get everything right. I use a separate notebook when I travel. Installed Outlook 2010 on it since my Verizon WebMail refuses to work from Mexico, Italy, and other countries overseas. So, before I leave, I delete the PST files for my and my wife's accounts from the traveling PC. Then transfer the PST files from my home PC. Reverse the process upon return home. I have written up a procedure for this, if you are interested. The main preliminary is knowing which PST file(s) you need and where they are. Then making sure both Outlook profiles are set up the same way and the PST files are copied into the exact same locations.

  16. #15
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    Don, Thanks for your reply and yes I would read your write up, it may give me some new ideas.
    However what I'm doing now is simple. By moving the PST files to a unique folder that is located the same on all my systems, all I need is 2 bat/vbs files, one to backup and the other to update or sync my PST files. By naming my PST files with the full email address they are easy to know which is which.

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