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  1. #1
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    W7 Repair Disk CMD PROMPT ?

    When I choose the Cmd Prompt section in my W7 64 Repair Disk I'm presented with [ X:\windows\system32\ ]. The MS KB article shows X:\Sources\.

    I've tried [cd then Press Enter], cd C then Press Enter], [cd C: then Press Enter], [ cd C:\ then Enter ]- and nothing gets me away from this String.

    What character String are you supposed to use with the Cmd Prompt string above to (ie) Boot back into Windows?

    A Saved instruction states type [ cd wind ] in the Cmd Prompt to boot to Windows BUT that fails when coming AFTER the X String above..
    This started when I randomly return to the computer & see a Black Screen with "Reboot & Select Proper Boot Device or Insert Boot Media in Selected Boot Device and Press a Key".
    Turning the computer OFF and waiting 2 min has always eliminated the issue, BUT I'm trying to learn an alternative like the Repair Disk Cmd Prompt approach.
    W7 MS Answers Forum was again no help.
    Any thoughts are appreciated.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Craig,

    The repair disk loads win PE on the X: drive (Ram Drive).

    If you want to get to the C: drive just type C:, the CD command just changes directories in the current drive.

    HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

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  3. #3
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    I THINK I tried C: but forgot to state it. I look forward to testing your Kind Suggestion and will advise.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CraigS26 View Post
    I THINK I tried C: but forgot to state it. I look forward to testing your Kind Suggestion and will advise.
    You were right, [ C: ] produced C:\ ...!

    My presumption is that when the Reboot Error screen appears again I'll enter C: and then at C:\ [ cd wind ] and THAT should get me to Windows.

    Many Thanks for the Reply!

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    To run a chkdsk /f or /r from the Recovery Environment Commad Prompt, first determine where Windows sees the volume with the cmd bcdedit |find "osdevice"

    That is a Pipe symbol before find.

    It may see it in c or d then enter chkdsk x: /f or /r where x is the partition letter, but with just the /f parameter it will display if any KBs are found in bad sectors.

    As you are booted outside of Windows it doesn't have to dismount the volume first with a reboot.

    It's best to just run the /f switch as data can be lost with the /r switch and if it lists any bad sectors, then immediately back up before running the /r switch.

    Enter the cmd exit to close the cmd window then click on Restart to reboot back into Windows.
    Last edited by Sudo15; 2015-11-18 at 10:30.

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    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    A few releases ago, the CD command got changed to allow the optional change of disk letter as well as directory by using the /D parameter.

    Doing CD /? shows (among other examples)
    CD [/D] [drive:][path]

    As far as I can remember, when you've booted from the repair CD, the drive letter of the system image you've restored is actually X:
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

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    Quote Originally Posted by BATcher View Post
    A few releases ago, the CD command got changed to allow the optional change of disk letter as well as directory by using the /D parameter.

    Doing CD /? shows (among other examples)
    CD [/D] [drive:][path]

    As far as I can remember, when you've booted from the repair CD, the drive letter of the system image you've restored is actually X:
    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo15 View Post
    To run a chkdsk /f or /r from the Recovery Environment Commad Prompt, first determine where Windows sees the volume with the cmd bcdedit |find "osdevice"

    That is a Pipe symbol before find.

    It may see it in c or d then enter chkdsk x: /f or /r where x is the partition letter, but with just the /f parameter it will display if any KBs are found in bad sectors.

    As you are booted outside of Windows it doesn't have to dismount the volume first with a reboot.

    It's best to just run the /f switch as data can be lost with the /r switch and if it lists any bad sectors, then immediately back up before running the /r switch.

    Enter the cmd exit to close the cmd window then click on Restart to reboot back into Windows.
    I was so obsessed with the Cmd Prompt String Characters to use I totally missed that Restart should return me to Windows should the Error Screen return.
    Will do that Next Time.

    I presume sudo15's Help suggests that Chkdsk may correct an issue causing the Reboot Error screen and when Macrium Image app failed on an Incremental Image IT TOLD ME to run CHKDSK.

    [It's best to just run the /f switch as data can be lost with the /r switch and if it lists any bad sectors, then immediately back up before running the /r switch.
    BkUp All of C:\ - OR - The Registry?

    BATcher, I've Saved your post, Thanks to all 3 of you!!!!

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    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo15 View Post
    ...It's best to just run the /f switch as data can be lost with the /r switch...
    Please explain exactly how "data can be lost" by using the /r switch rather than the /f switch.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Please explain exactly how "data can be lost" by using the /r switch rather than the /f switch.
    Files may already be damaged if there are bad sectors, but chkdsk /r replaces bad sectors with spares and while it cannot tell whether files are good or not, it only checks if they can be read and will only move readable data.

    As it will only move readable data, data integrity can be lost, so even backing up first, you would only know which files were still good when they came to be used.

    I've tried to quickly find something more authoritative, but this is the best I can find.

    http://www.datarecoveryspecialists.c...-data-recovery

    Running just the /f switch first will show if there any bad sectors and at least will give some warning if it finds bad sectors.

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    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    If you bothered to look at the documentation for chkdsk you would know that chkdsk /r "Locates bad sectors and recovers readable information (implies /F)".
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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    "recovers readable information" is the crux which is what I've said.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo15 View Post
    "recovers readable information" is the crux which is what I've said.
    Clearly you don't understand.

    Chkdsk /f recovers readeable information which is also done by chkdsk /r.

    However chkdsk /r does everything the /f switch commands but also checks freespace on the drive for bad sectors, freespace wrongly marked as allocated, etc.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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    I know that /r implies /f and I think I've already said that only readable info is recovered - I don't know how else to put it other than in my previous post.

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    4 Star Lounger
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    Your request is a bit hard to understand Craig. So I'll try to cover the issues involved.

    1). You booted a Repair disk. Presumably this was... because you wanted to repair something! The Repair disk should present an appropriate command line environment to do that. I'm not clear why you would want to "get away from" that;

    2). When running a Repair disk made by Windows, you are running Windows by definition. The better, more accurate explanation is that you are running a limited version of Windows made for repairing a Windows computer;

    3). If you really want to stop running the Repair Disk environment, just shut the computer off. Or run the following command:

    shutdown /r
    Note that you have to remove the Repair Disk (or USB stick) when you do this or else you'll simply boot back to the Repair Disk all over again!

    4). The command line is famously unhelpful and strict. So all the commands you were trying were either syntactically incorrect, or simply did nothing you wanted;

    5). The old rule was, you can either change drives or change folders, but you cannot do both simultaneously (did not know about cd /D, thanks for that!). Thus correct syntax, old style, for switching to the local hard drive and to the Windows folder is:

    C:
    cd \Windows
    That's 2 commands. New style, you can do it with one command:

    cd /D C:\Windows
    6). Your command use suggests you don't know about absolute versus relative addressing. If you type:

    cd \Windows
    That's an absolute address. As long as there is a Windows folder on the root of the current drive, that command will take you there.

    If you type:

    cd Windows
    That's a relative address (note the lack of a backslash). It asks the command prompt to switch to a folder called Windows, which must appear in the current directory. If there is no such folder at that location, the command doesn't work.

    7). You cannot abbreviate folder names. Ever. Thus,

    cd wind
    Won't ever work except in the unlikely situation you have a folder named "wind" in the current folder. Which wasn't what you were describing.

    Hope that sheds some light!

  17. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo15 View Post
    Running just the /f switch first will show if there any bad sectors and at least will give some warning if it finds bad sectors.
    Then backup the unreadable parts in bad sectors before using /r? Or what?

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