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  1. #1
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    Does Win7 support UEFI?

    I've been told by my video card's company (Sapphiretech) that Win7 (I'm running Win7 home sp1 64-bit) does not support UEFI. Their video card (R9 380) which I just bought has the option of running in either legacy bios or UEFI bios. My system which has an Asus P8Z77-V LX moboard which only runs in UEFI mode (as far as I can tell). The Sapphiretech techie says that their video card won't run in UEFI mode on a system with Win7...but it does anyway. Am I confusing moboard UEFI with video card UEFI (what's the real difference)? Win7 obviously supports moboard UEFI. Should it support video card UEFI?

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    My 2 Desktops, one Win7 and the other Win8.1 do not use UEFI and the Sapphire ATI Radeon cards on them work fine, never was given the same option you saw.

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    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
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    Win7 obviously supports moboard UEFI. Should it support video card UEFI?
    If I understand your question correctly:
    yes it should. The Asus P8Z77-V LX supports UEFI for win 7 64 bit. Here is the overview page for your MoBo, https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards...V_LX/overview/

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    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curious142 View Post
    I've been told by my video card's company (Sapphiretech) that Win7 (I'm running Win7 home sp1 64-bit) does not support UEFI. Their video card (R9 380) which I just bought has the option of running in either legacy bios or UEFI bios. My system which has an Asus P8Z77-V LX moboard which only runs in UEFI mode (as far as I can tell). The Sapphiretech techie says that their video card won't run in UEFI mode on a system with Win7..Am I confusing moboard UEFI with video card UEFI (what's the real difference)? Win7 obviously supports moboard UEFI. Should it support video card UEFI?
    Windows 7 64 bit does support UEFI, that's how I boot.
    Their video card (R9 380) which I just bought has the option of running in either legacy bios or UEFI bios.
    I would think they are talking about the option ROM being loaded from the card.
    .but it does anyway. Am I confusing moboard UEFI with video card UEFI
    Maybe its the tech that is confused.
    .but it does anyway.
    well thats good
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    Windows 7 does not support EUFI. Windows 7 does not know what EUFI is. If you go into the EUFI setup and either turn off secure boot, or go into Legacy mode, then Windows 7 will boot anyway.

    Not all computers with EUFI have a Legacy mode, or a setting to turn off secure boot, in which case, you can't install Windows 7.

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    Prescott, I don't think that's correct. UEFI is a motherboard thing that defines how the boot information is stored and accessed. Windows doesn't actually need anything special for UEFI to work.
    https://www.happyassassin.net/2014/0...lly-work-then/

    cheers, Paul

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    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prescott View Post
    Windows 7 does not support EUFI. Windows 7 does not know what EUFI is. If you go into the EUFI setup and either turn off secure boot, or go into Legacy mode, then Windows 7 will boot anyway.

    Not all computers with EUFI have a Legacy mode, or a setting to turn off secure boot, in which case, you can't install Windows 7.
    Windows 7 x64 (64bit) does indeed support UEFI, and installs transparently; Windows 7 x86 (32bit) does not.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

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    Unleash Windows

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    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    Prescott, I don't think that's correct. UEFI is a motherboard thing that defines how the boot information is stored and accessed. Windows doesn't actually need anything special for UEFI to work.
    https://www.happyassassin.net/2014/0...lly-work-then/

    cheers, Paul
    I do think it needs that EFI partition.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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    Nope, it'll boot MBR happily.

    cheers, Paul

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    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    Nope, it'll boot MBR happily.

    cheers, Paul
    Maybe I need to reread that link. I think I originally posted it.
    I am still thinking to boot 100% UEFI on a GPT disk it needs that EFI partition. But then again it is the boot files and I guess the UEFI can get pointed else where.

    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    Nope, it'll boot MBR happily.

    cheers, Paul
    Maybe I need to reread that link. I think I originally posted it.
    I am still thinking to boot 100% UEFI on a GPT disk it needs that EFI partition. But then again it is the boot files and I guess the UEFI can get pointed else where.


    From that link. Which I think has given me a head ache.
    To be bootable in UEFI native mode, your OS installation medium must obviously actually comply with all this stuff we’ve just described: it’s got to have a GPT partition table, and an EFI system partition with a bootloader in the correct ‘fallback’ path – \EFI\BOOT\BOOTx64.EFI
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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    For a true UEFI boot you need those things, but the mobo will still boot from MBR, in which case Windows is not involved in UEFI.

    cheers, Paul

  14. #13
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Here be dragons.

    There seems to be confusion between UEFI and GPT.

    So far as I can tell to this point in time there is no direct connection between the two; UEFI is about the motherboard firmware, whereas GPT is about the partitioning scheme used for the management of data-storage on drives.

    But Windows has a limitation of 2TB when it comes to MBR partitions, hence the newer GPT scheme which apparently allows Windows to access much larger partitions.

    So far I have only had to work with HDDs larger than 2TB twice. The first case involved a NAS which had a Linux-based server managing data-access.

    In the second case I had to fit a 3TB HDD to the Win7 PC. It was not possible to set up a 3TB MBR partition under Win7, but I was able to set up a 3TB GPT partition and Win7 seemed happy with that.
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    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Here be dragons.

    There seems to be confusion between UEFI and GPT.

    So far as I can tell to this point in time there is no direct connection between the two; UEFI is about the motherboard firmware, whereas GPT is about the partitioning scheme used for the management of data-storage on drives.

    [
    Yes I am in agreement!


    https://www.happyassassin.net/2014/0...lly-work-then/

    The GPT (GUID partition table) format

    The GUID Partition Table format is very much tied in with the UEFI specification, and again, this isn’t something particularly complex or in need of much explanation, it’s just a good bit of groundwork the spec provides. GPT is just a standard for doing partition tables – the information at the start of a disk that defines what partitions that disk contains. It’s a better standard for doing this than MBR/’MS-DOS’ partition tables were in many ways, and the UEFI spec requires that UEFI-compliant firmwares be capable of interpreting GPT (it also requires them to be capable of interpreting MBR, for backwards compatibility). All of this is useful groundwork: what’s going on here is the spec is establishing certain capabilities that everything above the firmware layer can rely on the firmware to have.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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