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  1. #1
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    Exclamation Windows Update crashes on Windows 10?

    Can someone out there please give me an honest and fair assessment of the Windows 10 crashes supposedly caused by errors in the new auto-Update in Windows 10 please? So far, I have experienced a flawless upgrade from 32-bit Windows 7 Home Premium in my Dell laptop. However, now after reading often conflicting information on crashes caused by automatic updates, I am almost afraid to turn the laptop on for fear of what could happen if it crashes.

    Additionally, my wife and I each have 64-bit desktops still running Windows 7 Home Premium because of what I am now hearing, and my concerns with the Windows Update crashes I am reading about in Windows 10. Anyone out there able to offer any frank and unbiased suggestions for an intermediate computer user who is very reluctant to introduce problems? I presume that Microsoft is working on a fix for the problem. . . .I hope!!! :-(

    David E. Cann

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    Are you talking about a theoretical possibility in the future or something that has actually happened in the last 10 days?

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    It's not theoretical, according to what I have read about it. That's why I am asking. See the following:

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonke...ss-crash-loop/

    and

    http://www.shacknews.com/article/907...omatic-updates

    David E. Cann

  4. #4
    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
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    Just to be clear, there have been bad updates in win 7 also over the past couple of years so it's not just win 10.
    There is a fix to stop the loop in the article that you posted http://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonke...ss-crash-loop/ .
    It didn't affect my computer or many others BUT there are many computer configurations that were affected.
    If you don't want win 10 because you are afraid of it, go back to win 7. No sense in living in fear of an OS.

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    I've had nary a problem and am very happy with W10, on a W7 bread and butter machine and a w8.1 laptop.

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    Lumpy95, I thank you for your reply, but it doesn't remotely answer my question. The crashes caused by Windows 10's Windows Updates are apparently real, and if you note my original query I was asking for advice about them before installing Windows 10 in two more machines. I am not "afraid" of Windows 10 as you suggested, or it would not now be installed in my laptop, but I AM AFRAID of blindly installing an operating system with potential issues without asking questions and gathering facts. I am sorry you could not answer my query, but I thank you for your reply nevertheless.
    Quote Originally Posted by lumpy95 View Post
    Just to be clear, there have been bad updates in win 7 also over the past couple of years so it's not just win 10.
    There is a fix to stop the loop in the article that you posted http://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonke...ss-crash-loop/ .
    It didn't affect my computer or many others BUT there are many computer configurations that were affected.
    If you don't want win 10 because you are afraid of it, go back to win 7. No sense in living in fear of an OS.

    David E. Cann

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    revmrf, Same here if you count only my laptop, which accepted the upgrade without a problem or any difficulty. Unfortunately, that was when I read about the issue with its Windows Upgrade that has caused crashes and now I'm trying to learn about it before upgrading two primary use desktops.

    David E. Cann

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    Quote Originally Posted by decann View Post
    . . . Unfortunately, that was when I read about the issue with its Windows Upgrade that has caused crashes and now I'm trying to learn about it before upgrading two primary use desktops.
    David, in your situation I would follow the general advice to wait another 6 months before upgrading your desktops to Windows 10. I assume they work fine now. Let Microsoft have some time to work on Windows 10 and the Win 10 updates. Then, read the news articles about any update problems going on in January, if any, and re-evaluate your decision of when the best time to upgrade may be. Remember there is no hurry. You can even wait until next July 2016 to pull the trigger.

    Another article I found today about the KB3081424 cumulative update causing reboot loops can be found here at ZDNet:

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows...or-some-users/

    This article and Gordon Kelly's article at Forbes describe how to make registry edits to provide a temporary fix to clear the reboot issue and then successfully complete the update. You are right that there is no need for you to have to play around with these potentially dangerous manual changes to Windows 10, dangerous if you make the wrong change. No doubt Microsoft is probably working on an update right now to correct this reboot issue and it will all go away in a few days.

    There is no reason for you to participate in this cutting-edge tech scene now. My advice to you is to forget about it for now and think about it again in January.
    Last edited by LarryNY; 2015-08-09 at 20:34.

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    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
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    but I AM AFRAID of blindly installing an operating system with potential issues without asking questions and gathering facts
    Sorry David, but there is no way of knowing which computer will be affected by that particular update. Hopefully MS will fix it soon and as I mentioned, the article has a temporary fix in it if you want to upgrade your other computers.
    Personally I only updated my laptop to see if I even like win 10 because it's so early in the release and I did a Clone of my HDD before even attempting to get win 10 so that I have something to go back to if there is a nasty surprise.
    There's plenty of time to do the others. It will take some time for win 10 to be more stable on more systems and I doubt that MS is going to change their update policy anytime soon. Public opinion may force it in the future if MS has many more debacles like this latest one.

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    decann (2015-08-09)

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    Quote Originally Posted by decann View Post
    . . . So far, I have experienced a flawless upgrade from 32-bit Windows 7 Home Premium in my Dell laptop. However, now after reading often conflicting information on crashes caused by automatic updates, I am almost afraid to turn the laptop on for fear of what could happen if it crashes.
    Oh, and David, I would turn the Windows 10 laptop on. If something should happen in the weeks and months ahead, remember you can always return here to the Windows Secrets Lounge on your desktop to find an answer.

