Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    967
    Thanks
    662
    Thanked 58 Times in 57 Posts

    Wondering how to replace a hard drive

    Yesterday I serviced an HP p6716f desktop Win7 HP (x64) SP1 for a tuneup and it went well.
    However the hard drive LED was always amber and the computer runs slow.
    According to Belarc the hard drive is a 1 TB ST31000528AS: I believe it makes sense to replace it

    The owner wants to upgrade to Windows 10, the computer is ready for it and Iím in favor of doing so.
    However, the computer is 5 years old. I canít find the manual for the computer and Iím not familiar with hard drive LEDS but my home computer hard drive LED is white so I suspect an amber LED is a sign of impending issues whatever they are.

    I just burned a Sea Tools for DOS onto DVD-R on my home computer so I could test the hard drive on his computer but I believe it makes sense to just replace the hard drive before upgrading to Windows 10.

    Iím not a hardware person but mechanically I can replace the hard drive.

    When installing a new hard drive are instructions included in setting it up?
    --- I have seen references to initializing, formatting and partitioning but Iím not experienced with doing whatever in correct order and/or partition sizes.
    --- Will restoring a system image backup ensure that the new hard drive is partitioned the same way the original hard drive was?

    My plan is to create a system image backup of the Windows 7 system on its original hard drive
    Install & setup the new hard drive
    Restore the Windows 7 system image backup onto the new hard drive
    --- Is that possible to do onto a different hard drive?

    Windows 10 will come later as I want to make sure he can revert back to Windows 7 if he or his wife do not like Windows 10

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Mojave Desert CA
    Posts
    1,844
    Thanks
    258
    Thanked 175 Times in 148 Posts
    IF you are confident that the present OS is ok and want to replace the HDD with everything on it, I would suggest cloning software. Personally I use Casper and it formats/clones the current HDD to be a complete/exact/bootable replacement HDD. That's what I did for my laptop that I wanted to upgrade for Win 10. After cloning the original HDD to a new HDD, I removed the original HDD and replaced it with the clone and then upgraded to Win 10. All went smooth.
    HTH

  3. #3
    jwoods
    Guest
    "I just burned a Sea Tools for DOS onto DVD-R on my home computer so I could test the hard drive on his computer but I believe it makes sense to just replace the hard drive before upgrading to Windows 10."

    I would run SeaTools first before incurring the additional cost of a new drive to the customer.

    Another tool if you do this kind of work on a regular basis is SpinRite, from GRC.com. It's not free, but can often do repairs other tools cannot.

  4. #4
    Silver Lounger wavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    2,378
    Thanks
    235
    Thanked 147 Times in 136 Posts
    Do an image FIRST.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Manning, South Carolina
    Posts
    9,436
    Thanks
    372
    Thanked 1,457 Times in 1,326 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by cmptrgy View Post
    According to Belarc the hard drive is a 1 TB ST31000528AS: I believe it makes sense to replace it
    Interesting this drive is $70 at Amazon and 136 at NewEgg!
    My plan is to create a system image backup of the Windows 7 system on its original hard drive
    Install & setup the new hard drive
    Restore the Windows 7 system image backup onto the new hard drive
    --- Is that possible to do onto a different hard drive?
    Yes it is possible. However, I'd suggest:
    1. Get a Free copy of Macrium Reflect.
    2. Install and create the Windows PE Boot media (this can be done on a different computer).
    3. Do an Image backup by booting from the Boot media you created.
    4. Install the new drive.
    5. Again booting from the Boot media restore the image. (It will do all the partitioning necessary).


    You may find this How-To-Geek article helpful.
    HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

    PowerShell & VBA Rule!

    My Systems: Desktop Specs
    Laptop Specs

  6. #6
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,154
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 307 Times in 267 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by cmptrgy View Post
    ...
    According to Belarc the hard drive is a 1 TB ST31000528AS: I believe it makes sense to replace it...
    If the drive tests OK why replace it?

