Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Aiken, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Migrating Win10 OS from SSD to m.2

    I had never done this before so I may well have made several goofs which I'd love to hear about.

    First I upgraded to Win10 which didn't go perfectly but I corrected what I needed. This was on a system I built with Intelís X-99 chipset and a ASUS x99 Deluxe/3.1 motherboard (updated UEFI) with all the bells and whistles, an Intel i7-5930k, 32GB of DDR4 memory, a number of SSDís and a pair of AMD Radeon R9 280ís. I had to reinstall chipset drivers, USB 3.0, LAN and graphics drivers. The system was working fine with the OS on a Crucial 256GB SSD. Most apps were on a separate drive except those that insist on using C drive.

    Then I decided to take the build to the final stage and migrate the OS to an m.2 PCIE-3.0. I used Paragon Hard Disk Manager software which supposedly can handle SSDs just fine, not just hard disks. From what I read, "migrating" the OS was supposed to avoid what actually happened.
    Am I right that migrating the OS is supposed to include the OS and any other hidden drives or partitions needed to boot the OS?
    What happened was the MBR got so mangled that neither the SSD nor the m.2 were bootable. I was able to rebuild the MBR on the SSD but the m.2 was toast. I was able to RMA the m.2 for a replacement. This may have had nothing to do with the software. The m.2 formatted just fine in the beginning.

    So what did I do wrong? Would it have been better to copy the OS to the m.2? Would it have been better to use Win10's backup and restore? (Can I even restore to a different drive?)
    Thanks for any input you can give me.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    California & Arizona
    Posts
    6,121
    Thanks
    160
    Thanked 609 Times in 557 Posts
    You would have been better off imaging the OS, including partitions, from the SSD, then restoring the
    image to the M.2 drive. Boot and format the original SSD drive prior to image restoration.
    Make certain that the M.2 drive is installed and shows up in BIOS and as an image restoration option when you go to
    boot to the restoration disk with the imaging application of your choice.
    (preferably a 3rd party option and NOT MS's Backup & Restore)

    All your applications should be on the primary drive, assuming that one is your fastest drive.
    Some folks like to install their programs on different drives, but as far as I'm concerned all it
    does is add that extra and unnecessary layer of complexity.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2015-11-12 at 17:12.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

  3. #3
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Aiken, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Thanks a lot for the information. Wouldn't unplugging the original SSD have the same effect as formatting it. Having the information still on the SSD is what saved me the last time. I did have an image backup on another drive which I could have used, and you're saying that's what I should have restored from, right?

    I understand your position on apps. But one reason I like them on another drive is that there are some that install on C whether or not you want them there. Unless you have a very large drive the accumulated apps, on top of App Data, Win sxs, and other Windows files (not to mention Pictures, Documents, Videos, etc) that grow ever larger take up tremendous space. This I think is a burden on the system and backup drive when you do incremental backups of C. I'm not a really big gamer but today's games can take up a several GB each. And I am an app freak particularly those in graphics including Adobe Creative Suite6, Gimp, Corel Painter and Corel PaintShop Pro to mention a few. If I had a reasonable # I'd probably agree with you and switch my ways. And when the price of m.2's come down and storage increases I may well do it then too.

    Thanks again. I will use your information to migrate to my replacement m.2

  4. #4
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    California & Arizona
    Posts
    6,121
    Thanks
    160
    Thanked 609 Times in 557 Posts
    Those program file associations of the apps installed off the primary may or may not survive the transfer,
    so you might be better off uninstalling them prior to, then re-installing them as your previous preferences.
    This way future image restorations of your OS with the program installation links will survive.

    Installing top heavy apps with huge data stores are definitely worth installing on another drive, just not your run of the mill
    programs that are not loaded with hundreds of MB worth of "stuff" (?).
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2016-01-07 at 03:40.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •