Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 45
  1. #1
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Austin metro area TX USA
    Posts
    1,731
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 128 Times in 125 Posts

    Data recovery using six DPs on four test partitions

    Data Recovery using 6 DPs on 4 test partitions

    ** Because of Windows OS and 3rd party programs and utilities constant cycle of deleting, copying, writing, deleting, copying, writing...
    The sooner, one learns of any unwanted deletion[s], the sooner one engages any process of undelete and/or data recovery, the better the chances of quality undelete or recovery!
    An undelete's or data recovery's listing of "undeleted or recovered" folders and files does not mean each and every "undeleted or recovered" file is actually readable and or usable. Listing results and real undeletion/recovery can vary significantly.**
    [I have been using Resplendence's Undelux awhile now, and I remain surprised as to the busy-ness of Windows OS and 3rd party stuff constant cycle of delete, copy, write, delete, copy, write.]

    I'm starting this thread here to gather experiences from others who have attempted and succeeded in data recovery.
    This topic is not all important or exciting -- until one needs to recover critical or important folders & files accidentally deleted or quick-formatted. I remember one poster somewhere on the 'Net indicating s/he "tried everything" with several data recovery programs -- which lead me to believe that what was displayed on the monitor did not match end-user expectations.

    Wanting to presently being very efficient and effective with, and someday tutorialize how to use, the various tools within just six data recovery programs [or utilities], set up 4 1GB test partitions [formatted and named Fat16, Fat32, NTFS, [Un][Delete].
    After setting up the 4 test partitions, after full-formatting same, copied the test folders from my d-partition onto said test partitions -- each 1GB partition having two folders with selected files, 1 normal folder in which the files themselves have been deleted, 1 folder of which I simply deleted. The selected files have various extensions such as: mp3, mp4, zip, htm, doc, txt, etc. I named the two folders Undeleted Folder and Deleted Folder.
    From the beginning I'm used Acronis Disk Director to create the test partitions, I used Windows 7 Professional 64 bit NTFS to create the test folders and for copying the already-existing files into said folders. Essentially, W7Pro is the Windows being used by the six DPs. If there are any read/write engines built into the high-end DPs, I'll try to mention them as I use them.
    I changed one partition into DeletedPartition and added one more into the soup: FormattedPartition.
    I "converted" the contents in all partitions into: 1DeletedFiles [folder], 2Deleted Folder, 3DeletedFilesAndFolder, 4FormattedFolder -- to represent the most common problems that lead to either a folder/file restore from a previous backup or onward to data recovery [ranging from Whew!GotEmBack! all the way to HoleyMoley100Steps!].
    Data Recovery using 6 Data Recovery Programs on 4 Test Partitions

    I simply had to choose what programs and utilities to use, out of so many great choices!, I settled on:
    Piriform Recova, Wise Data Recovery, MiniTool Power Data Recovery, Restorer Ultimate, Steller and R-Studio.

    A quick review of some things. Long ago, us old timers heard of and used terms such as FAT [File Allocation Tables] and DIRectories which were stored right after Boot Sector on Track Zero. FAT and DIR are part of the main post office to the houses, i.e. the folders and files on the magnetic media. I'm not concerned with CDs and DVDs at this time.
    Using an anology that can be snapped like a rubber band if stretched too far: You and your family are the contents within your house, a specific file. The post office knows your street address number and your family name. When a file is simply deleted, the main post office no longer has your [beginning] house number nor the first letter of your family name. If the whole block [a folder] is deleted, although the main post office probably no longer has the stuff mentioned earlier, however, if you're lucky, a sub-station just might have the needed numbers and first letters [along with the whole names] for that block [folder]. Any over-written file, regardless of how or with what the file was over-written with: the people in the house are removed, and often the house itself is in shambles to some degree.
    At this time, I cannot visualize how NTFS is structured, and how it keeps the first address and the name of folders and files. Maybe my use of DMDE will help me discover and visualize this process. I used DMDE's Disk Editor to attempt to locate my FAT16 test partition's Track Zero and its FAT and DIR structure -- didn't recognize it. Using Windows 7 Pro to create, format, write folders & files onto a FAT16 partition probably not the same as using Windows for Workgroup 3.11?

    FAT16 partition, Piriform Recover appeared to give a very easy to work with, understandable, screen of recoverable files within Undeleted Folder. Had to head for home, later, will check and see if all or only half of the files were listed.
    Wise Data Recovery, while the recovery menu was very easy to work with, it was a little bit "muddy:" half the recoverable files had their correct names, the other half of the recoverable files had manufactered names.
    For the beginner, Piriform Recova seems easier to use, has much less geek-assigned file-names, whether FAT16, FAT32 or NTFS. Wise was much friendlier in my NTFS partition. Piriform Recova did not enter in adv-mode for me today [I had to task-break it]; maybe will try again later.

    MiniTool and Restorer, in FAT16 partition, operate much like Piriform Recova, very few files are missing their first character, most have full names listed. I suspect the same will be true for FAT32. Both, in the NTFS partition, listed only a few files. Not sure why yet. Will find out later in deeper tests.
    Steller and R-Studio early-bird menu items revealed the same listing as the aforementioned others for FAT16, and I suspect will do so for FAT32.
    Steller's Preview works really well. R-Studio's Preview often coughs up the View and Edit mode rather than the Preview.
    Both of these, within the NTFS partition, only listed a few files. Again, not sure why, maybe can find out later in deeper tests.
    ** Unless somebody want them, I will not be listing the keystrokes, buttons, etc. to click, push, etc. at this point. **
    Last edited by RolandJS; 2016-01-20 at 10:37.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to RolandJS For This Useful Post:

    Fascist Nation (2015-12-08)

  3. #2
    WS Lounge VIP Calimanco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    721
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 144 Times in 130 Posts
    You may also want to check out the free version of PassMark OSForensics. It has most of the facilities of the paid for version ($500). It is serious overkill for most users though.

    http://www.osforensics.com/osforensics.html

  4. #3
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Austin metro area TX USA
    Posts
    1,731
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 128 Times in 125 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Calimanco View Post
    You may also want to check out the free version of PassMark OSForensics. It has most of the facilities of the paid for version ($500). It is serious overkill for most users though.
    http://www.osforensics.com/osforensics.html
    Califmanco, thanks for inputing! I had to pick my six or else I would be bogged down with too many programs I do hope others will input with their experiences with their favorite DR utilities.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  5. #4
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Delaware, US
    Posts
    1,170
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 99 Times in 88 Posts
    Last year I spent about an hour working on a friends computer to recover some deleted files. Many years ago, I went through something similar on a clients laptop computer after a trip. They admitted that they had screwed up and deleted the files when they intended to move them to the server. Still not clear why they were not in the recycle bin in either of these two cases.

    While I expect that some professional software may be able to do a better job, I have yet to see any freeware or even modestly prices software that will do a very good job. It's even worse when a whole folder is removed.

    As to testing, NTFS is going to be the most important to the most people. I wish you luck as this is not an easy task. One note, testing on a small partition created for the purpose is going to be different than trying to recover files on a well used disk. Still, any testing is worthwhile.
    Graham Smith
    DataSmith, Delaware
    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

  6. #5
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    4,749
    Thanks
    171
    Thanked 650 Times in 573 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by RolandJS View Post
    Data Recovery using 6 DPs on 4 test partitions
    What's a DP?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DP

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to BruceR For This Useful Post:

    Fascist Nation (2015-11-19)

  8. #6
    jwoods
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by BruceR View Post
    Definitely Paranoid

    Seriously...I think he is talking about Deleted Partitions.
    Last edited by jwoods; 2015-11-19 at 00:14.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to jwoods For This Useful Post:

    Fascist Nation (2015-11-19)

  10. #7
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    13
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    I am going for: Data Recovering Program(s) as he is talking about:

    "Data Recovery using 6 DPs on 4 test partitions" and "Data Recovery using 6 Data Recovery Programs on 4 Test Partitions".

  11. #8
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    28
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Slightly off topic perhaps, one of the best strategies for preventing loss of data, as pointed out by several experts, is to make regular full-system image backups. Macrium Reflect is one of the best, in my experience. It has also the possibility of retrieving single files from a full image. It also has the option of verifying the backup after making it.
    The full-system image backup method, apart from being able to recover single files and folders, of course has the ability to get your system up and running after a complete break-down, and quite easily too.
    Recently I tried to install an update of my graphics card (Nvidia GeForce) with the result that the screen went totally blank (not even blue). Could not restart. Installing the latest full-image solved the problem quickly.

  12. #9
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Austin metro area TX USA
    Posts
    1,731
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 128 Times in 125 Posts
    toktok is absolutely correct! And, so are the other posters about "DP" -- that should really be DRP, Data Recovery Programs. toktok's comments about having regular restorable backups are apples of gold on silver platters. I do make regular backups. I'm just beginning to learn about Data Recovery because very important things [folders and files] can disappear between backups, which means, sometimes, such folder and files were not backed 'cause they did not exist during, or were majorly-changed after, the last one or two backups.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  13. #10
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    28
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks for the answer.
    Between the system-image backups, backup of new/changed files and folders is a good idea. For instance to external harddisk, USB or cloud service like Dropbox. For instance, working on a document that is in your Dropbox folder, it will be backup'd immediately on a Save.
    Last edited by toktok; 2015-11-19 at 14:49.

  14. #11
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,482
    Thanks
    176
    Thanked 152 Times in 129 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith-plm View Post
    Last year I spent about an hour working on a friends computer to recover some deleted files. Many years ago, I went through something similar on a clients laptop computer after a trip. They admitted that they had screwed up and deleted the files when they intended to move them to the server. Still not clear why they were not in the recycle bin in either of these two cases.

    While I expect that some professional software may be able to do a better job, I have yet to see any freeware or even modestly prices software that will do a very good job. It's even worse when a whole folder is removed.

    As to testing, NTFS is going to be the most important to the most people. I wish you luck as this is not an easy task. One note, testing on a small partition created for the purpose is going to be different than trying to recover files on a well used disk. Still, any testing is worthwhile.
    I've tried to recover data from hard drives and from SD cards using Recuva and a few other free utilities.

    I have to agree that these tools are marginal at best, especially if any disk activity has intervened between the data deletion and the discovery that someone wanted to recover the data.

    SD cards differ from hard drives, so this is a bit tangential to the current topic, but SD card data recovery can be complicated by many of the same formatting and deletion issues found in hard drive data recovery.

    I look forward to any results, tips and tricks or good, well-documented information as to how data recovery fails, and what might be done (or avoided) to make the job more likely to succeed.

    And of course, to know once and for all, which programs are the best at actually recovering data in specific situations on specific media types.

    I dual-boot Windows and Linux, so that scenario is also of interest to me, from the data recovery point of view.
    -- Bob Primak --

  15. #12
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Austin metro area TX USA
    Posts
    1,731
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 128 Times in 125 Posts
    Thanks guys for your wonderfully detailed responses to this thread! Since I do not use the Cloud, awhile back, I added Resplendence's Undelux -- which is quite good at tracking deleted files; it creates a tiny text file for each deleted file, regardless of extension, pointing to the file's location, folder by folder, partition by partition. In my early bird tests, the Undelux had more "green lights" within a couple of my test Data Recovery programs; later, I shall post more of this.
    Last edited by RolandJS; 2015-12-08 at 05:21.
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  16. #13
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    12
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Most, if not all, file recovery programs work well, that includes on SD cards, in my many years of experience, and a dozen or more recovery programs used.
    Failure to recover a file is usually not the fault of the recovery program. It's because the file has been written over it or over parts of it after it had been deleted, but the file name has not disappeared from the system.

    Best chances for recovery is to be done before any changes are made to the affected disk (such as creating or editing files, or downloading files to it, or even booting the system, etc.), and for the drive to be removed (if possible), and connected externally to a USB port.
    No program can recover data that doesn't exist, regardless of its cost. For example, if a deleted file has been written over in part or in total, and just booting from that disk will certainly write over some of these deleted files. The system doesn't know you plan on doing a file recovery

    It's extremely important, for novices at least, to recover deleted files to a different disk to avoid the chance of writing over the data you are trying to recover.

    Using imaging programs, such as Acronis, Reflect, etc., to make a full image of the OS drive, and then weekly incremental backups to that image (Reflect does a great job in this regard), is an excellent method of backing up.
    Using the clouds (OneDrive, DropBox, etc.) is also a great way of instant backup to documents & pictures, etc..

    I have needed to use images that I had created using Reflect this past week on laptops of 2 clients after their system drives crashed due to virus attacks.
    .

  17. #14
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Charleston
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    First time poster. I have a USB external 1.5 TB Seagate drive that has failed. Windows is reporting that the drive must be formatted before use. Seagate file recovery utilities state drive must be initialized before use. One of the links in this thread sent me to OSForensics. Using the free version I am able to select physical drive 1, however it also states drive must be formatted. Commercial file recovery services are quoting anywhere from $550 to $3000 for recovery. Can anyone give me any advice/pointers? Thank you.
    P.S. Ubuntu tells me it cannot mount the drive because it was shut down incorrectly in Windows. Run chkdsk /f. Unable to do so because Windows says to format drive first.
    Last edited by vrisinger; 2015-11-20 at 10:00. Reason: Forgot to add the Linux message

  18. #15
    WS Lounge VIP
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    8,191
    Thanks
    48
    Thanked 985 Times in 915 Posts
    Your drive has probably been corrupted beyond easy recovery - you've tried the obvious things. If your data is that important you may have to pay the money, but there is no guarantee you will recover what you need.

    cheers, Paul

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to Paul T For This Useful Post:

    Fascist Nation (2016-01-20)

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •