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    Question Power down hard drive while watching DVD?

    I was wondering if it's possible to power down the hard drive in my computer so it won't be spinning when I'm watching a DVD. I watch DVD's on my computer while my wife watches her shows on the TV. I think it's a waste to have the hard drive running while everything is coming from the DVD, and RAM should be able to run Media Player in Win 7. Any comments/ideas would be much appreciated.

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    When one considers that the screen is being drawn by the OS [Operating System] and the sound is being provided by the OS it may not be possible to turn off the device where the OS is stored and still get the desired effect.

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    Okay, OS & HDD are needed to play a DVD on a computer. Thanks. I was hoping the graphics and audio cards could maybe handle it without constant supervision from the OS. That would save wear & tear on my hard drive.

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    You do not need to save wear and tear on your hard drive, it will put up with amazing abuse and run for years. It will eventually fail (maybe before you replace it) and that is what backups are for.

    cheers, Paul

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CEScott View Post
    I was wondering if it's possible to power down the hard drive in my computer so it won't be spinning when I'm watching a DVD. I watch DVD's on my computer while my wife watches her shows on the TV. I think it's a waste to have the hard drive running while everything is coming from the DVD, and RAM should be able to run Media Player in Win 7. Any comments/ideas would be much appreciated.
    No, not possible, and no reason to even think about doing so.
    If you want to minimize HDD activity, close ALL non essential running tasks except the one at hand.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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    Thank you all for the replies. I sort of thought it was going to turn out that way. I do have a concern about my HDD dying prematurely before I've gotten another one to replace it. My main computer that use most was built in December of 2012 and has a Seagate ST1500DL003, 1500GB, Barracuda, Green, P/N 9VT16L, SATA II hard drive. It spins at 5900 rpm and runs cool, is fast, and very quiet. I'm thinking to get another one just like it and have found them on Amazon.com. but they have been sitting on a shelf for at least 3 years.

    I'm planning on staying with Win 7 as long as I can and I've always had a second hard drive ready to take over in case of a failure. I plan to copy (clone, image) everything to the new drive. My motherboard is an ASUS P8H61-M LE CSM Rev. 3.0, B3 Revision. Does this sound like a good plan? Or should I go with a newer hard drive. Also, is having a HDD sent through the mail from Amazon a good idea? I've had HDD's sent that way before with no problems. Please let me know what you think. Thanks.

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    I purchase drives online almost exclusively and have not had any issues to speak of, ..except the time when the UPS guys left the box at my door without me signing and it got stolen.

    It is a good idea to keep a spare drive at the ready in case your primary fails, that is why I have so
    many extra internal drives, especially extra SSD drives.

    Cloning, although doable, isn't needed and frankly more a waste of space, image restoration to the spare drive is more than sufficient.

    You'll get a noticable speed increase by replacing that 5900 rpm Seagate with a SATA III rated SSD.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2015-10-17 at 23:53.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
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    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CLiNT View Post
    You'll get a noticable speed increase by replacing that 5900 rpm Seagate with a SATA III rated SSD.
    Thanks CLiNT, I'll have to find out if my mobo supports SATA III. The Seagate HDD I have is fast enough for my needs. At any rate, I would want to test any new drive asap to make sure it's in good condition and ready to go into use when needed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CEScott View Post
    Thanks CLiNT, I'll have to find out if my mobo supports SATA III. The Seagate HDD I have is fast enough for my needs. At any rate, I would want to test any new drive asap to make sure it's in good condition and ready to go into use when needed.
    Also frequent starts and stops MAY put more stress on a HHD than just letting it spin
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wavy View Post
    Also frequent starts and stops MAY put more stress on a HHD than just letting it spin
    Good point. I had thought of that too since just moving the mouse would most likely cause the HDD to spin up again. Thanks.

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    I'm finding it easier to go with a newer Seagate 2 TB, 7200 rpm HDD. My current drive is a partitioned 1.5 TB Seagate. If I copy (image) everything to a 2 TB will I need to do any repartitioning on either drive? Please forgive my ignorance as far as this goes, it's something I've never done before.

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    Using a clone tool will create partitions on the new disk, but you will need to tell it how to allocate the additional space. You could expand both partitions, only one or create another partition.
    Why do you want to use partitions?

    cheers, Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    Using a clone tool will create partitions on the new disk, but you will need to tell it how to allocate the additional space. You could expand both partitions, only one or create another partition.
    Why do you want to use partitions?l
    I had heard that it's a good idea to have a second drive or partition to put data in. I also originally used the second partition for backups, which I've stopped and am now doing the backups to an external USB drive. There is really no other reason for the second partition and I'd really rather just have one if possible. I forgot to mention that I have a very small 100MB "Reserved" partition that has no drive letter. I will leave that alone naturally.

    One other question - does decreasing or increasing the size of a partition harm or destroy any data on that partition? I may just decrease the size of the second partition since it's way oversized right now.

    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by CEScott View Post
    One other question - does decreasing or increasing the size of a partition harm or destroy any data on that partition? I may just decrease the size of the second partition since it's way oversized right now.

    Thanks
    I normally have 2 HDDs in my Desktops, right now 2 are 250GB and 500GB and one is 320GB and 320GB.

    As for data loss, there's always a chance, however slight, that one will have a problem in manipulating partitions which is why I do it only on computers connected to a UPS, unexpected power failures can cause major problems. An issue with partitions is the possibility that if the drive faces problems it may see them on all partitions. Backup copies of data you created or that exists nowhere else are always worthwhile. I prefer simply copying such data to an external drive, either USB, eSATA or NAS, mostly because any computer that can access that drive can use the data.

    I just finished cleaning up an ASUS Win7 Notebook with 2 partitions. For some odd reason it had been partitioned with 75GB for C: and 210GB for D: and she was running out of room. I reduced the D: partition to 15GB at the end of the drive to hold the data already on it and Extended the newly unallocated space between the 2 partitions into C:, should keep her going for quite awhile.
    Last edited by Berton; 2015-11-03 at 13:16.

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    It's worth remembering that a hard drive is a high quality mechanical device. They use proper bearings that allow the drive to rotate at high speed for years and years. The manufacturing tolerances are incredible. Therefore the whole "wear and tear" argument is weak in my opinion.

    Now power savings, that's another story. I'm all for that. The problem is, you need to defer to the computer on when and how to do that. Set your power settings to levels you can live with and then leave them alone.

    Just because you think, "all I'm doing is watching a movie", you don't necessarily have a handle on what the computer is doing. It could be:

    1). Running a scheduled maintenance (or other) task;
    2). Performing automated updates of the OS or applications;
    3). Performing read buffering of the DVD, which could (in theory) spill to virtual memory on the hard drive.

    That last one is a little weak to be honest, but it makes a point. The player functions of the software are a black box to the user. Indeed much of the OS is as well. We know or infer all kinds of stuff about how the software works and what it is doing, but still it's a user view of the system. Additional activities beyond what we normally see or care about could be going on.

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