Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Need to change a motherboard? You will lose Win10 and MS makes you buy a new key

    With Win10, MS is linking your OS to a hardware ID made from the motherboard. If you change the motherboard Win10 deactivates and MS refuses to reactivate it. MS is saying that if you change the motherboard you have made a new computer and must buy a new copy of windows.

    The win8 key that was on the system when it upgraded toWin10 is now blocked on the MS activation servers and will not work to reloadand upgrade he system. I have 3 computers and 3 keys to win8 but can only use 2 of thembecause one of my keys is permanently tied to a burnt out motherboard.

    Microsoft reported profit for the quarter ended June 30, 2015 were $22.2 billion and they have got to extort another $100 from me???

    Way to rip-off the little guys MS!!


  2. #2
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    4,746
    Thanks
    171
    Thanked 649 Times in 572 Posts
    Woody recently said: "Every indication I have says that phone activation still works like a champ – if you can explain your situation clearly, and you’re not trying to steal anything, MS will give you a key."

    In case you missed it… Windows 10 licensing finally explained, a little bit


    In my view, Ed Bott at ZDnet agreed: "Update: In the comments, several people have asked what happens if you make changes to hardware. As I noted earlier, Microsoft doesn't provide details of how it calculates that hardware hash, but upgrades of system components such as a video card or a hard drive won't normally trigger a reactivation. If that happens, a quick call to the activation line will resolve the issue, often without any human contact required, in minutes.

    The one exception is a motherboard replacement, which will inevitably cause the Software Licensing Management utility to recognize the device as a new PC and require reactivation, typically over the phone. A motherboard upgrade, even if you reuse storage, video, memory, and a case, is considered a new PC. In that case, if the underlying Windows license is from a retail copy, that license can be transferred. If you are upgrading (and not replacing) a motherboard on an OEM PC that was sold with Windows preinstalled, the license agreement prevents the license from being transferred.


    Microsoft quietly rewrites its activation rules for Windows 10
    Last edited by BruceR; 2015-08-20 at 14:20.

  3. #3
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    290
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    What happens if you upgrade a retail version of Windows 7 to windows 10?
    George

  4. #4
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    4,746
    Thanks
    171
    Thanked 649 Times in 572 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by High Sierra View Post
    What happens if you upgrade a retail version of Windows 7 to windows 10?
    Care to clarify the question? It appears incomplete.

    If regarding new motherboard, that was included in the last paragraph quoted above.
    Last edited by BruceR; 2015-08-20 at 15:33.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to BruceR For This Useful Post:

    High Sierra (2015-08-31)

  6. #5
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    6,792
    Thanks
    117
    Thanked 798 Times in 719 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by High Sierra View Post
    What happens if you upgrade a retail version of Windows 7 to windows 10?
    I assume you are referring to the old practice of allowing the license to migrate to a different PC with prior OSes. When you upgrade retail Windows 7 (or 8) to Windows 10, you lose that right and the license becomes tied to the PC just like old OEM versions.

    Jerry

  7. #6
    3 Star Lounger djohnson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Delaware City, Delaware
    Posts
    323
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 32 Times in 30 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by BruceR View Post
    Woody recently said: "Every indication I have says that phone activation still works like a champ – if you can explain your situation clearly, and you’re not trying to steal anything, MS will give you a key."

    In case you missed it… Windows 10 licensing finally explained, a little bit


    In my view, Ed Bott at ZDnet agreed: "Update: In the comments, several people have asked what happens if you make changes to hardware. As I noted earlier, Microsoft doesn't provide details of how it calculates that hardware hash, but upgrades of system components such as a video card or a hard drive won't normally trigger a reactivation. If that happens, a quick call to the activation line will resolve the issue, often without any human contact required, in minutes.

    The one exception is a motherboard replacement, which will inevitably cause the Software Licensing Management utility to recognize the device as a new PC and require reactivation, typically over the phone. A motherboard upgrade, even if you reuse storage, video, memory, and a case, is considered a new PC. In that case, if the underlying Windows license is from a retail copy, that license can be transferred. If you are upgrading (and not replacing) a motherboard on an OEM PC that was sold with Windows preinstalled, the license agreement prevents the license from being transferred.


    Microsoft quietly rewrites its activation rules for Windows 10
    I have never had an issue with motherboard replacement. MS was always happy to oblige.

  8. #7
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Polk County, Florida
    Posts
    3,760
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked 424 Times in 338 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    I assume you are referring to the old practice of allowing the license to migrate to a different PC with prior OSes. When you upgrade retail Windows 7 (or 8) to Windows 10, you lose that right and the license becomes tied to the PC just like old OEM versions.
    That isn't what the EULA says:

    "4. Transfer.

    b. Stand-alone software. If you acquired the software as stand-alone software (and also if you upgraded from software you acquired as stand-alone software), you may transfer the software to another device that belongs to you. You may also transfer the software to a device owned by someone else if (i) you are the first licensed user of the software and (ii) the new user agrees to the terms of this agreement. You may use the backup copy we allow you to make or the media that the software came on to transfer the software. Every time you transfer the software to a new device, you must remove the software from the prior device. You may not transfer the software to share licenses between devices."

