Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    966
    Thanks
    661
    Thanked 58 Times in 57 Posts

    Printer startup cleaning cycle

    In this weeks newsletter there is

    Remedies for common printer pains
    http://windowssecrets.com/best-pract...printer-pains/

    I am wondering about this statement “Don’t turn off your printer. Inkjet printers use a bare trickle of electricity when left on — but consume extra ink every time they go through their startup cleaning cycle.”
    --- When I start my printer what is the startup cleaning cycle – in other words what is it cleaning?
    --- I thought it’s going through a “homing” cycle

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    South Glos., UK
    Posts
    2,143
    Thanks
    101
    Thanked 579 Times in 464 Posts
    All the inkjets I've used have, on power up, moved the print head(s) to one end of the carriage track. Whilst there, the printer pumps ink through the nozzles in the print head(s) to make sure they aren't blocked with dried ink then wipes the print head(s) on a block of sponge to finish off the cleaning cycle. This is preferable to having to manually clean blocked nozzles.

    Hope this helps...

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Rick Corbett For This Useful Post:

    cmptrgy (2015-10-22)

  4. #3
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    966
    Thanks
    661
    Thanked 58 Times in 57 Posts
    The way you describe it sounds absolutely right

  5. #4
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,401
    Thanks
    447
    Thanked 404 Times in 376 Posts
    It seems to me that if you leave your printer powered on, it will be a bit warm, which will help to keep the ink from drying. However, if you leave it powered off for long periods of time, it will stay cold, and the ink will be more likely to dry, and therefore clog up the printer.

    However, I don't believe that short periods of being off will have this same effect, especially if you print (i.e. keep the ink flowing) regularly.

    But I do believe it is better to leave it on all the time.

    I donated a printer to my church several months ago. They didn't need it, so it has sat in storage, off and unplugged, for several months. I hope that it will work when they finally plug it in and turn it on.
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2015-10-23 at 08:17.

  6. #5
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Delaware, US
    Posts
    1,165
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 99 Times in 88 Posts
    Ink jet printers often seem to be designed to waste ink and they seem to be extremely efficient at that job. This would seem to be supported by the outrageously low cost of the printer vs the ink.

    It's hard to sort out what's documented fact from what's anecdotal and some printers are different than others. Plus, changes in firmware could make two different copies of the same model act differently.

    There have been numerous articles written about stopping the cleaning cycles from wasting ink, but it's difficult to know what the correct answer is. If you use an inkjet on a daily basis then it probably won't hurt to leave it turned on, but it's hard to say if it will help all that much either.

    Frankly, after looking at the 5yr cost of operating an inkjet vs a laser, I have opted to stick with a laser since I don't need color printing.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

  7. #6
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    2,374
    Thanks
    235
    Thanked 147 Times in 136 Posts
    Laser is the way to go for most. If you want to print a photo go to CVS.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  8. #7
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,401
    Thanks
    447
    Thanked 404 Times in 376 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith-plm View Post
    Frankly, after looking at the 5yr cost of operating an inkjet vs a laser, I have opted to stick with a laser since I don't need color printing.
    Color printing is the main reason I have stayed with inkjet all these years. Also, you can get an inkjet copier/printer/scanner for next to nothing (around $30) at walmart.com, with free delivery to your local Walmart. I recently bought a Canon Pixma with wifi connectivity for $35 at walmart.com. I don't do much printing, so it doesn't bother me that Canon is notorious for using lots of ink.

    I do a lot of scanning, though, and my "bottom of the line" Canon is good for that, except that it doesn't have an automatic document feeder. That would be a nice thing to have.

    If I did lots of printing, I'd get a laser printer.

  9. #8
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    6,794
    Thanks
    117
    Thanked 799 Times in 720 Posts
    I too user a laser for most of my printing but bought a wireless Canon Pixma MX892 from Costco to support printing from my Ipads and laptop. I get replacement ink carts from Meritline. Less than $10 for a full set. The printer can sit for a long time without clogging when I do print. Sometimes over a month of idle time. I leave it on all the time so the wireless connection is always accessible.

    Jerry

  10. #9
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    South Glos., UK
    Posts
    2,143
    Thanks
    101
    Thanked 579 Times in 464 Posts
    I've just stumbled across an article from June of last year that lists the annual energy costs of devices left on standby (as opposed to being switched off at the wall). You can read the full article here: The devices quietly running up your energy bills

    Examples:
    Wireless Router - £21.92 ($33.57)
    Printer (Laser) - £18.26 ($27.96)
    iPad charger - £12.18 ($18.65)
    Modem - £6.09 ($9.33)
    Inkjet printer - £4.26 ($6.52)
    Desktop PC - £3.65 ($5.59)
    PC monitor (CRT) - £2.44 ($3.74)

    The article lists lots more domestic devices.

    Hope this helps...

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Rick Corbett For This Useful Post:

    cmptrgy (2015-10-24)

  12. #10
    jwoods
    Guest
    I used an HP LaserJet for many years, and just recently replaced it with an Epson WF-4630.

    Laser quality, and less cost per page than the HP.

  13. #11
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    926
    Thanks
    554
    Thanked 137 Times in 128 Posts
    How do you put a wifi router on standby?

  14. #12
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    2,374
    Thanks
    235
    Thanked 147 Times in 136 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Fascist Nation View Post
    How do you put a wifi router on standby?
    Don't use it?

    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  15. #13
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Delaware, US
    Posts
    1,165
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 99 Times in 88 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Corbett View Post
    I've just stumbled across an article from June of last year...
    The problem with articles like this is that it's a short newspaper article quoting from another source with no way of knowing what the science is behind the numbers. It's not even clear how old the data is since it's referring to CRT monitors which are largely dinosaurs now.

    IOW, it could be somewhat correct or wildly inaccurate - no way to tell.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

  16. #14
    jwoods
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith-plm View Post
    The problem with articles like this is that it's a short newspaper article quoting from another source with no way of knowing what the science is behind the numbers. It's not even clear how old the data is since it's referring to CRT monitors which are largely dinosaurs now.

    IOW, it could be somewhat correct or wildly inaccurate - no way to tell.
    According to the article, the study was done by Ecotricity...

    http://www.ecotricity.co.uk/

    You might ask them.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •