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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
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    Final countdown for the release of Win10




    FIELD NOTES

    Final countdown for the release of Win10


    By Tracey Capen

    Microsoft has apparently gone quiet as it approaches the Windows 10–release deadline; the folks in Redmond are likely putting in some long hours. Still, there's much to be revealed about the new OS — not just on launch day, but over the weeks to follow.

    The full text of this column is posted at WindowsSecrets.com/field-notes/final-countdown-for-the-release-of-win10/ (opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.
    Last edited by Kathleen Atkins; 2015-07-15 at 16:28.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    Last first, let me just recommend Android to you. My first Android, a Nexus 7, is still going strong for a friend. My second and third Android, Samsung S4 and Samsung Note 10.1, are nearing two years old and I have no thought to change them.

    But on the migrating to Win10, I'm downloading 10240 now. Based on the previous three betas, I'm pretty well confident in Win10 and expect to upgrade on my primary laptop right away. Not only is the migration easy, but the software just is more intuitive than either Win7 or Win8 ever was. There's lots of new stuff to learn (Edge, Cortana, Photos, etc) and I haven't even tried it all, but the apps I do use (like Chrome) work just fine with Win10, so I'm willing to put up with some startup bumps. There are things that pre-10240 I'm still not happy with (Edge and Photos) -- still issues to resolve. But most of that will settle out in the next 10 days and just the feel and usability of Win10 over Win8.1 (or even Win7 that used to be on this old laptop I'm testing with and responding to you with) are so good that it makes no sense to me to wait.

    Am I a longtime Windows user? -- Yes, way before you started. Have I always been happy with new Windows releases -- Hell, no! (Win8 was a particular loser.) But while Win10 may not be an amaze and wow release, it looks good, it's stable and it's much more useful and usable than any previous release.
    Last edited by richlife; 2015-07-16 at 08:38.

  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    In his article Tracey said: Looking at build 101652, I think Windows 10 is shaping up well. My one standing complaint, however, is the start-menu box for Universal (Metro) apps. When open, it still takes up a good portion of the screen. Would it be that difficult to have it automatically shrink to fit the number of displayed tiles? Perhaps I'm missing something. If so, I'm sure I'll hear about it.

    My main complaint with Windows since before I can remember is its ability to remember a window has been restored DOWN but for some reason cannot remember when a window has been restored up (maximized). I know this has been an annoyance with many users but MS has never seen fit to fix it. I can deal with an oversized app menu if the restored size of a window can be remembered. If I am missing something I hope someone will point it out to me.

    Don

  4. #4
    Star Lounger
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    Tracey,
    You hit the nail on the head in the "The strange case of the reappearing iPad" part of today's article. I have an iPod Touch 4th generation (essentially an iPhone 4 without the phone) and it becomes less useful with each passing day. It has iOS 6 and can't be upgraded any further. Any software I find that I want to install requires iOS 7 or higher.

    That brings me to my perceived "beauty" of Windows 10. It is my understanding that Windows 10 is the last major update to Windows and ALL future updates to Windows will be incremental. That implies to me that PC hardware running Windows 10 will be able to take future operating system updates for a much longer time, perhaps for as long as the hardware lasts.

    The next step in my logic moves to smartphones that will be running the Windows 10 operating system. I believe they will be released in the coming months. If the same can be said for the mobile version of Windows 10 as the PC version, I would expect the obsolescence rate of the Windows 10 smartphones to be dramatically slowed down. Do you agree?
    Stu

  5. #5
    Star Lounger Techie's Avatar
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    I have an IPad 1 as well. Apple is such a funny company - they seem to be the only company that actually makes a device with a battery that lasts forever, but then stops supporting the device for software updates. It's backwards.

    I am very frustrated that my Safari browser often crashes on the IPad 1, perhaps I will find another browser...
    Peter
    Support for a large nonprofit
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  6. #6
    New Lounger
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    Would like to see an article on replacing Windows Media Center as it goes away with Windows 10. Something as simple as WMC.

  7. #7
    4 Star Lounger
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    How do you get away with referring to your wife as "spousal unit"? Maybe you should upgrade your reference to something more personal and human like she-who-must-be-obeyed ....

  8. #8
    Lounger
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    Win 10 UI is dreadful. I can't think of any reason for anyone to upgrade until it is fixed.

  9. #9
    Ken Kashmarek
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    It is my observation that the Win10 UI is a step backwards. I often get the feeling that it is a deliberate dumbing down of techies.

    In particular, my Win10 (TH1 10340) is on a 64-bit workstation that is equipped with a wireless interface on the motherboard. Up to this point, I had not activated it, relying on the cable connected to my LAN for access. However, it trying to set up the wireless access, it turned into a trial beyond imagination.

    All of my older systems had wireless configuration tools. However, the setup on Windows 7 worked very well without any vendor provided tools. I could always find the wireless arrangement in the network, view it, configure it, easily enable/disable the device, and make changes to its configuration (under manage wireless connections).

    With Win8.1Pro, lots of those useful Win7 tools went into the bit bucket, or were moved off to locations not easily discernible by even knowledgeable users. For example, full network map is not available under 8.1Pro. Manage wireless connections is no longer there. And, other operations with regard to wireless connection are not intuitive. For example, a connection that can't be made then becomes a "hidden" connection that can't easily be accessed for investigation or correction (if correction is needed). One must redefine a "new" connection that has the same name as the "hidden" connection, at the end of which you are told the "new" connection already exists, at which point you are allowed to access it in your attempt to view and/or connect. What a charade!

    Win10 makes this even worse, taking the access away from the Network Properties, and "hiding" the configuration in the Settings area. Well, not really "hidden" but not intuitively obvious, and also difficult to use.

    After much trial an error, I accidently double-click on the connection name in the settings panel, lo and behold, the connect dialog was presented. That was a learning experience for me but a sad exhibition of the poor Win10 UI. Now, one must double-click almost everything to find out what is behind it (the name has no indication that it is a clickable item in the list presented).

    Now, I am sure to be chided for "lacking" insight into such things. When Windows 3.1, Windows For Workgroups, and Windows 95 were new, lots of changes were necessary to improve those products. Big among those users were sharp techies that knew what they were doing (or attempting to do; Microsoft listened to them).

    What came with Win8 and now Win10 seems mostly unnecessary. Things can be improved without making them difficult. I fear that Win10 on PCs will not fly very well. The PC does not need a qausi-"smart phone" interface. It now seems like Microsoft is working hard to kill the PC (maybe rightly so but don't take me out with it).

  10. #10
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    In Windows 10, build numbers mean a alot. Build #101652(Tracey) and 10340 here in the comments I have never heard of. I am hoping that the numbers are typos because I have run ever Build Gab Aul and team have officially and publicly release and none had those numbers.

    I know there were even more MS Internal Builds and some of them were leak, but I wouldn't think it is appropriate to discuss them here?

    Just say'n,

    Crysta

  11. #11
    New Lounger
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    Unhappy Back ups and Recovery Partitions

    Quote Originally Posted by Kathleen Atkins View Post



    FIELD NOTES

    Final countdown for the release of Win10


    By Tracey Capen

    Microsoft has apparently gone quiet as it approaches the Windows 10–release deadline; the folks in Redmond are likely putting in some long hours. Still, there's much to be revealed about the new OS — not just on launch day, but over the weeks to follow.

    The full text of this column is posted at WindowsSecrets.com/field-notes/final-countdown-for-the-release-of-win10/ (opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.
    Hi

    I have a Dell and having religiously followed Fred's advice to build a back up decided to test it after upgrading from Win 8.0 to 8.1. only to discover that the recovery partition remains at Win 8.0 and that nothing would work without the serial number of the original installation buried in the bowels of EUFI. I have never managed to resolve this concern (that a full recover will drop me back to Win 8.0) and the one time I did need it Dell Techhelp did exactly that and I had to re-update to 8.1 (which left me with strange blips in my admin rights).
    Now with the advent of Win 10 the situation looks set to get worse. Even if I buy a Win 10 recovery disc; how do I avoid the need for the serial number buried in the machine to make it all work?

    Ciao
    martinloat
    When arguing with an idiot make sure they are not doing the same.

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