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  1. #1
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    Boosting audio volume?

    Can any kind person suggest a method(s) of boosting the audio volume on my desktop computer, running W7 Home Premium with Realtek HD onboard audio? I have tried one method which helped (although I can't remember what it was now, but a setting which did make the sound a bit louder while also making background sounds louder as well - hum etc).

    When listening to debates or lectures, my tired old ears need a bit more volume than I currently get.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    WS Lounge VIP Calimanco's Avatar
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    Get the latest Realtek driver from your PC manufacturers web site. open the Realtek HD Audio Manager in the Control Panel and adjust the settings until you find one that suits your needs.

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    Ian_G (2015-12-12)

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    Thank you for replying Calimanco.

    I installed the latest Realtek HD driver and adjusted all the volumes to maximum. Unfortunately it made no difference to the output volume from what it was originally - it still is not loud enough.

  5. #4
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    Get the latest Realtek driver from Realtek. R2.79 2015/6/25

    http://www.realtek.com/downloads/dow...&GetDown=false

  6. #5
    jwoods
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    You might try running the built-in Windows Troubleshooter...

    Control Panel > Troubleshooter > Hardware and Sound

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    Ian_G (2015-12-14)

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    Thanks FN but that IS the one I installed (and for 64-bit too, which mine is).

  9. #7
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    I have an amplifier between my PC and speakers. Plenty of volume here!
    Something like this will work. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Cambridge-...3D321924283404


    cheers, Paul

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    Ian_G (2015-12-14)

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    There are a lot of really good amplified speakers that will work with PC's. I bought one years ago with two small speakers and a subwoofer. Puts out great music and can go way louder than I would ever want.

    You can also use a range of headphones that will both amplify and reduce ambient sounds.
    Graham Smith
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    "For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.", Arthur C. Clarke (1917 - 2008)

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    Ian_G (2015-12-14)

  13. #9
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    Thank you Paul T and also gsmith. I think you're probably right in that I'm not going to get the volume I'm looking for within the computer and so I will have to look at amplifying the output signal.

    Adding yet another unit/device to my already very cluttered area is not something I particularly wanted to do. I'm 'surrounded' by various units including, I might add, an excellent HiFi amplifier which I do use for broadcasting both computer output and radio/TV/CD/LPs /cassettes etc. I can plug my headphones into that amplifier but the jack socket connection is slightly 'flaky' for some reason and, naturally, if I were to do that it would stop my wife listening to other things through the HiFi speakers.

    I will work it out! But from all your helpful answers, it does appear that I haven't missed any tricks in trying to boost the computer audio volume by somehow tweaking the settings.

    Thanks to all

  14. #10
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    I have my "old" stereo speakers connected to the PC. the TV has the "new" speakers.

    cheers, Paul

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    Fascist Nation (2015-12-16)

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    5 Star Lounger
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    I was going to ask what the impedance of the speakers you were trying to listen to the PC audio was? You might try headphones, buds to see if that is the issue. Or the back or front jack to make sure that is not the issue. Most of the onboard audio doesn't handle impedance well much above 32 Ohms. All PC speakers should be at or under that however.

    For speakers with greater impedance an external amplifier should be employed. Even then, PC audio does not have much in the way of power (Watts) so low impedance but high Watt speakers would require external amplification.

  17. #12
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    I bought a Creative sound card and powered speakers for my desktop, and I now get get 5 watts RMS per channel, which is loud enough to wake the neighbours. It doesn't matter what you have in the way of onboard audio; if the equipment isn't capable of giving enough volume in the first place, settle for less, or buy something decent.

  18. #13
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    When doing a Tune-Up for a customer, I always play a little music, from my Utilities disk, through Windows Media Player, just to make sure that it's working properly.

    I also go into the setups and turn ON the Equalizer. Then I grab the center bar on the equalizer and pull it all the way UP. In almost every case, that will nearly DOUBLE the music coming out of the speakers.* And, it sounds a lot better too!
    * Most of the real Power of music is in the center frequencies.

    You can have the best set of Computer Speakers ever made, and they can only amplify what's coming out of the PC.
    If that sound is not optimized, you'll never really hear GREAT music out of external speakers.

    I find that especially helpful on Laptops, with those funky little speakers.

    I like good music, at a reasonable volume, and some computer speakers can leave a lot to be desired, but with your equalizer set to factory default, you'll never get really great sound.

    Just a thought

    Happy Holidays Everyone

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    Last edited by DrWho; 2015-12-17 at 11:26.
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  19. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian_G View Post
    Can any kind person suggest a method(s) of boosting the audio volume on my desktop computer, running W7 Home Premium with Realtek HD onboard audio? I have tried one method which helped (although I can't remember what it was now, but a setting which did make the sound a bit louder while also making background sounds louder as well - hum etc).

    When listening to debates or lectures, my tired old ears need a bit more volume than I currently get.

    Thank you.
    A simple trick may help. Open your windows Playback Devices window, select the speakers you are using, go to Properties, then Enhancements and check Loudness Equalization. If that doesn't work, buy a cheap amp as suggested... lol.

  20. #15
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    Amplified speakers for your PC (or laptop) are easy to connect and use. Usually, they plug into the same green or light green color jack you're using now on the rear panel of the computer. We have a pair of Creative T40 Mk.2 speakers which have separate bass and treble controls plus a headphone jack right on the front panel of one speaker:

    http://smile.amazon.com/Creative-Gig...ies*=0&ie=UTF8

    A lower priced but still good sounding set (also with a headphone jack) here:

    http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Speak...=logitech+z323

    Or, if you want clear sound that can be picked up and used elsewhere (like out on the deck in the summer) check out the Amazon Basics bluetooth speaker ($40) or, better still, the SHARRK bluetooth speaker ($65). Both of these are single, handy size "bricks" with rechargeable battery built-in. We've had a SHARRK for about a year and it's outstanding for its size with very clear speech and vocals and overall satisfying sound for music listening. It's our patio music system in the summer and our laptop sound system year-round. I even put it on the bathroom counter to play classical music while relaxing in the bath (the laptop stays about 20 or 25 feet away in the bedroom).

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