    You could look up the HDD's serial number on Seagate's support website to see if there is updated firmware available. I have updated the firmware on a number of Seagate HDDs that were misbehaving and the newer firmware fixed the problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by cmptrgy View Post
    ...I’m not familiar with hard drive LEDS but my home computer hard drive LED is white so I suspect an amber LED is a sign of impending issues whatever they are...
    The colour of HDD LEDs varies; some computers have red, others blue, white, yellow, green...

    What is more meaningful is the behaviour of the LED. If it stays on all-or-most of the time that could be an indication of a sick HDD, but could also be caused by software issues.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
    Most common computing error is EBKAC: Error Between Keyboard And Chairback
    AMD FX8120 (8-core @ 3.1GHz) CPU, Gigabyte GA-990FXA-D3 motherboard, 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1866MHz RAM, ATI-AMD Radeon HD6770 PCI-E VGA, 480GB Kingston SSD, 2TB Seagate SATA3.0 HDD, ASUS DVD/RW.

  7. #7
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,191
    Thanks
    48
    Thanked 986 Times in 916 Posts
    +1 for don't replace.
    +1 for Macrium if you do replace.

    Alternatively, add an SSD for the OS and keep the 1TB for large data / backup image of C:. Then the computer will really fly.

    cheers, Paul

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Paul T For This Useful Post:

    cmptrgy (2015-10-29)

  9. #8
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    967
    Thanks
    662
    Thanked 58 Times in 57 Posts
    Thanks everyone. On the color of the hard drive LED, I learned it isn't dependent on a potential issue with the hard drive along with the fact it's a poor indication also of the hard drive being sick.
    So I will run the Sea Tools for DOS
    I will create a system image backup which I am very familiar with as I do that on each of my 2 Windows 7 computers: I also use MR Free
    And then Windows 10, here we come

  10. #9
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    967
    Thanks
    662
    Thanked 58 Times in 57 Posts
    @ Paul "add an SSD for the OS and keep the 1TB for large data / backup image of C:."
    Does this mean that the SSD drive is drive C and has Windows, Office applications, Security programs etc. on drive C but work on the 1 TB drive for data, pictures etc.?

  11. #10
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,191
    Thanks
    48
    Thanked 986 Times in 916 Posts
    Pretty much. I keep all my docs on my SSD but music and vids are on the mech, along with backups of the SSD.

    cheers, Paul

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Paul T For This Useful Post:

    cmptrgy (2015-10-26)

  13. #11
    WS Lounge VIP Calimanco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    721
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 144 Times in 130 Posts
    One thing that hasn't been mentioned is that, before upgrading to W10, check that both installed software and hardware are compatible with W10 by running the compatibility checker, thus avoiding any unpleasant surprises.

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/will-yo...r-to-find-out/

    You should also check for updated drivers for attached printers etc. and software updates for installed programs.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Calimanco For This Useful Post:

    cmptrgy (2015-10-27)

  15. #12
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    967
    Thanks
    662
    Thanked 58 Times in 57 Posts
    I plan on going to HP's website and run their Windows 10 upgrade check to see how it works
    I'm hoping that checking for updated drivers is included

    On checking for software updates for installed programs definitely makes sense and I have that on my checklist

    EDIT: Calimanco I just read the zdnet article you posted. What a nice easy read: it's a keeper for me.
    Last edited by cmptrgy; 2015-10-27 at 07:52.

  16. #13
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    926
    Thanks
    554
    Thanked 137 Times in 128 Posts
    http://support.hp.com/us-en/product/...30AQO5O3KA30B3

    http://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c03018597

    HP support can be a pain but it isn't that hard.

    I recognize the case from a memory upgrade. Easy HDD replacement. Single screw to get cover off. 4 screws hold the drive from the bottom (std holes). Pull the 2 cables, 3 screws and leave the 4th until you can support the drive and remove. Reverse order install. Only room for one drive, weird arrangement. MB on "wrong" side of case but not a micro-BTX.
    Last edited by Fascist Nation; 2015-10-28 at 19:40.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •