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  1. #1
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    Extend C: / Drive Onto A Second Disc

    Hi, everyone. My GF is running Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit. It's on a 96GB Kingston SSD (89.6GiB after formatting). It's getting rather full after several years of use. She also has a secondary 320GB HDD for data storage. The Windows 7 "Libraries" are configured to save Documents, Downloads, Pictures, Videos, Music etc. to the secondary data drive. To be clear, she's NOT duplicating data on both drives so there's not much space to be saved or reclaimed on the SSD Windows boot drive.

    We have a spare 80GB SSD that's not in use (a classic Intel X-25). It would be very convenient to have the C:/ drive (Windows boot drive) span across both SSDs, but my understanding has always been that you simply CAN'T do that in Windows 7. However, in a recent conversation with an IT guy for a local company, he insisted there is software available to accomplish this without converting to "dynamic" discs or needing to reinstall Windows.

    GF wants only one big (bigger) partition for Windows and all installed programs & games to keep her life as simple as possible. Does anyone here know if it's actually possible to combine the two separate SSDs into one Windows C: drive?

    The easiest solution may be to buy a new 240GB SSD and clone Windows onto it. To me that's a simple and familiar procedure. But, it would certainly be convenient to employ our existing spare SSD if possible. Can it be done? Or, am i whistlin' in the wind here?

    P.S. She won't be upgrading/updating to Windows 10 because she uses Windows Media Center to record and watch TV.

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    You can make the drive appear as a folder on C:
    make a new folder on C: name it say, "test"

    Goto Diskmanager
    R click on the new Drive
    click change drive letter and path
    choose add
    choose browse and browse to the folder you created ie "test"
    (you could also create a new folder at this point if you wish instead of in step one)
    This will not work for an existing folder that is in use.

    I don't recommend trying installing software there, which likely makes this useless for you but as you did not specify just what you wanted to do I thought I would put it forward for consideration.

    edit guess I did not read the whole post, you did say what you wanted to use it for.
    Last edited by wavy; 2015-07-14 at 19:14. Reason: oops
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    and or FYI what would that software be??
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wavy View Post
    and or FYI what would that software be??
    She occasionally installs a new program or game and almost never uninstalls anything except maybe a game she didn't enjoy. So, she needs extra capacity to continue installing new stuff.

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    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Sorry marvin I didn't quote, I meant the software the tech was talking about.

    However, in a recent conversation with an IT guy for a local company, he insisted there is software available to accomplish this without converting to "dynamic" discs or needing to reinstall Windows.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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    Relying on spanned disks (software RAID) is never a good idea in the home environment - it's not great anywhere.
    Either clean up the disk to free up space or buy a new disk. Anything else is just fiddling around the edges and won't end well.
    You can use the old disk in a USB caddy as a backup device, or donate it to a friend in need.

    cheers, Paul

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    Although I generally agree with Paul T, the OP may know their capabilities and limits better than us.

    There is such a capability in Win7. There is some risk to your system; make a full backup before attempting this, even before installing that spare SSD. It should work but regrets are cheap.

    You need Disk Management. If you are not familiar, it's under:

    Start | All Programs | Administrative Tools | Computer Management | Allow Changes? | Yest | Storage | Disk Management.

    The following is directly from the online help text:

    A spanned volume is a dynamic volume that consists of disk space on more than one physical disk. If a simple volume is not a system volume or boot volume, you can extend across additional disks. If you extend a simple volume across multiple disks, it becomes a spanned volume.

    You can extend a volume only if it does not have a file system or if it is formatted using the NTFS file system. You cannot extend volumes formatted using FAT or FAT32.

    Backup Operator or Administrator is the minimum membership required to complete the actions below.


    To extend a simple or spanned volume using the Windows interface

    In Disk Management, right-click the simple or spanned volume you want to extend.

    Click Extend Volume.

    Follow the instructions on your screen.

    And therein lies the sticking point. Your C: drive is both your system and boot volume. You aren't allowed to make that a spanned volume. So close!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BHarder View Post
    Although I generally agree with Paul T, the OP may know their capabilities and limits better than us.

    There is such a capability in Win7. There is some risk to your system; make a full backup before attempting this, even before installing that spare SSD. It should work but regrets are cheap.

    You need Disk Management. If you are not familiar, it's under:

    Start | All Programs | Administrative Tools | Computer Management | Allow Changes? | Yest | Storage | Disk Management.

    The following is directly from the online help text:




    And therein lies the sticking point. Your C: drive is both your system and boot volume. You aren't allowed to make that a spanned volume. So close!
    Thanks BHarder, Paul T and wavy for your kind assistance. It's much appreciated!

    Yes, that has always been my understanding, too. We also have an add-on SATA controller card and a hard drive dock that hold two drives. Both of these components offer an option called JBOD (just a bunch of drives) which is, in effect, a spanned volume of two (or more) discs. Again, only "data" drives, not boot drives, qualify for that option.

    To maintain domestic tranquility i'm ordering one of those Mushkin ECO2 240GB SSDs for $87.99 minus 10% on a promo code from Newegg.com. Mini-tool or EaseUS can clone Win 7 onto the new SSD and i'll then have two spare SSDs which i can use with an old psu, case and RAM to build a backup PC ... just in case the GF's ol' Core2Duo decides to bite the dust.

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