    If it started retail, it stays retail, can be transferred to another machine you own provided it's uninstalled from the prior machine. "Every time you transfer the software to a new device" seems to indicate that you can move it a number of times.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to bbearren For This Useful Post:

    High Sierra (2015-08-31)

  10. #8
    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Mojave Desert CA
    Posts
    1,842
    Thanks
    258
    Thanked 174 Times in 147 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by TGHertter View Post
    With Win10, MS is linking your OS to a hardware ID made from the motherboard. If you change the motherboard Win10 deactivates and MS refuses to reactivate it. MS is saying that if you change the motherboard you have made a new computer and must buy a new copy of windows.

    The win8 key that was on the system when it upgraded toWin10 is now blocked on the MS activation servers and will not work to reloadand upgrade he system. I have 3 computers and 3 keys to win8 but can only use 2 of thembecause one of my keys is permanently tied to a burnt out motherboard.

    Microsoft reported profit for the quarter ended June 30, 2015 were $22.2 billion and they have got to extort another $100 from me???

    Way to rip-off the little guys MS!!

    Here's an article on that. http://bgr.com/2015/08/25/windows-10...ey-pc-upgrade/

    Every time you change the hardware of your computer, especially major components, there’s a chance that Windows 10 will not recognize the machine as a computer that’s allowed to run an authorized version of Windows 10. Instead, it might be labeled as a non-genuine Windows 10 install, and there’s no automated process to make that kind of error disappear.
    According to How-to Geek, Windows 10 doesn’t come with a serial key that you can use and reuse every time you want to install a fresh copy on the same computer. While the system will automatically detect that you’re allowed to use Windows 10 on a selected machine each time you perform a clean install, it might not do the same once you change individual components, including processor or motherboard.
    As long as your PC’s specs coincide with the ones Microsoft registered about you when it gave you a free Windows 10 update, you’re always going to be just fine. Once those specs differ, you’re in temporary trouble.
    The only fix is contacting Microsoft support to tell them your story, at which point your Windows 10 license will be activated on the computer. To do so, you have to go to the Services & apps app, then Windows, then Setting Up. In there you can chat with a Microsoft support representative or have one call you on the phone so that you can explain your problem and await a fix. A couple of weeks ago, Microsoftconfirmed that’s the way to go, so this solution will fix your Windows 10 activation issues on an upgraded PC.

  11. #9
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Hampshire (the old one)
    Posts
    525
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 72 Times in 62 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by djohnson View Post
    I have never had an issue with motherboard replacement. MS was always happy to oblige.
    Me neither. I have an XP OEM machine that has had a new MB, a new processor, 2 new video cards (problems with fans falling off), and a new HD. Not even a hiccup with activation.

    MS aren't daft - they're fully aware that components have to be replaced, need upgrading and so on. That's not what they're trying to stop.
    Last edited by tonyl; 2015-08-26 at 10:54.

  12. #10
    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Mojave Desert CA
    Posts
    1,842
    Thanks
    258
    Thanked 174 Times in 147 Posts
    I have an XP OEM machine that has had a new MB, a new processor, 2 new video cards (problems with fans falling off), and a new HD. Not even a hiccup with activation.
    Me neither on XP or Win 7, but Win 10 is a new ballgame.

  13. #11
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California, USA
    Posts
    735
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 80 Times in 78 Posts
    To all,

    IIRC, the Windows machine "footprint" in earlier versions resets after 6 months (?or is it 3 months?), then doesn't even require a phonecall reactivation. Like everyone else, I don't know if this holds true for Win 10.

    Zig

  14. #12
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Wow. Talk about some great misinformation. Has anyone here actually replaced a MB with Win 10 on it? I have. You just do the same thing one always does when one's Product Key fails to activate.....Call Microsoft and they will give you a new product key that you type in. I've done this countless times with Win XP, 7 and 8/8.1, and I just did it with Win 10....no issue at all.

    *************************

    Hey you kids...get off my damn lawn!!!

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to jegesq For This Useful Post:

    High Sierra (2015-08-31)

  16. #13
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Fairfax County, Virginia
    Posts
    584
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 61 Times in 49 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by jegesq View Post
    Wow. Talk about some great misinformation. Has anyone here actually replaced a MB with Win 10 on it? I have. You just do the same thing one always does when one's Product Key fails to activate.....Call Microsoft and they will give you a new product key that you type in. I've done this countless times with Win XP, 7 and 8/8.1, and I just did it with Win 10....no issue at all.

    *************************

    Hey you kids...get off my damn lawn!!!
    I have been waiting for someone to actually upgrade a motherboard with windows 10, and report the results. Microsoft will never make anything clear and understandable, it seems to be company policy.

    Thanks for reporting. I have upgraded hardware with XP and 7 and except for motherboards, never needed to call in. I have upgraded motherboards with XP and called in and gotten a new number, but that was a long time ago on a computer I don't have anymore, and I don't remember it that well.

  17. #14
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    67
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I had to change out the motherboard yesterday which I had upgraded to windows 10 pro. The MB went bad and was under warranty. ASUS sent the new board and I installed. Then from the help menu, contacted Microsoft and they took over my computer. After poking around awhile, they input a new product key and gave me the product key number. Everything is now activated. This was all done on Saturday.

  18. #15
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    665
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 26 Times in 24 Posts
    Good to know Mike; I guess, so long as all the other hardware is similar (if not exactly) like prior to the swap, M$ can validate the change then certify the new MB. Still, they never had to "take control" under older OSs like XP (had to do that a lot when I was repairing PCs a few years back). Just had to call M$ and an Indian person would then give me the new activation code. Times have changed obviously.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •