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  1. #1
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    Options For a MoBo with Bent CPU Pins?

    Today I spent about 1-1/2 hours fixing a few bent cpu pins on an LGA 1155 Gigabyte mobo I acquired.
    About 6 needed minor tweaking, and 3 needed "untangling" for lack of a better term.
    One was badly mangled and I just could not get it back to looking right.
    It does not contact the CPU, but I figured lets give the mobo a shot at posting anyway, just for fun.
    Lo and behold, it posted when bench tested, and immediately went into replacing a "corrupt" bios from the main bios.
    After this it loaded Windows 7 from a utility HDD and seems to run just fine. No idea what the one mangled pin is supposed to do, but the cpu seems happy without it.

    This got me thinking, if I had not been able to fix this guy, is there any other option? I am sure this has been asked before, but is there anyone or any place out there that does complete replacement of mangled cpu sockets? Can it even be done, or is it just simply not cost effective?

    Thanks,
    rstew

  2. #2
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    As you suspect, it's not cost effective.

    cheers, Paul

  3. #3
    3 Star Lounger
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    UPDATE:
    Took a look at the LGA1155 pinout designations published by Intel.
    The badly mangled pin I was worried about is AK27; and it turns out to be a ground; one of many many grounds.
    In fact all the pins in the immediate vicinity are also grounds, so it would not have mattered if it was touching one or more of them.
    That explains why the board seems to operate flawlessly when bench tested.
    Guess I dodged a bullet on that one.
    So before you chuck a board that has a bent pin or two, check and see what they do first. You may get lucky!

    rstew

  4. #4
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Yes, you dodged a major bullet there, otherwise your board would/ [EDIT-could] have been scrap.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2015-12-24 at 01:06.
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  5. #5
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    Supposedly you can sometimes manually repair these bent loops. While bending pins (in kinder Intel days) was often successful and as you found out some connections didn't appear to effect the CPU if broken off, bent "pins" on the socket board are seriously problematic. There are some YouTube videos demonstrating how to repair. If it is just one pin fair chance. Unfortunately it usually it is more than one.

    Always contact the MB maker TS. Many will offer a socket board replacement for a surprisingly reasonable fee (they may actually ship a factory refurb) because it is so easy to damage this area irreparably.

    In the OP's case, I'd just enjoy that you dodged a bullet as CLiNT said, and not worry about it.
    Last edited by Fascist Nation; 2015-12-16 at 10:12.

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