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    decann (2015-08-09)

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    I will use it, but I typically do not use the laptop very much, which is the main reason I did the first install there in case something like this happened. It appears to be find SO FAR though, but I'm not going to be in a hurry upgrading the two primary use desktops any time soon.
    Quote Originally Posted by LarryNY View Post
    Oh, and David, I would turn the Windows 10 laptop on. If something should happen in the weeks and months ahead, remember you can always return here to the Windows Secrets Lounge on your desktop to find an answer.

    David E. Cann

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    LarryNY, I've put the two primary use desktops "on the back burner" for awhile until I can make an educated judgment on upgrading (or NOT) them. That is kind of my reason for posting here to see if anyone here could offer some advice. I get a distinct impression from the replies so far though that I am telling folks here something they have never heard about though insofar as the Windows Update issues are concerned. :-(
    Quote Originally Posted by LarryNY View Post
    David, in your situation I would follow the general advice to wait another 6 months before upgrading your desktops to Windows 10. I assume they work fine now. Let Microsoft have some time to work on Windows 10 and the Win 10 updates. Then, read the news articles about any update problems going on in January, if any, and re-evaluate your decision of when the best time to upgrade may be. Remember there is no hurry. You can even wait until next July 2016 to pull the trigger.

    Another article I found today about the KB3081424 cumulative update causing reboot loops can be found here at ZDNet:

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows...or-some-users/

    This article and Gordon Kelly's article at Forbes describe how to make registry edits to provide a temporary fix to clear the reboot issue and then successfully complete the update. You are right that there is no need for you to have to play around with these potentially dangerous manual changes to Windows 10, dangerous if you make the wrong change. No doubt Microsoft is probably working on an update right now to correct this reboot issue and it will all go away in a few days.

    There is no reason for you to participate in this cutting-edge tech scene now. My advice to you is to forget about it for now and think about it again in January.

    David E. Cann

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    My 2 desktops are fine now, both still running on Windows 7 Home Premium, and the laptop is working just as well after an upgrade to Windows 10 as well. After reading the article I mentioned though, I am now not in any hurry to upgrade given Microsoft's past track records with new software releases. . . .particularly new operating systems.
    Quote Originally Posted by LarryNY View Post
    David, in your situation I would follow the general advice to wait another 6 months before upgrading your desktops to Windows 10. I assume they work fine now. Let Microsoft have some time to work on Windows 10 and the Win 10 updates. Then, read the news articles about any update problems going on in January, if any, and re-evaluate your decision of when the best time to upgrade may be. Remember there is no hurry. You can even wait until next July 2016 to pull the trigger.

    Another article I found today about the KB3081424 cumulative update causing reboot loops can be found here at ZDNet:

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows...or-some-users/

    This article and Gordon Kelly's article at Forbes describe how to make registry edits to provide a temporary fix to clear the reboot issue and then successfully complete the update. You are right that there is no need for you to have to play around with these potentially dangerous manual changes to Windows 10, dangerous if you make the wrong change. No doubt Microsoft is probably working on an update right now to correct this reboot issue and it will all go away in a few days.

    There is no reason for you to participate in this cutting-edge tech scene now. My advice to you is to forget about it for now and think about it again in January.

    David E. Cann

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    FWIW, I think I am noticing a bit of a trend here. In most (not all) of the articles I've read on this today, all of the machines that mentioned the fact were stated as 64-bit systems, as are my 2 desktops that I have not tried to install Win 10 in yet. The laptop that I have upgraded to Windows 10 is 32-bit and apparently doing fine. This does not say there are no 32-bit machines with the issue, only that I am not aware of any after all of a few hours of research. Just something to think about.

    David E. Cann

  18. #15
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    David,

    I would agree with most of the others out here. Sometimes it's best to wait for the smoke to clear a bit before jumping in with both feet. I tend to be a bit of a risk taker and I'm not afraid to sometimes be on the bleeding edge. If you can stand the pain then go for it, otherwise wait.

    My personal experience has been mixed. My laptop that was running Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit upgraded flawlessly. Thinking this was a good sign I went ahead and initiated the upgrade on my Windows 7 Pro 64-bit machine and it kind of turned into a nightmare for a few days. Every time I would invoke Windows Update it would download the files and then it would choke with an 8007005 error which basically says "something" is corrupt on your PC. No clue what or where. I sought help on the internet and tried everything and nothing would allow the update to work. After a few days of frustration I called Microsoft and got help but the Tier 2 Tech took 2 days to finally figure out what it was. Although my PC didn't have any corrupt system files it's configuration and setting were corrupt and the Tech ended up downloading and using a Windows Repair Tool from www.tweaking.com. This utility swept thru my whole system and anything and everything it found that was misconfigured or corrupt, it reset everything back to what it should be. After fixing everything and rebooting the install went flawlessly and since I've been upgraded I think Windows 10 has made my system more stable.

    After seeing the tool I mentioned above it would be my recommendation to download that utility program and run it before you even think about running the upgrade. This tool had a bunch of check boxes on the left side and the screen and the Microsoft Tech checked those that pertained to my Windows 7 Pro and I was amazed as to how the tool functioned. Also I would also run a built-in tool called System File Checker. You run this from the command Windows with the following command: SFC /SCANNOW and you must run it as an administrator. At least if you did do these 2 things you'd have a pretty fair chance at success. Again, if you're nervous then wait it out.
    Last edited by Moondoggy451; 2015-08-09 at 23:29.

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