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  1. #1
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    USB 3.0 ports running at USB 2.0 speed

    I'm running Windows 7 Professional 64-bit SP1 on a Lenovo T440s. This has three USB 3.0 ports. I regularly back up to two USB 3.0 external drives (with a third USB 3.0 drive used when traveling). Sometime within the last month, the backups have started taking significantly longer. I've now checked transfer rates (not using backup software: just doing a copy of a large folder in Windows) from all the ports to all the drives using several different USB 3.0 cables, and the ports are running at USB 2.0 speeds (e.g., about 50 MB/sec) instead of the USB 3.0 speeds (e.g., about 90 to 100 MB/sec) I'm used to seeing. I uninstalled and allowed the system to reinstall all of the USB devices in Device Manager, with no effect. I would go back to a known good restore point or backup, except that I can't pinpoint when the change occurred with sufficient precision, and I've made some software changes to the system that would be a real pain to have to re-do. I've gone through all of those software changes, and I can't immediately identify any that appear to be likely causes. I've found some suggestions to update BIOS or drivers, but since neither of those have changed, I'm reluctant to change those without good reason. The only two pieces of software that have been installed that might conceivably have had an effect were a utility that backs up the iPhone to Windows over the USB port (this uses Apple Mobile Devices Support), and the recovery environment for Paragon BackupRecovery Home 15 (that was installed on a USB drive, and the system was successfully test-booted from that drive).

    I'd appreciate any suggestions. Thank you!

  2. #2
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    You've probably already done this but when I find USB or Network hardware issues I shut the computer down and pull the power cord from the back of it, wait a minute or so then start over. Static electricity, even unfelt, can cause issues as can plugging in devices. I have to keep an anti-static touchpad on my desks just for that reason. The unplugging 'normalizes' things, namely the grounding circuitry.

  3. #3
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    Berton, there is no grounding circuitry in USB devices. What you maybe seeing is a poor connection due to oxidisation of the contacts.

    cheers, Paul

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    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    ...there is no grounding circuitry in USB devices...
    Actually, computers' USB ports supply 5 volts DC, which involves +/- (positive/negative) polarity. Negative is also known as the "ground" pole.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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  5. #5
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    Still isn't grounding circuitry.

    cheers, Paul

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    WS Lounge VIP Calimanco's Avatar
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    Open Device Manager. Go to USB Controllers and check that you actually have USB3 drivers installed.

  7. #7
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    Still isn't grounding circuitry.

    cheers, Paul
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    Still isn't grounding circuitry...
    "Grounding": Fastening electrical equipment to earth.
    "Circuitry": Electronic equipment consisting of a system of circuits.
    "Circuit": An electrical device that provides a path for electrical current to flow.

    I have searched for "grounding circuitry" as a term but no meaningful results were returned.

    My experience includes working as a diesel mechanic on farm tractors and trucks/semi-trailers and as a welder/boilermaker operating my owner-operator welding workshop for more than 23 years.

    Unless one "pole" (whether positive ["North"] or negative ["South']) of an electrical circuit is "grounded" ("earthed") the circuit won't work at all; nothing will happen.

    Electricity depends on planet Earth's electromagnetic field (the "North"/"South" polarity) to work.

    In a typical mains power connection one side (almost always the "negative" or "neutral" pole - the black wire) will be "grounded" (AKA "Earthed") to a metal spike driven into the ground somewhere; usually the spike is at least 18inches but more often 24inches long, either steel or copper).

    Yeah, I know someone will object "but my smart phone/touchpad/laptop works fine w/o being connected to mains power" but at some time the device will have to be connected to recharge the battery when the "grounding" will occur once again.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Electricity depends on planet Earth's electromagnetic field (the "North"/"South" polarity) to work.
    Nope, no such requirement - spacecraft wouldn't work if that were the case. All you need is a loop from the source, battery etc, through the circuit, light globe etc, and back.

    cheers, Paul

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    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    ...spacecraft wouldn't work if that were the case. All you need is a loop from the source, battery etc, through the circuit, light globe etc, and back...
    Spacecraft leave Earth with batteries charged according to Earth's electromagnetic field. As to how spacecraft's batteries are subsequently recharged I have no idea but suspect that it would involve something similar to what we have here on Earth.
    "Loop from the source"??? Isn't that what positive/negative polarity entails in any case?
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    Spacecraft have solar panels to generate electricity from the Sun. No need for anything Earth based.
    "Loop from the source" means you don't need to connect to anything else, including the Earth.
    Electricity can also be Alternating Current (AC), which does not have positive/negative, but it is still a loop.

    cheers, Paul

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    Berton, there is no grounding circuitry in USB devices. What you maybe seeing is a poor connection due to oxidisation of the contacts.

    cheers, Paul
    Read it again, I was talking about the power supply in the computer which is what provides power to the motherboard which in turn powers the USB ports.

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  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Fascist Nation For This Useful Post:

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    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Electricity depends on planet Earth's electromagnetic field (the "North"/"South" polarity) to work.

    .
    No Coochin just plain untrue. I think you are conflating info on Electrical Fields and Magnetic Fields.
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  15. #14
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    The "ground" in a car is the metal structure of the card, and all metal which touches it. The negative terminal of the battery is connected to the metal structure of the car. This allows you to run one wire to a device (the positive wire) rather than two. The negative connection on the device is simply connected to the metal structure of the car.

    In a house or some other kind of building, the "ground" works the same way. The electric company uses the Earth as one wire, and the electric wire on the pole as the other wire. The third, or ground, wire in an electrical outlet is simply an alternate path for the electricity to get to the earth, in case there is a problem with the normal path.

  16. #15
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    Nope, that's not how it works. This wikipedia section sums it up nicely.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electr...al_differences

    cheers, Paul

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