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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
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    How To Get Faster Backup

    I decided to do a full backup of my Lenovo desktop yesterday, since I finally got my Toshiba USB 3 external hard drives working (had to get a powered USB 3 hub for them). Had 439 GB to backup, and the Lenovo backup program took 16 hours to complete--and I did nothing else while the backup program was running. If I can fit another SATA hard drive into the PC (it's a small form factor case), how much time could I chop off the backup run? And that would be faster than using a NAS unit, right?

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    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    JJ,

    It will definitely speed up! However, there are too many variables that are unknown to come up with reliable figures.

    Sata Version, Processor Speed, Memory Speed, Disk Rotation & Write Speed & cache size, etc.
    Not to mention the efficiency of your backup program. HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

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  3. #3
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    And are the USB 3 drives in USB ports. USB 3 is very fast compared to 2 , but I prefer an external eSATA enclosure for this.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  4. #4
    2 Star Lounger
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    An internal drive will always be faster than an external drive or NAS. At least one saving grace is that you can do mostly incremental backups once that first backup is finished.

    Also, others here can tell you better than I can, but an image backup might be much faster than the file by file backup I'm guessing you're doing.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    If you are using an imaging based backup solution and the data you are backing up is associated with the
    primary OS drive, then it'll take a very long time and increase the probability of an error croping up.
    Image your OS only, not the 400+GB worth of data aassociated with it.
    Imaging is best used to recover an operating system that is NOT encumbered by a vast data store.
    This way it can be done quickly, within 20-40 minutes.

    The solution is to install another large capacity internal drive, then organize and
    move all the important non operating system data to it.
    That data can then be backed up a second time to external USB drive in a more leisurely fashion.

    Otherwise, you had better get used to the 10+ hours it's going to take.

    The second choice would be to use an external drive with an eSATA port if available, but
    disassociating your most important data from the the operating system is a must.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
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  6. #6
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    What Clint Said and external eSATA IS the way to go. You can physically separate the backup from the computer.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  7. #7
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    Having had my OS on C, my data on D has served me very well over the years! Especially since I have had to restore OS several times over those years.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  8. #8
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    439 GB is a lot. Have you considered partial backups and full backups?

    On my home Win 8.1 Update laptop I only have 32 GB on my data drive F:. I only backup F:. I have mainly small files, so the 32 GB contains 57,322 files and 5,583 folders.

    As for C:, I have 292,981 files and 62,887 folders. I don't understand the dynamics of C:, so I just think good thoughts.

    Still, I do partial backups.

    Instead of one backup strategy, I have several. I have separate backups, mainly groups of folders with Copy-n-Paste to the backup media. There are three main groups of folders - dynamic, static, and archive. The dynamic backups are the most frequent, and the archive backups are less frequent.

    A typical backup of my dynamic folders, 3.88 GB, includes 4,574 files in 562 folders.

    Everything depends on the dynamics of your file activity.

    One thing seems to help with the archive backup times. Before I archive a folder, archives are always folders of files, I restructure and/or rename the folders and files, create a table of contents, then zip the entire kit and kaboodle. I find Copy-n-Paste of zips faster than individual files.

    Because of the folder groupings by the dynamics of the file activity within, I don't back up everything every time. And I do have rotation schemes for each backup type.

    I admit it's more self-monitoring, but I am trying to limit the growth of my dynamic files, and keep my statics and archives easy-to-use.

    Good luck.

  9. #9
    4 Star Lounger
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    An internal drive is basically always faster than an external drive. You have to have a really unusual setup to violate this expectation.

    The reasons are simple:

    - SATA, (or FC, or PATA, or SCSI, or iSCSI, or...) is always faster than USB 2/3. I'm not sure about eSATA which is the external form of SATA, but again I'd expect it to easily outperform USB. Internal interconnects are always faster than external ones as a rule;
    - External drives are built for price, flexibility and shock resistance, mainly. They usually spin at 5400 RPM or slower. The data interconnect is routinely a bottleneck so there's no incentive to beef up performance;
    - Internal drives are built for price, capacity and performance. They usually spin at 5400 RPM or higher, with 7200 RPM being most common. The data interconnects are rarely bottlenecks except in the case of SDD (flash);

    However using internal drives for backup has one big disadvantage. If your computer burns (or is stolen, or driven over by a cement truck), your backups die with the computer.

    My take on it is this. Most people either don't do backups or they do them too infrequently. It's not an either/or choice, internal versus external backup targets. Do both!

    Make backups to an internal target frequently, every day if you can. Schedule them if at all possible. Then, once a month or something, do backups to an external device. Keep the external device away from the computer, in a fire safe if you can manage that. The external backups are slower and less convenient but you are doing them less often. You are trying to minimize your inconvenience but still with a good level of protection.

  10. #10
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BHarder View Post
    An internal drive is basically always faster than an external drive. You have to have a really unusual setup to violate this expectation.

    The reasons are simple:

    - SATA, (or FC, or PATA, or SCSI, or iSCSI, or...) is always faster than USB 2/3. I'm not sure about eSATA which is the external form of SATA, but again I'd expect it to easily outperform USB. Internal interconnects are always faster than external ones as a rule; .
    Nope, on newer computers eSATA 3 is faster than SATA 2 as fast as SATA3, and yes a fast SSD would not be the bottleneck.

    USB 3 is faster than SATA 2 again on newer computers. Older implementations may have issues.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SATA_2..._300_MB.2Fs.29

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Univer...smission_rates

    I would go w/ an eSATA3 card or USB3. BTW USB3.1 is even faster.

    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  11. #11
    4 Star Lounger
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    on newer computers eSATA 3 is faster than SATA 2
    How many computers are going to offer eSATA 3 externally and SATA 2 internally? That's a pretty strange setup you're talking about there!

    Besides, there are thousands of computers with eSATA ports that will never be used. eSATA is a specialty interface; USB has entirely succeeded in becoming the "universal" interconnect.

    And for all the benefits of USB 3/3.1, the OP's problem is performance. In that environment it behooves him to check out eSATA. USB 3+ devices often have problems with being unrecognized, or running far slower than their potential. None of which helps with the performance issue.

  12. #12
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Like I said an eSATA card would be the first choice with a good dock.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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