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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    BSD and USB ports not working?

    Hi,

    Bottom line "sometimes" USB ports do not work.
    What if anything do these 3 screen captures tell you?
    Below are 3 screen captures:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger
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    The one thing I see to comment on is that when there's a message about the BIOS/Basic Input Output System using Default settings it's time to change the CMOS/Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor battery. If the battery is dying the user-settable items are lost and have to be manually set . It's usually a CR-2032 battery, can be found on many battery display racks in various stores.

    One note about USB, usually the BIOS supports USB 2.0 and earlier but USB 3.0 ports need the drivers loaded with the OS/Operating System.

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  4. #3
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    The BSOD flags a default display -related Windows driver.
    STOP 0x0000008E: KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
    Usual causes: Insufficient disk space, Device driver, Video card, BIOS, Breakpoint in startup without having a debugger attached, Hardware incompatibility, Faulty system service, 3rd party remote control, Memory
    So I'd guess that a graphics driver or graphics hardware is high on the suspect list.

    Graphics issues if there's an add-in card involved + USB problems = failing PSU is another contender.

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  6. #4
    jwoods
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    A good tool to assist in diagnosing blue screens is Nirsoft's BlueScreenView.

    It is available for both 32 and 64 bit systems.

    http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/blue_screen_view.html

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  8. #5
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    It's rather basic and inaccurate, better to follow this and attach the required zipped folder to a reply here for further analysis.

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  10. #6
    jwoods
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    Quote Originally Posted by satrow View Post
    It's rather basic and inaccurate, better to follow this and attach the required zipped folder to a reply here for further analysis.
    Can you explain what's inaccurate?

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  12. #7
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    For the majority of BSODs it's too simplistic. It is good for checking for suspect/old 3rd party drivers - if you know of a list of suspect/bad 3rd party drivers for the Windows/SP# version that's crashing.

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  14. #8
    jwoods
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    Quote Originally Posted by satrow View Post
    For the majority of BSODs it's too simplistic. It is good for checking for suspect/old 3rd party drivers - if you know of a list of suspect/bad 3rd party drivers for the Windows/SP# version that's crashing.
    You mentioned "inaccurate", so that's what I was wondering.

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  16. #9
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    Too many times it flags default Windows drivers which are almost never the cause. It might be good - fair for ~20% of BSODs, depending on your own knowledge/experience. A minidump contains only a few milliseconds worth of data, you stand a much higher chance of finding the cause with a wider range of data.

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  18. #10
    jwoods
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    Quote Originally Posted by satrow View Post
    Too many times it flags default Windows drivers which are almost never the cause. It might be good - fair for ~20% of BSODs, depending on your own knowledge/experience. A minidump contains only a few milliseconds worth of data, you stand a much higher chance of finding the cause with a wider range of data.
    Is there any documentation on how the Sysnative tool "SysnativeBSODCollectionApp" works?

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  20. #11
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    If you use it and look at the resulting data you might not need much in the way of documentation. Try this post if you want to know more about debugging crashes.

    Otherwise, ask the people that write it?

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  22. #12
    jwoods
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    Quote Originally Posted by satrow View Post
    If you use it and look at the resulting data you might not need much in the way of documentation. Try this post if you want to know more about debugging crashes.

    Otherwise, ask the people that write it?
    I've used WinDbg to debug kernel-mode and user-mode crash dumps on servers, but I wouldn't expect a home user to do it.

    The reviews I have read on BlueScreenView have been very good, and I have used it successfully in the past.

    I don't see too many blue screens any more, but if I do, I might give SysnativeBSODCollectionApp a try.

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  24. #13
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    I/we don't expect home users to use Windbg either, that's the point of asking for collection of the data and posting it for others to analyse.

    Regardless of whether you get bugchecks or not, run the app and study the data yourself. Autoruns, DriverView, HWiNFO... - there's a host of other tools you can also use alongside the data collected to to enable a better view of what happens in normal use and right through to a BSOD.

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  26. #14
    jwoods
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    Indeed a plethora of tools available, which is a blessing and a curse.

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

  28. #15
    jwoods
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    Quote Originally Posted by klxdrt View Post
    Hi,

    Bottom line "sometimes" USB ports do not work.
    What if anything do these 3 screen captures tell you?
    Below are 3 screen captures:
    You might take a look at this Microsoft article on troubleshooting the "Stop 0x0000008E" error message in Win32k.sys on a blue screen -

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/945658

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    klxdrt (2015-06-16)

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