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  1. #1
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    Living with Ultra High DPI

    I purchased a Lenovo Yoga Pro 2 with a 3200 x 1800 resolution screen. Yes, it displays gorgeous images when an application supports this high resolution, but the rest of the time, it's driving me nuts.

    Remote Desktop shows up in a Post It note sized window with microscopic text. Outlook 2013 preview panel displays HTML emails in a narrow 2" wide view, dialog boxes on closing programs shows up as postage stamp sized, the Control Panel app for the touchpad is almost unusable due to its size, etc.

    I've got Windows 8.1 set to Larger in Change the size of all Items, lowering resolution has no effect, and read about 9,000 posts on "how do I overcome my high DPI screen" everywhere.

    Is this ultrabook just a really expensive digital photo frame?

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    I've never seen a Desktop or Notebook where the Resolution couldn't be lowered. I prefer 1440x900 but anything less than 2000 would be acceptable. The width by height ratio is usually 16:9 for wide screen displays. Have you checked with Lenovo for updated drivers [spun off from IBM a few years ago]? Also, try holding down the Ctrl key and press - or + to resize the contents of a window, click in the middle of what you want to resize first to get the 'focus' in it.
    Last edited by Berton; 2015-06-23 at 10:36.

  3. #3
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    Yes, I've tried lowering the resolution, but it doesn't affect the problems I mentioned above. Lenovo's support has been less than helpful in this regard. This issue is quite common on the super high resolution tablets/Surface/Ultrabook PCs.

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    What is the name and model number of the graphics adapter? Maybe that maker has a better driver. It may be Intel but could be AMD/ATI or nVidia.

  5. #5
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    It has an Intel HD 4400 adapter. The driver's one version older than what Intel has.

    This has more to do with the really high resolution. I'm just trying to find a way to live with it.

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    I'vw got an HP Spectre 360 with a 2560 x 1440 display on a 12" screen - so much the same as you. What I've done is gone into Control Panel -> Display and lowered the "Size of all items" down one notch (there are 4 to choose from and the default was the highest). I've then gone to the individual tex size changes (same Control Panel -> Display but lower down on the screen) and set those up to suit me.

    That works for most things - there are a few apps (Adobe PSE being one example) which ignore them and have text boxes too small to read but most apps work OK.

    Outlook (the desk program) has its own text size settings, so adjust that within the program if that's what you use.

    I hope this helps a bit

    Alan

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    My usual preference when dealing with a large/hi-rez monitor is to run the monitor at the highest possible resolution. Then adjust your application or system settings to resolve individual problems as they can be identified. That way you can take advantage of the hi-rez where support exists.

    Which is basically what you're doing now.

    When you run your video system at lower than native resolution, there's an effect where some resolutions look terrible. It happens because in mapping the driver resolution to the physical screen, you get a mapping ratio that results in partial pixels. That's impossible to display so the driver either rounds up or down. Another effect is a screen that is only partly used, with black bands on 2 sides (or even all 4 sides).

    Still, I'd be tempted to experiment with lower resolutions. You can always go back if need be. Also, it won't take terribly long to try out several possible settings.

    Operating Systems still don't dynamically scale very effectively. IIRC, even OSX had to be adjusted when Apple came out with hi-rez desktop displays. It has been discussed as a possible approach to store every desktop element as a vector and only render them to the bitmapped display at the last possible moment. However that has never been implemented and it's only part of the problem anyway.

    In general. more modern OSes and applications make better use of larger and higher resolution displays. That's the other approach. Go as modern as you can. Consider upgrading to Windows 10 sooner rather than later. Also consider switching applications if they lag in large screen support.

  8. #8
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    BHarder,

    Thanks for the suggestions. Unfortunately, you're right with the comment "Operating Systems still don't dynamically scale very effectively."

    What is especially baffling is when I lower the resolution drastically, it still doesn't affect the applications mentioned (Outlook 2013, Remote Desktop). Both still appear tiny. I can use Remote Desktop Connection Manager to replace Remote Desktop.

    It's frustrating that I can't simply change a setting to allow using non-Metro applications on this thing.

  9. #9
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    BTW, here's a link to a MS article on this phenomenon: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...?wa=wsignin1.0

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    If Outlook 2013 and Remote Desktop still appear tiny, that suggests that they detected your screen resolution at install time, not at run time. Therefore even though you changed the screen resolution later, those applications don't respond to the change. They shouldn't do that... but that doesn't help you.

    What might help is to reinstall them. That's possible for Outlook, but Remote Desktop is a part of the OS. I'm not really sure what you can do there. You've mentioned using Connection Manager. Also, sometimes Microsoft will release updates to parts of the OS. If those parts are not core OS functionality (and that would definitely include RD), Microsoft won't always issue automatic updates through WUS/WSUS. That's another possibility.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mbutts View Post
    BHarder,

    Thanks for the suggestions. Unfortunately, you're right with the comment "Operating Systems still don't dynamically scale very effectively."

    What is especially baffling is when I lower the resolution drastically, it still doesn't affect the applications mentioned (Outlook 2013, Remote Desktop). Both still appear tiny. I can use Remote Desktop Connection Manager to replace Remote Desktop.

    It's frustrating that I can't simply change a setting to allow using non-Metro applications on this thing.
    Outlook 2013 has its own settings to adjust font size. Go into View - then View Settings and change the "Other Settings" which includes fonts.

    Alan

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    The effect works in the other direction too, to smaller and lower resolution screens (though lo-rez isn't usually the primary issue). When smart phones first came out (and the PDAs prior to that), they came with special versions of an operating system sized to fit the tiny screen.

    Microsoft is creating a special application format called "universal" that is supposed to scale properly across these very different screen sizes. One of the things that makes this difficult is that fingers are larger and less precise than a mouse or stylus. Another is that the interface needs to simplify as the screen gets smaller. You don't have enough room on a phone-type display for things like menu bars, toolbars, lots of status information, and so forth.

    No one has really figured out how to do this in a way that is dynamic and programmable. Microsoft says they have done so. The jury is out on this; Microsoft has made similar claims about prior systems before.

    If they succeed it will be quite a coup. The problem here is, Microsoft isn't such a dominant vendor anymore, particularly in the tablet and phone space. It may be that Microsoft achieves technical success for MS products, and the practical impact is tiny. Apple and Android could easily retain control of the smartphone marketplace.

  13. #13
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    Decent article here about this issue. Not a solution unfortunately, and it appears that Windows 10 won't bring any secret sauce to the table.

    http://www.infoworld.com/article/295...lind-spot.html

    Basically, any time you size display elements in terms of pixels (or equivalent), you create the foundations for this problem. So I'm not impressed by the new recommendation for developers to use 256 X 256 icons. It's the bitmapped icons that are the problem to begin with!

    Bitmapped display elements tie you to a relatively small set of usable display densities. 256 icons can also create the reverse problem. A fancy new app designed for hi-rez displays will look horribly large and weird on a lo-rez monitor. And yes, you can bundle several sets of icons at different resolutions. It helps but realistically it's a workaround, a bandaid to the problem.

    What's particularly aggravating is that font technologies showed the way. They have been vector based for, oh, about 25 years now. Maybe more. Why wasn't the lesson generalized??

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